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eBook Here Comes Everybody epub

by James Fearnley

eBook Here Comes Everybody epub
  • ISBN: 0571253970
  • Author: James Fearnley
  • Genre: Biographies
  • Subcategory: Arts & Literature
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: Faber & Faber Social; Main edition (April 4, 2013)
  • Pages: 416 pages
  • ePUB size: 1280 kb
  • FB2 size 1852 kb
  • Formats lit lrf doc mobi


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Here Comes Everybody: Th. Fearnley’s book fits perfectly with the Pogues: for all their earthiness, they were a band concerned with myths, from the Irish legends MacGowan’s lyrics relocated to the back streets and pubs of north London to the persistent rock’n’roll fable of the damned, beautiful loser. In the process, MacGowan became a mythic figure himself: a myth, despite the unsparing detail that Fearnley ends up burnishing.

But as accordionist James Fearnley's memoir makes clear, there was a time when the notion of the Pogues becoming a.Still, there are other reasons to enjoy Here Comes Everybody.

But as accordionist James Fearnley's memoir makes clear, there was a time when the notion of the Pogues becoming a beloved Christmas institution would have seemed bizarre, even slightly terrifying. Fearnley is brilliant at conjuring the milieu from which the Pogues sprang, a lost, down-at-heel demimonde of King's Cross squats and housing association flats. If he can't or won't tell you why MacGowan's decline occurred, he describes it in harrowing detail: the screaming fits, the vomiting, his skin "the colour of grout". Fearnley was a frustrated novelist when the Pogues formed, which rather shows.

Here Comes Everybody: The Power of Organizing Without Organizations is a book by Clay Shirky published by Penguin Press in 2008 on the effect of the Internet on modern group dynamics and organization. According to Shirky, the book is about "what happens when people are given the tools to do things together, without needing traditional organizational structures"

Here Comes Everybody book.

Here Comes Everybody book. One of the best books I've read so far this year.

Here Comes Everybody is a memoir written by founding member and accordion player James Fearnley, drawn from his personal experiences and the series of journals and correspondence he kept throughout the band’s career. Fearnley describes the coalescence of a disparate collection of vagabonds living in the squats of London’s Kings Cross, with, at its center, the charismatic MacGowan and his idea of turning Irish traditional music on its head.

Here Comes Everybody is a great tale, but be warned: Fearnley's thesaurus must have caught fire as he gathered his memories.

Download the new Indpendent Premium app. Sharing the full story, not just the headlines. Here Comes Everybody is a great tale, but be warned: Fearnley's thesaurus must have caught fire as he gathered his memories. You'll find no bald drunks here: such types are inactive of follicle, pellucidly inebriate. This can prove wearing, but one must surely forgive a man – to paraphrase Dorothy Parker – who once played the accordion and now does not. More about.

бесплатно, без регистрации и без смс. October 1982: ABC, Culture Club, Shalamar and Survivor dominate the top twenty when the Pogues barrel out from the backstreets of King's Cross, a furious, pioneering mix of punk energy, traditional melodies. October 1982: ABC, Culture Club, Shalamar and Survivor dominate the top twenty when the Pogues barrel out from the backstreets of King's Cross, a furious, pioneering mix of punk energy, traditional melodies and the powerfully poetic songwriting of Shane MacGowan.

4. The Pogues Photo: Frederic REGLAIN /GAMMA. In 1980, when the young Mancunian guitarist James Fearnley auditioned to be in a band with a notorious London Irish punk called Shane O’Hooligan, he describes the chain-smoking frontman with the watery blue eyes looking as though he had come off worst in a fight or two. I could see where the cartilage twisted under the skin of his nose and where a kink of scar traipsed from an upturned lip into a nostril.

James Fearnley Here Comes Everybody. The Story of The Pogues. Price for Eshop: 358 Kč (€ 1. ). This book tells their story. Availability: Expected delivery time 14-30 days. Publisher: Faber & Faber. You can ask us about this book and we'll send an answer to your e-mail.

October 1982: ABC, Culture Club, Shalamar and Survivor dominate the top twenty when the Pogues barrel out from the backstreets of King's Cross, a furious, pioneering mix of punk energy, traditional melodies and the powerfully poetic songwriting of Shane MacGowan. Reviled by traditionalists for their frequently fast, often riotous interpretations of Irish folk songs, the Pogues rose from the sweaty chaos of backroom gigs in Camden pubs to world tours with the likes of Elvis Costello, U2 and Bob Dylan, and had huge commercial success with everyone's favourite Christmas song, 'Fairytale of New York'. Yet, the exuberance of their live performances coupled with relentless touring spiralled into years of hard drinking and excess which eventually took their toll - most famously on Shane, but also on the rest of the band - causing them to part ways seven years later. Here, their story is told with beauty, lyricism and great candour by James Fearnley, founding member and accordion player. He brings to life the youthful friendships, the bust-ups, the amazing gigs, the terrible gigs, the fantastic highs and the dramatic lows in a hugely compelling, humorous, moving and honest account of life in one of our most treasured and original bands.
Comments: (7)
Ueledavi
Very in-depth look at one of the more intriguing groups of the genre. A lot of particular focus on Shane MacGowan and his personal demons, but I suppose, he is kind of the star of the group, so casual Pogues fans would enjoy that part of it. Hardcore fans will enjoy the sidebars about the other people in the group simply writing songs or arranging instrumentals with a singular goal in mind, while the leader was off trouncing around somewhere.
Kanal
This book surprised me. Not because I liked it; I knew I would. Having read Fearnley's Pogues reunion tour diaries I knew he could write, and his frank retelling of the Pogues' private moments captivates. What surprised me was Fearnley's use of, as he puts it, "the tools and sensibilities of a fiction writer." Fearnley was an aspiring writer before he joined the Pogues, telling founders MacGowan and Finer he would only join the band if it didn't interfere with the novel he was writing.
Another surprise is that Fearnley chose not to deal with the reunited 21st Century Pogues. The book opens with the August 1991 band meeting in Japan when MacGowan's mates decided to fire him from the band he started. Then the history of the Pogues' first incarnation is told in a kind of flashback before ending in 1991 onstage during MacGowan's last performance with the band (pre-reunion, that is). The approach works nicely.
What I like best about HERE COMES EVERYBODY is Fearnley's candor, from the cover photo to the final sentence, in placing Shane MacGowan at the story's center. As a MacGowan fanatic I've often felt his band mates exhibited ingratitude towards him. While Fearnley makes it clear that MacGowan was responsible for the band's demise, he seems to recognize that their careers were built on Shane's genius. Overall, this book should delight Pogues fans.Rake at the Gates of Hell: Shane MacGowan in Context
Wetiwavas
I came to the Pogues kind of late, but with a pedigree. It was Joe Strummer who recommended them to me, if you can believe it. What a nice man, and as Mr. Fearnley states in his acknowledgements, I wish he was still around to thank. That said, I haven't read a music memoir since "No One Here Gets Out Alive" quite some years ago, but I would definitely recommend this book as a good read. I enjoyed it very much. It must be very unique to find a musician who is also a capable writer. Who better to tell the story of the band than someone who actually lived it? To me, it's the personal insight that really sets this book apart from just a basic compilation of facts. Hope you read it and enjoy it, too.
Thabel
Beautifully and poetically rendered, this book makes vivid the wondrous yet tragic story, in rich yet honest human terms, of the fascinating and brilliant world of what The Pogues were, and perhaps more poignantly, what they could've been, if not for the demons too often haunting creative genius.
It makes me more appreciative of what they've already given, while also making me yearn for more. Just as I wish as a complete unit with Shane that they could create more music (though sadly this seems not to be in the cards), this book of James' makes me wish to know the rest of the story to the present.
But, if nothing else, I surely hope Mr. Fearnley chooses to keep writing.
Micelhorav
Any first-hand account of this exceptional band is bound to be fascinating, but Fearnly brings a vibrant feel to his depiction of his iconic band.
MrDog
This wasn't a bad book but it was pompous in some distinct ways, and read at times like the author had a thesaurus propped up beside him.
Thetahuginn
I'll start by saying this: I've read a lot of music books and memoirs. A LOT. And not just famous ones, weird crap like the autobiography by some random horn player from Three Dog Night, and that canonical 300 page book on "Louie Louie", so if I have some kind of authority on something in this world, I tend to think this is probably it. With that said, I believe this is one of the top 3 music books I've ever read (Nick Kent's "The Dark Stuff" is definitely one of the other two, and Michael Azerrad's "Our Band Could Be Your Life" may be the other). James Fearnley describes early on in the book his dream to be a writer rather than a musician, and I can see why. He has a rare and remarkable skill in telling a story, peppering the narrative with subtle detail, beautiful imagery, and a keen sense of observation. He shares his memories-- which come semi-fictionalized, but based on his memory and diaries-- with alacrity, melancholy, wistfulness, and self-deprecation. They are engaging and human, and there's rarely a page that doesn't suffuse the reader with the drunken mixture of boundless promise and impending collapse that being a part of the Pogues must have been filled with. Some may find Fearnley's use of arcane vocabulary pretentious or unnecessary, but I personally found the story augmented by his deliberate and exacting word choices. A brilliant book, and one that I find myself returning to often.
In the book James Fearnley alludes to the time when he was primarily a writer, and I think he has exercised his considerable skill in talking about his time with the Pogues. I wasn't expecting a great description of the Scandinavian countryside. An excellent account of everything that went on inside his band--I knew Elvis Costello produced "Rum, Sodomy and the Lash" but had no idea how involved he was. I always hear people talking and writing about how they were surprised that Shane MacGowan is still alive, now I'm surprised anyone is still alive. I recommend this book for anyone interested in the Pogues, or the 80's music scene in Europe. This book fills the bill on both accounts!
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