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eBook My Incredibly Wonderful, Miserable Life: An Anti-Memoir epub

by Adam Nimoy

eBook My Incredibly Wonderful, Miserable Life: An Anti-Memoir epub
  • ISBN: 1439125465
  • Author: Adam Nimoy
  • Genre: Biographies
  • Subcategory: Arts & Literature
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: Gallery Books; Reprint edition (June 9, 2009)
  • Pages: 304 pages
  • ePUB size: 1809 kb
  • FB2 size 1454 kb
  • Formats doc rtf txt mobi


The funny, sad, and heartwarming memoir by Leonard Nimoy's son Adam Nimoy-who bounces back after suffering through severe drug addiction. Adam Nimoy is a director, writer, and lecturer. He lives in California. Follow him on Twitter: Nimoy.

The funny, sad, and heartwarming memoir by Leonard Nimoy's son Adam Nimoy-who bounces back after suffering through severe drug addiction. Paperback: 304 pages.

Download it once and read it on your Kindle device, PC, phones or tablets. I would state, first all, that his life has been neither incredibly wonderful nor miserable. For the son of a Hollywood star, his life has been about average, with the usual addiction problems that seems to dog nearly every such individual. I will say that I have always enjoyed Leonard Nimoy's work, particularly the van Gogh one-man show in the 1980s, and of course all the Star Trek stuff has been fun.

A thirty-year battle with drug addiction, three career changes, one divorce, a major mid-life crisis, and countless AA meetings later, Leonard Nimoy's son, Adam, tells his cautionary - and very funny - tale. I ask only once a year: please help the Internet Archive today.

Start by marking My Incredibly Wonderful, Miserable Life: An Anti-Memoir as Want to Read .

Start by marking My Incredibly Wonderful, Miserable Life: An Anti-Memoir as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read. And, oh yeah, the wonderful, miserable truth about growing up the son of a pop culture icon. In a city where appearing perfect is a way of life, Adam Nimoy doesn't mince words.

My Incredibly Wonderful, Miserable Life: An Anti-Memoir. The funny, sad, and heartwarming memoir by Leonard Nimoy's son Adam Nimoy-who bounces back after suffering through severe drug addiction, multiple career changes, and a devastating divorce. Augusten Burroughs meets Don Rickles meets Larry David in this riveting chronicle by the son of Spock that includes a thirty-year battle with drug addiction, three career changes, one divorce, a major mid-life crisis, and countless AA meetings.

The funny, sad, and heartwarming memoir by Leonard Nimoy's son Adam Nimoy-who bounces .

The funny, sad, and heartwarming memoir by Leonard Nimoy's son Adam Nimoy-who bounces back after suffering through severe drug addiction, multiple career .

Wonderful, Miserable Life by Adam Nimoy. Sneak Peek Read the first two chapters from the book in PDF format.

My Incredibly Wonderful, Miserable Life by Adam Nimoy. Pocket Books (July 22, 2008) ISBN-13: 9781416572572 Hardcover 304 pages. Pocket Books (June 2009) ISBN-13: 9781439125465 Softcover 304 pages. Description Live long and prosper? Ha. Last week, Adam Nimoy woke up in his beautiful house with his wife and kids in West Los Angeles -more.

Adam Nimoy delivers the story of his incredibly wonderful miserable life . A life redeemed, and good for him! Published by Thriftbooks

Adam Nimoy delivers the story of his incredibly wonderful miserable life as an assortment of life lessons, anecdotes, and rants as provocative as they ar. .The funny, sad, and heartwarming memoir by Leonard Nimoy's son Adam Nimoy who bounces back after suffering through severe drug addiction, multiple career changes, and a devastating divorce. A life redeemed, and good for him! Published by Thriftbooks. com User, 10 years ago. This is a book I was interested in reading for several reasons.

The funny, sad, and heartwarming memoir by Leonard Nimoy's son Adam Nimoy—who bounces back after suffering through severe drug addiction, multiple career changes, and a devastating divorce. Augusten Burroughs meets Don Rickles meets Larry David in this riveting chronicle by the son of Spock that includes a thirty-year battle with drug addiction, three career changes, one divorce, a major mid-life crisis, and countless AA meetings. In this frankly humble and hilarious anti-memoir, Adam Nimoy shares the incredibly wonderful, miserable truth about life as a newly divorced father, a forty-something on the L.A. dating scene, a recovering user, and a former lawyer turned director turned substitute teacher...in search of his true self. And, most importantly, he shares the wonderful, miserable truth about growing up the son of a pop culture icon. He’s been rushed by crazed Star Trek fans at a carnival, propositioned by his father’s leading ladies, promised by his own teenage daughter that she never wants to see him again, and fired by famous television producers for his temper. In a city and amidst an industry where appearing perfect is a way of life, Adam Nimoy doesn’t mince words, and My Incredibly Wonderful, Miserable Life is his cautionary, startlingly honest, and very funny tale.
Comments: (7)
Ger
Adam's humility and life trial remorse, made him seem real and likable except for his gratuitous references regarding his need to get laid ASAP. (Yea, gotta crowbar sex into everything these days or it won't sell). I was born the same year as the author, so I wanted to identify with the material. The accounts of his own indifferent childhood worked for me, but the author's endless guilt trips and catering to his peevish children bored me. AN eventually tries to connect with his own father by apologizing for everything, with undetermined success due to lack of response. The generally mundane content, writing style and its lack of organization helped me drift off to sleep at night. Bottom line: Demon purgers, parents oozing pride sap and those with insufficient sex lives should not write books about it. Most people avoid listening to such accounts in real life and are less inclined to fork over hard earned cash to endure it. For paying audiences, the idea is to make an interesting, entertaining, and compelling read.
Coiron
Mr Nimoy's book is quite uneven, so it is hard to review, but I will try. I would state, first all, that his life has been neither incredibly wonderful nor miserable. For the son of a Hollywood star, his life has been about average, with the usual addiction problems that seems to dog nearly every such individual. I will say the "recovery" portion of this book is among it's weakest parts, with his attendance at 12 step meetings depicted as mostly as an attempt to pick up chicks and get laid. I didn't find this funny, more pathetic. Enough about that.
Mr Nimoy's memories of his parents are sprinkled throughout and there are some interesting things here. From a viewpoint of 40 and 50 years later, he recalls his father as largely busy working, or doing home improvement type projects. For context, I am a bit younger than Mr Nimoy, and I don't recall my father trying to be our "friend". Back in the 60's and the 70's, Daddy was there to earn the living. He was the ultimate disciplinarian, not entertainment for the kids. When he wasn't at work, he was tired, and he was to be left alone.
Then, as now, earning an adequate living often required overtime or a second job.The underlying harshness of daily life is the reason why television programs like Star Trek depicting a Utopian high tech society are so popular. They are a welcome escape from reality. However, each hour long program we saw as a finished product, filled with apparent futuristic "magic" actually required a week of long days to film. There had to have been a lot of repetitive and monotonous work involved, a great deal of practicing and repeating scenes until they were good enough. Nothing glamorous.

Apparently Adam Nimoy worked as a lawyer for several years and soon discovered there was a great deal of monotonous paper work involved. So that wasn't for him. The author comes across as spoiled and immature, an unfortunate product of privilege. He comments that his father's character was forged when he was a poor child, selling newspapers on Boston Commons to help the family make ends meet. Leonard Nimoy went on to Hollywood as a young man where he appeared in bit parts for many years, often working various other part time and odd jobs to support his family. He cleaned office fish tanks. There is no doubt that if he had not been in Star Trek, he would have continued in that fashion for many more years.So there was an element of the love of acting for itself, as well as old fashioned persistence.

A book that die hard Star Trek fans might enjoy, skimming through some parts. In truth, if Adam Nimoy were not Leonard's son, this story would be of no interest.There are no great revelations here about dealing with divorce or substance abuse. Mostly it is about Adam Nimoy's faliure to take adequate advantage of the connections he would have had through his father, choosing to smoke pot instead. Boring.
FailCrew
I found this book searching for information on how people who have gone through addiction treatment stay sober and get their lives back in order.

Personally, I enjoyed the book. Most of what's out there is the "how I ended up passed out on the floor of a public restroom before getting help" (to paraphrase what Mr. Nimoy jokingly told his shocked mother he was writing about). This, instead, is about addiction, a sad and rather neglectful childhood, recovery, surviving divorce, changing careers, forgiving, and parenting. It's written with a strong sense of humor and irony, as well as a good deal of sadness over missing the father-son relationship.

No wonder the author calls it an anti-memoir.

A lot of reviewers seemed to expect this book would be Life With Leonard. Nimoy discusses why he rejected this in the opening chapter's conversation with a would-be agent. But anyone who looks at the cover photo of a guy passed out on a Hollywood star of fame should know better. The back cover features the grimmest family portrait I have ever seen---4 people in their groovy 1960s clothes and hair, and looking utterly miserable. In the book, Adam says it's his favorite family photo because it accurately depicts how fragmented they were.

I will say that I have always enjoyed Leonard Nimoy's work, particularly the van Gogh one-man show in the 1980s, and of course all the Star Trek stuff has been fun. I must say that after reading this book, I am more grateful than ever for the much more attentive parenting I received growing up. I was also struck by the similarities between my father's and Leonard Nimoy's childhoods.

What I took from this book is the importance of maintaining your sense of humor and self-worth when you are struggling. It really doesn't matter what you are struggling with. This isn't a book for fanboys and fangirls. It could have been written by anyone; it's just the fact that a famous name gives it more variety in the stories it recounts. (I laughed when Adam writes that William Shatner never recognizes him, and reminiscing about visiting the Star Trek set to gaze at Shatner's hairpiece. I also liked when he and his sister talk about eBaying backyard rocks their father used to paint antiwar slogans.) This is essentially about how one person survived the perils of 20th and 21st century life. Even people from affluent families struggle with the same stuff as the less well-off. The difference is whether and how we overcome our struggles.
Burisi
I read this book while my own father was in the hospital. I had heard of Adam through his girlfriend Beatrice at UC Berkeley. She got me running my freshman year. My brothers and father were total Spock fans. I admired Leonard's creative output through the decades. The minute I heard Adam had written a book I ordered it immediately. I was not disappointed. What an incredible testimony of healing the difficult emotions and making room for more health and happiness in life. Adam is an authentic man, father and writer. Any man (or woman) wanting to learn how to navigate life when the road is extra slippery will find this book of great inspiration and comfort.
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