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eBook In the Long Run: A Father, a Son, and Unintentional Lessons in Happiness epub

by Jim Axelrod

eBook In the Long Run: A Father, a Son, and Unintentional Lessons in Happiness epub
  • ISBN: 0374192111
  • Author: Jim Axelrod
  • Genre: Biographies
  • Subcategory: Arts & Literature
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: Farrar, Straus and Giroux; 1st Edition edition (May 10, 2011)
  • Pages: 304 pages
  • ePUB size: 1859 kb
  • FB2 size 1368 kb
  • Formats azw lit txt rtf


In the Long Run book.

In the Long Run book. Jim Axelrod-once among the most watched correspondents on network news and the first television reporter to broadcast from Saddam International Airport in 2003-is covering the final stages of the race for the Democratic presidential nomination. He’s forty-five years old and thirty pounds overweight. He’s drinking too much, sleeping too little, and scarcely seein It’s 2008.

Jim Axelrod writes with passion and compassion. As the son of a marathoner and father of a young boy myself, In the Long Run had me hooked from the first sentence and kept me thoroughly engaged to the last. A terrific read! -Dean Karnazes, New York Times bestselling author and marathoner. An inspiration to runners and non-runners alike-and a reminder that the love of a family has no finish line. Had he written a book just about his effort to run a marathon, that would have been enough for us. In the Long Run is an uncommonly rich and layered book about the mad pace of modern life and the secret pleasures of the ten-minute mile.

In the Long Run: A Father, a Son, and Unintentional Lessons in Happiness. He's forty-five years old and thirty pounds overweight. He's drinking too much, sleeping too little, and scarcely seeing his family

But first, Jim Axelrod joins us here in Studio 3A. His new book is "In The Long Run: A Father, a Son, and .

But first, Jim Axelrod joins us here in Studio 3A. His new book is "In The Long Run: A Father, a Son, and the Unintentional Lessons in Happiness. Thank you so much for coming in to the studio. JIM AXELROD: Thank you for having me, Andrea. SEABROOK: Jim Axelrod, we are also asking our listeners out there, tell us about a time in your life when you got to a point in your life when you said how did I get here, and then what did you do to pull yourself back. We're going to go first to Loving(ph) in Belleville, Illinois. Hi, you're on TALK OF THE NATION.

In the Long Run. A Father, a Son, and Unintentional Lessons in Happiness

In the Long Run. A Father, a Son, and Unintentional Lessons in Happiness. Farrar, Straus and Giroux. He's drinking too much, sleeping too little, and scarcely seeing his family. He's just figured out that the industry that pulled him up the corporate ladder is imploding as he's reaching for its final rungs.

Jim Axelrod-once among the most watched correspondents on network news .

Jim Axelrod-once among the most watched correspondents on network news and the first television reporter to broadcast from Saddam International Airport in 2003-is covering the final stages of the race for the Democratic presidential nomination.

Jim Axelrod-once among the most watched correspondents on network news and the first television reporter to broadcast from Saddam International Airport. Mass Market Paperback Paperback Hardcover Mass Market Paperback Paperback Hardcover.

Jim Axelrod-once among the most visible correspondents on network news, the first TV reporter to broadcast from Saddam International Airport in 2003, and CBS's chief White House correspondent-is covering Obama's end run on the Democratic nomination. He's forty-five and thirty pounds overweight. He's just figured out that the industry that pulled him up the ladder is imploding as he's reaching for its final rungs

Jewish Book Council, founded in 1944, is the longest-running organization devoted exclusively to the support and celebration of Jewish literature.

Jewish Book Council, founded in 1944, is the longest-running organization devoted exclusively to the support and celebration of Jewish literature. Jim Axelrod - once among the most watched correspondents on networknews - is covering the race for the Democratic presidential nomination. He’s drinkingtoo much, sleeping too little, and scarcely seeing his family. He’s justfigured out that the industry that pulled him up the corporate ladderis imploding as he’s reaching for its final rungs.

It’s 2008. Jim Axelrod—once among the most watched correspondents on network news and the first television reporter to broadcast from Saddam International Airport in 2003—is covering the final stages of the race for the Democratic presidential nomination. He’s forty-five years old and thirty pounds overweight. He’s drinking too much, sleeping too little, and scarcely seeing his family. He’s just figured out that the industry that pulled him up the corporate ladder is imploding as he’s reaching for its final rungs. Then, out of the blue, Jim discovers his late father’s decades-old New York Marathon finish times. At forty-six, Bob Axelrod ran a 3:29:58. With everything else going on in his life, Jim sets himself a defining challenge: “Can I beat him?” So begins a deeply felt, often hilarious, quixotic effort to run the 2009 New York Marathon. Along the way, Jim confronts his listing marriage, a career upset by the seismic changes going on throughout the television news industry, excruciatingly painful shin splints, and the worst-timed kidney stone possible. Looming over it all is the shadow of a loving father, who repeatedly lost his way in life but still has a lesson to impart. This is a book about a dead father’s challenge to a son at a crossroads, but, more than that, it is about the personal costs paid when ambition and talent are not enough to ensure success. Most fundamentally, though, it is a book about learning what it takes to be happy in your own skin.
Comments: (7)
Usaxma
Just finished this well-written book. I am not a runner, not Jewish, not impressed by celebrity and as a medical professional I feel I get enough 'real life', so I usually read Fiction, and lots of it, for relaxation. Only picked this up because he's coming nearby to talk about his book, at my kid's school, so I thought I'd give it a read to see if I'd bother to go...And I'm so glad that I did! Very honest, (sometimes almost excruciating in it's honesty), refreshing, hopeful...it was just what I needed as the colder weather brought a slower pace and the usual slightly gloomy pre-holiday feeling around. Not an earth-shattering tale by any means, but a deep, quiet reflection on getting back to the basics of health, family and happiness and appreciating the small things - the things that matter.
Shazel
I picked up this book because it resonated with me on many levels: I am training for my first marathon. My father died relatively young. I had a career change that rocked my professional life as well. I am also a father raising a family and care about their future happiness and well being. But, I enjoyed this book for not only the things the author and I had in common but for HOW it was written. Funny, self-deprecating, honest and without ego - this must have been a tough one to put out there for the general public (and his colleagues) to read. I'm reminded of the scene in Cameron Crowe's Jerry Maguire when Jerry realizes his Mission Statement had already been delivered - should I have really done that? But all great art is ultimately honest and journalists are notorious for keeping an impeccable image - mostly so THEY don't become the news e.g Dan Rather. So kudos to a professional that bared his heart and exposed his weaknesses - we all have them, we are not all willing to share and help others learn to overcome and/or live with them. Makes me want to watch for Jim Axelrod stories on the news now.
Jube
Great book written by an old high school friend.
Kagrel
i've always been a Jim Axelrod fan and this sealed the deal. he writes as though he's sitting in my living room and telling me the story. and the read came just in time - as he was dealing with his father's death, so was i. it's an inspirational story.
Akir
Jim's story is an insightful perspective on how important family and friends are, how the demands of a successful professional career can distract one from the more important goal and how running can help one understand the difference between personal fulfillment and professional success. One does not have to be a runner to relate to Jim's experience or to enjoy the read.
Hulore
Arrived in timely manner; excellent book. Thanks!
fabscf
Fantastic story! Loved it.
In the Long Run is one of those rare memoirs that offers the reader the satisfaction of traveling along with a very engaging writer as he takes stock of his life, and finds the answers to the questions that many of us have. Who am I, and how the heck did I manage to get as bungled up as I find myself to be in the middle of my life?

Jim Axelrod's story skillfully weaves together the threads of his life as a father and husband, son of a charismatic but enigmatic man, television reporter, and aspiring athlete. At times unflinchingly revealing, entertaining, nostalgic, and frequently inspiring, I found this book to be a great read, and didn't want it to end. Also, all the parts about going from being somewhat (ahem) out of shape to running a marathon were great. It would make a fantastic Father's Day gift from either generation to the other. A journey through some of life's deeper, darker questions and the answers which led to a place of quiet contentment and happiness.
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