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eBook John James Audubon: The Making of an American epub

by Richard Rhodes

eBook John James Audubon: The Making of an American epub
  • ISBN: 0375414126
  • Author: Richard Rhodes
  • Genre: Biographies
  • Subcategory: Arts & Literature
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: Knopf (October 12, 2004)
  • Pages: 528 pages
  • ePUB size: 1239 kb
  • FB2 size 1402 kb
  • Formats mobi doc mbr lit


Richard Rhodes has given us an indispensable portrait of a true American icon. This book is nothing short of MAGNIFICENT! Rhodes is an elegant writer who knows and loves his subject as well as history and gets it all right

Richard Rhodes has given us an indispensable portrait of a true American icon. This book is nothing short of MAGNIFICENT! Rhodes is an elegant writer who knows and loves his subject as well as history and gets it all right. This is more than the biography of one brilliant man; it is a history of frontier America in its early days and is populated with much more than birds. There are Indians, friends, enemies, 4-legged animals, and yes, loads and loads of American birds. The voyages back and forth from Europe to America are enlightening and amazing to think about.

John James Audubon came to America as a dapper eighteen-year-old eager to make his fortune. They gave America its idea of itself. He had a talent for drawing and an interest in birds, and he would spend the next thirty-five years traveling to the remotest regions of his new country–often alone and on foot–to render his avian subjects on paper. Here Richard Rhodes vividly depicts Audubon’s life and career: his epic wanderings; his quest to portray birds in a lifelike way; his long, anguished separations from his adored wife; his ambivalent witness to the vanishing of the wilderness. John James Audubon: The Making of an American is a magnificent achievement.

Электронная книга "John James Audubon: The Making of an American", Richard Rhodes

Электронная книга "John James Audubon: The Making of an American", Richard Rhodes. Эту книгу можно прочитать в Google Play Книгах на компьютере, а также на устройствах Android и iOS. Выделяйте текст, добавляйте закладки и делайте заметки, скачав книгу "John James Audubon: The Making of an American" для чтения в офлайн-режиме.

John James Audubon came to America as a dapper eighteen-year-old eager to make his fortune

John James Audubon came to America as a dapper eighteen-year-old eager to make his fortune. The works of art he created gave the world its idea of America. Part biography, part natural history and part world history, "JJA: The Making of an American" is a book that will appeal to birders, obviously, but will also find a special place with anyone who loves to learn about where we came from as an American people.

John J. Audubon’s Birds of America. Photo: Susie Cushner. The images in our collection are provided courtesy of the John James Audubon Center at Mill Grove in Audubon, Pennsylvania, and the Montgomery County Audubon Collection. The life’s work of both a lover and observer of birds and nature. John James Audubon's Birds of America is a portal into the natural world. Learn more about the John James Audubon Center.

Richard Lee Rhodes (born July 4, 1937) is an American historian, journalist, and author of both fiction and non-fiction, including the Pulitzer Prize-winning The Making of the Atomic Bomb (1986), and most recently, Energy: A Human History (2018)

Richard Lee Rhodes (born July 4, 1937) is an American historian, journalist, and author of both fiction and non-fiction, including the Pulitzer Prize-winning The Making of the Atomic Bomb (1986), and most recently, Energy: A Human History (2018). Rhodes has been awarded grants from the Ford Foundation, the Guggenheim Foundation, the MacArthur Foundation, and the Alfred P. Sloan Foundation among others.

by Audubon & John James & Rhodes & Richard. So many books, so little time. The vision for civil engineering in 2025 : based on the Summit on the Future of Civil Engineering. 01 MB·2,535 Downloads·New!

The Making of an American

The Making of an American. The Making of an American. Also by Richard Rhodes. See all books by Richard Rhodes. About Richard Rhodes.

Includes bibliographical references (pages 481-489) Rhodes shows us young Audubon arriving in New York from France in 1803.

Includes bibliographical references (pages 481-489). The making of an American - America my country - The birds of America. From the Pulitzer Prize-winning historian Richard Rhodes, the first major biography of John James Audubon in forty years, and the first to illuminate fully the private and family life of the master illustrator of the natural world. Rhodes shows us young Audubon arriving in New York from France in 1803, his illegitimacy a painful secret, speaking no English but already drawing and observing birds.

From the Pulitzer Prize—winning historian Richard Rhodes, the first major biography of John James Audubon in forty years, and the first to illuminate fully the private and family life of the master illustrator of the natural world. Rhodes shows us young Audubon arriving in New York from France in 1803, his illegitimacy a painful secret,speaking no English but already drawing and observing birds. We see him falling in love, marrying the wellborn English girl next door, crossing the Appalachians to frontier Kentuckyto start a new life, fashioning himself into an American just as his adopted country was finding its identity.Here is Audubon exploring the wilderness of birds–pelicans wading the shallows of interior rivers, songbirds flocking, passenger pigeons darkening the skies–and teaching himself to revivify them in glorious life-size images. Now he finds his calling: to take his hundreds ofwatercolor drawings to England to be engraved in a great multivolume work called The Birds of America. Within weeks of his arrival there in 1826, he achieves remarkable celebrity as “the American Woodsman.” He publishes his major work as well as five volumes of bird biographies enhanced by his authentic descriptions of pioneer American life.Audubon’s story is an artist’s story but also a moving love story. In his day, communications by letter across the ocean were so slow and uncertain that John James and his wife, Lucy, almost lost each other in the three years when the Atlantic separated themuntil he crossed the Atlantic and half the American continent to claim her. Their letters during this time are intimate, moving, and painful, and they attest to an enduring love. We examine Audubon’s legacy of inspired observation–the sonorities of a wilderness now lost, the brash life of a new nation just inventing itself–precisely, truthfully, lyrically captured. And we see Audubon in the fullness of his years, made rich by his magnificent work, winning public honor: embraced by writers and scientists, fêted by presidents and royalty.Here is a revelation of Audubon as the major American artist he is. And here he emerges for the first time in his full humanity–handsome, charming, volatile, ambitious, loving, canny, immensely energetic. Richard Rhodes has given us an indispensable portrait of a true American icon.
Comments: (7)
Marr
This book is nothing short of MAGNIFICENT! Rhodes is an elegant writer who knows and loves his subject as well as history and gets it all right. This is more than the biography of one brilliant man; it is a history of frontier America in its early days and is populated with much more than birds. There are Indians, friends, enemies, 4-legged animals, and yes, loads and loads of American birds. The voyages back and forth from Europe to America are enlightening and amazing to think about. I knew next to nothing about birds when I bought this book; I bought it because of an interesting book review I read a couple of years ago.

There is another Audobon book that came out the same year, Under a Wild Sky by Souder, and I own that book, too. The Souder book was a finalist for the Pulitzer, but I really don't know how it could have been selected over this book by Richard Rhodes. For example, this book goes into all the details of Audubon's personal life right up to his last days on earth, whereas the Souder book covers most of it in a few paragraphs at the end of his book.

I LOVED this book! I had a couple of bird books next to my chair as I was reading (one, a condensed version of Audubon's Birds of America), and referred to them throughout reading, which was fun and very enlightening and educational. Audubon knew and loved his birds so well that he even wrote biographies of individual species, and indeed individual birds themselves! What could be more amazing than that?

This is a truly delicious book that I wish more people would read. Right now there are only 18 individual reviews, which is much less than this book should have. I always blame the publishers for not doing justice to the fabulous books they are entrusted with. Do yourself a favor and read this special book! It is about a great man, yes, but also covers so much more. In these days of being green, Audubon predicted (and saw the beginnings of) the sad ruination and ultimate demise of nature in all its forms, and that was in the early 1800s. He was a pioneer as well as a bright man, and a funny man, and a driven man who loved and adored his family and his birds.
Bodwyn
The life of John James Audubon could have been a historical novel. This West Indian French bastard survived revolutions, wars, earthquakes, floods, economic collapses, and epidemics. He called everywhere in North America, as well as Europe and the Caribbean, his home. He combined entrepreneurial skills with a love of the outdoors and the gifts of the naturalist and artist (not to mention hunter). His equally-amazing English-born wife Lucy took to the frontier as readily as he, raising a family and providing frontier hospitality wherever their fortunes took them.

A biographer or historian may lack a novelist's eye for the kinds of background details that make the past come alive to the reader. But Richard Rhodes has immersed himself in his subject's world. He's read everything, not only what Audubon himself wrote, but also what his family, acquaintances, and others who experienced the same things wrote. Suppose you'd been in New York City on 9/11 but hadn't written much about your experience. A future historian might use the descriptions by others who were there too to fill in the gaps. That's what Rhodes has done for Audubon.

Before this book, Rhodes was known for his Pulitzer-winning history of the development of the atomic bomb. Now he's known as Audubon's biographer, having edited the Everyman's Library edition of The Audubon Reader and contributed an introduction to the forthcoming Audubon: Early Drawings. This is a remarkable book by someone who really knows his subject, his period, and his craft as writer and historian.
adventure time
A wonderful history of one of the great natural history artists of America. It is sometimes difficult to reconcile the number of birds that are sacrificed in the process, but he lived in a different time. There was a great abundance of almost every species he recorded. Only later did the consequences of over hunting and disturbances of the wildness lead to extinction. It is a sad tale when thought about in those terms, but a brave and glorious journey of discovery by one extraordinary man.
Voodoogore
Is it just me or are all the Audubon biographies relentlessly depressing? Either we are hearing about his shooting or he is witnessing some atrocity in the wild. As a birder and appreciator of the natural world,I can hardly read these accounts of slaughter. And when it is not the birds or buffalo dying, it is the sweet Bachman daughters. I know times were hard then, but surely these biographers could have stuffed some cheer into those grim cracks of despair..... but no, the passenger pidgeon slaughter, the trail of tears, and other terrible events of the day are recorded. The book ends abruptly with Audubon dying and his wife melting down the precious etched plates and throwing out half or more of his journals, and selling off everything else. I mean, the man dedicated his life to drawing the birds of america and he wrote about every step of the way in his journals and she tosses them? It is beyond upsetting. The book is full of wonderful photo's of his art and pictures of his family. It is more focussed on his drawing than the other bio I read by Shreshinsky. But it still lacks bird information. It says he discovered a number of new birds but they don't say which ones... that sort of omission is not good in my opinion. But it may be that due to the loss of journals they don't know as much as they wish... in any case, it is worth reading, and well written.
Flas
Excellent in every way. No wonder it won Pulitzer Prize. The author's writing, research, the subject matter, and Audubon himself were spell binding to discover on every page. Too bad these committed, creative geniuses really, like Audubon, often do not get their recognition sooner in their lifetimes, if at all. Read the book and be inspired. Proud that he became an American.
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