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eBook The Fasting Girl: A True Victorian Medical Mystery epub

by Michelle Stacey

eBook The Fasting Girl: A True Victorian Medical Mystery epub
  • ISBN: 1585421359
  • Author: Michelle Stacey
  • Genre: Biographies
  • Subcategory: Arts & Literature
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: Tarcher; First Edition edition (April 1, 2002)
  • Pages: 256 pages
  • ePUB size: 1745 kb
  • FB2 size 1808 kb
  • Formats mbr mobi lit txt


The Fasting Girl: A True. has been added to your Cart. In the late 1800's, a girl named Mollie Fancher became a strange sort of celebrity when she purportedly went over 12 years on nothing more than a few sips of milk and a small banana following a bizarre horsecar accident.

The Fasting Girl: A True. She never again left her bed, and in doing so became known as the "Brooklyn Enigma.

The Fasting Girl book. Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read. Start by marking The Fasting Girl: A True Victorian Medical Mystery as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read. A modern investigation of the case of a young Victorian woman who.

In The Fasting Girl, acclaimed journalist Michelle Stacey tells the story of. .Lauded by Entertainment Weekly as one of the top ten books of 2002 an.

In The Fasting Girl, acclaimed journalist Michelle Stacey tells the story of Mollie Fancher, a young Brooklyn woman who became "the most famous sick person in the world" because of her claim to have lived for more than a decade without food. During the Victorian age-a time when even respectable newspapers had a tabloid edge-some of the world's most renowned and controversial celebrities were women who could allegedly abstain from eating for months or even years at a time

Michelle Stacey's book, THE FASTING GIRL, is a lucid and compelling examination of the life of Mollie Fancher, a young Victorian woman who, after a streetcar accident in 1865, manifested bizarre physical symptoms including weakness, various paralyses, and apparent blindness an.

Michelle Stacey's book, THE FASTING GIRL, is a lucid and compelling examination of the life of Mollie Fancher, a young Victorian woman who, after a streetcar accident in 1865, manifested bizarre physical symptoms including weakness, various paralyses, and apparent blindness and claimed to live twelve years without food.

Leguin, Ursula K. Tehanu: The Last Book Of Earthsea. Spider In The Sink: A Kate Mulcay Mystery. Devine, Thomas E. Eyewitness: The Amelia Earhart Incident. Taylor, Frank J. From Land And Sea: The Story of Castle and Cooke of Hawaii. A Music Behind The Wall. Selected Stories: Volume One. hartmannbooks.

The Fasting Girl: A True Victorian Medical Mystery. New York: Putnam, 2002. Michelle Stacey explores this fascinating story as a journalist with a special interest in American attitudes toward food. Both books return us to the concept of women's sphere, yet both of these multidimensional studies come to that concept with a much greater understanding of the complexities of that sphere than the earliest work on women.

Its vibrancy is all the more impressive considering the tale revolves around a woman who didn’t leave her bed for 60 years. A. The Fasting Girl: A True Victorian Medical Mystery.

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The Victorian Fasting Girls, young girls who supposedly stopped eating .

The Victorian Fasting Girls, young girls who supposedly stopped eating for months and even years at a time, were somewhat of a phenomenon from the mid-1800s to the early 1900s. Here are a few of their stories. By the end of two weeks, the medical team concluded that their patient never took or even attempted to take food. Also known as the Tingwick Girl, Josephine Marie Bedard is a prime example of how fascinated the public was with these girls who seemingly did not need to ingest anything even remotely resembling nutrition to survive.

Stacey M. Wenger S. Jensen, J. The book lover’s cookbook: recipes inspired by celebrated works of literature and the passages that feature them. Steele V. Encyclopedia of clothing and fashion. Detroit: Charles Scribner’s Sons, 2005. The corset: a cultural history. New Haven: Yale University Press, 2001. Teachman D. Understanding Jane Eyre: a student casebook to issues, sources, and historical documents. New York: Ballantine Books, 2003. Woolf V. Women and writing. New York: Harcourt Brace Jovanovich, 1980.

The riveting true account of Mollie Fancher, who, in 1865, was plagued with a vast array of ailments including paralysis and trances, all of which caused her to "live on air" for the rest of her life, examines such intriguing phemonena as fasting saints and the dawn of the Age of Neurosis, detailing the social and technoligical turmoil of the time. 20,000 first printing.
Comments: (7)
Adaly
There's no actual mystery here, the author reveals around page 70 or so that the subject of the narrative suffered from what we now know to be schizophrenia or multiple personality disorder. Given the poor girl's disastrous childhood, it's no wonder. The writing style is compelling, full of interesting Victorian details and observations but my interest waned after the 'mystery' was solved less than 100 pages in.

Kind of ironic that some reviewers here say the actual truth of this 'medical marvel' will never be known - they're just as gullible today as the Victorians were back then.
Mightsinger
This was a very different book...with different meaning in a good way. Stacey did a tremendous amount of research into both the family of Mollie Fancher, and the times in which she lived. Just as in a hundred years when people read about the predominance of anorexia nervosa, they will not totally understand the mechanisms and stressors behind girls of our time literally starving themselves to death...we cannot possibly understand the workings of Mollie Fancher's decisions to alter the controls of her own life without understanding the immense pressures she was under. There is this prevailing concept now that things were 'easier in the good old days' because our own world is so complex and often so violent. Yet, we too quickly forget that the 'old days' including frequent deaths by bear children, terrible diseases that took the lives of children who lived past the first year and adults, crowded and polluted conditions in cities, and total lack of respect for women as shown in how little say they had in their own lives.
Mollie had experienced almost all of these things by the time she reached sixteen. From a middle class family, she lost her mother early to childbirth, she had lost brothers/sisters to disease, her father remarried and abandoned the original family (which seemed to happen a lot according to my eugenics research), Mollie was fast approaching the age where she would be required to leave school, and marry and have children. The final straw was getting her long skirts entangled in a street car upon leaving it, and getting dragged for a long period of time.
Stacey makes it clear that the decisions Mollie made to remain bedridden were probably not consciously overt decisions. Mollie must have retained a phobia concerning childbirth after seeing what it did to her beloved mother, and she was given a pretty good education only to be expected to submerge that education and her independence upon marriage. By choosing to invalid herself, she managed to retain some control over her own life...but at costs not only to others like her family who had to take care of her, but also to herself. Mollie was not a traditional anorexic as we are familiar with all too well these days. She may have gone through an early stage of fasting and food avoidance, but her invalidism did not have a significant effect on her length of life. Her photos look like she was fairly well-fed and at middle life, was heavy as so many of us women get. The mystery in this book is not concerned as much with the claim by others mainly that she lived on relatively little food. She may have not eaten a lot, but being bed-ridden with no exercise would certainly not have demanded that she eat a lot to retain a decent figure of health. The real mystery has to do with the reaction of society towards Mollie, the scientists who fought to prove she was a 'fake' though she was relatively uninterested in celebrity, and the absolute fascination that the press and society with Mollie's abilities and her problems.
That Mollie was fooling herself is discernible in Stacey's fine writing. That others allowed Mollie's sure belief in herself to close their own eyes to reality is also obvious. As usual, scientists (usually minor ones too) were quick to jump on any available media soapbox to promote their own 'scientific' ideas against any possible spiritual reason for Mollie's continued existence. Not much has changed in 140 years. Scientists are still jumping on any available media soapbox to promote their ideas...and the quacks with their speculations, unproven theories, risky practices, and self-conceit are all around us again (including some Nobel prize winners who make ridiculous statements to the press!).
I found the history of all this incredibly fascinating. Stacey wandered a bit from Mollie's story, yet the wanderings were interesting and added to the general understanding of Mollie's frame of mind, as well as that of the scientists and her own rabid supporters. One thing this book does it make you look at your own beliefs and prejudices to see if they hold up under inspection.
I remember 'hearing' that anorexics were using food as both an attention-getter and as a power struggle within the family and society. To an extent, I think the power theory has validation, but I no longer believe that these girls (and occasionally men) do this as an attention getter. They are actually the opposite...sneaky, trying to avoid eating at all costs, using any means to void the body of nutritional benefit. These people truly do not understand after a certain point their own self-destructive behavior. Though Mollie may not have been a traditional anorexic, she also did not totally understand her own unconscious decisions...because in letters and statements she had made to others it is clear she 'missed' being able to do certain things. Karen Sadler,
Science Education,
University of Pittsburgh
Frostdefender
In the late 1800's, a girl named Mollie Fancher became a strange sort of celebrity when she purportedly went over 12 years on nothing more than a few sips of milk and a small banana following a bizarre horsecar accident. She never again left her bed, and in doing so became known as the "Brooklyn Enigma."

Although this book is a nonfiction account of Miss Fancher's life and celebrity, Michelle Stacey writes it as if it was a mystery novel. She gives just enough information to entice the reader to the next chapter, interspersing the details of Mollie's life with background information on the Victorian era, early Brooklyn, and the history of neurosis.

Despite the enthralling nature of the subject, Stacey's writing sometimes drags. The reader finds herself wondering why we need to know this particular piece of information and whether we'll be getting back to the point anytime soon.

In light of this, however, I would still recommend this book to anyone who enjoys a good medical mystery. Unfortunately, Mollie died before revealing the secret behind her 14 year fast, so this mystery must remain one for the ages.
Gavikelv
"One can't believe impossible things."
"I daresay you haven't had much practice," said the Queen. "When I was your age, I always did it for half-an-hour a day. Why, sometimes I've believed as many as six impossible things before breakfast."
That a goodly number of people in the United States would believe a young woman could survive for twelve years without eating anything more substantial than a cracker or a sip or two of milk punch now and then, is probably not to be wondered at too much. They in fact took to this belief with a fervor usually reserved for predictions about the end of the world--- give away all of your property and come sit in this cave to wait for it to happen.
And the author has done a lot of research into the state of the nerves of America in the last half of the 19th century-- bad, very bad. But it's the application of the research to the case of Mollie Francher that hits a bump in the road.
Did she have multiple personalities? Was she a hysteric? Did she suffer from chlorosis? Neuresthenia? Anorexia Nervosa? Take your pick. There is support for all of these. She could twist herself into shapes that would have astonished the exocist, lay for weeks and months in a trance, claimed to be completely blind while turning out fancy work-- sold in a shop on the ground floor of her home, and displayed what appeared to be psychic abilities.
It was very interesting to read about the birth pangs of psychiatry and the personalities who midwived it. Chlorosis (green sickness) and neuresthenia seemed similar in description to modern chronic fatigue syndrome. I took a liking to railway spine (caused by traveling at such a high rate of speed)and in light of some of the information provided, the case of Mrs. Palsgraf and the Long Island Railroad Company, that has bedeviled many a first year Torts student makes more sense.
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