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eBook The Diary of Anais Nin, Vol. 6: 1955-1966 epub

by Anais Nin,Gunther Stuhlmann

eBook The Diary of Anais Nin, Vol. 6: 1955-1966 epub
  • ISBN: 0151255946
  • Author: Anais Nin,Gunther Stuhlmann
  • Genre: Biographies
  • Subcategory: Arts & Literature
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: Harcourt; 1St Edition edition (May 1976)
  • Pages: 464 pages
  • ePUB size: 1344 kb
  • FB2 size 1994 kb
  • Formats doc txt lrf lrf


Anais Nin. Nin continues her debate on the use of drugs versus the artist's imagination, portrays many famous people in the arts, and recounts her visits to Sweden, the Brussels World's Fair, Paris, and Venice.

Anais Nin. Издательство: Houghton Mifflin Harcourt;Mariner Books.

Start by marking The Diary of Anaïs Nin, Vol. 6: 1955-1966 as. .Mostly it is Anaïs Nin continuing to print/distribute her books, then she meets Alan Swallow, who later connects her with Harcourt-Brace. 6: 1955-1966 as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read.

Anaïs Nin was an amazing woman. This book captures her essence through get personal collection of her own notes, ramblings and reflections.

by. Anaïs Nin (Author). Find all the books, read about the author, and more. Are you an author? Learn about Author Central. ISBN-13: 978-0156260282. Anaïs Nin was an amazing woman.

The diary of Anaïs Nin. (A Harvest/HBJ book). CONTENTS: 1955–1966. 1. Nin, Anaïs, 1903–1977-Diaries. 2. Authors, American-20th century-Biography. I. Stuhlmann, Gunther. gave me their own courage and energy. During the summer of 1965, while plans for the publication of her diaries were taking definite shape, Anaïs Nin had a dream which, in symbolic shorthand, seemed to project her ambivalence about finally exposing her great undertaking to the world. When, in her dream, she opened the door of her house, she was struck by a blinding flash of light-by "mortal radiation," as she recorded it.

Format Paperback 432 pages. Dimensions 13. x 21. x 2. 9mm 56. 5g. Publication date 31 Dec 1977. Publisher Mariner Books. The Diary of Anais Nin: Vol 4. Anais Nin. 01 Apr 1980. Close X. Learn about new offers and get more deals by joining our newsletter.

The Diary of Anaïs Nin, Vol. 5: 1947-1955. by Anaïs Nin · Gunther Stuhlmann. Written when Anaïs Nin was in her twenties and living in Louveciennes, France, these stories contain many elements that will delight her readers: details remembered from childhood, of life in Paris, the cafés, theatres; characters including dancers, art. Nearer the Moon: From A Journal of Love - The Unexpurgated Diary of Anaïs Nin (1937-1939).

Nin continues her debate on the use of drugs versus the artist's imagination, portrays many famous people in the arts.

Anaïs Nin continues one of the most remarkable diaries in the history of letters with this volume covering more than a decade of her midcentury life (Los Angeles Times)

Anaïs Nin continues one of the most remarkable diaries in the history of letters with this volume covering more than a decade of her midcentury life (Los Angeles Times). She debates the use of drugs versus the artist’s imagination; portrays many famous people in the arts; and recounts her visits to Sweden, the Brussels World’s Fair, Paris, and Venice. looks at life, love, and art with a blend of gentility and acuity that is rare in contemporary writing. Diaries & Letters Fiction Biographies.

The Diary of Anaïs Nin is the published version of Anaïs Nin's own private manuscript diary, which she began at age 11 in 1914 during a trip from Europe to New York with her mother and two brothers

The Diary of Anaïs Nin is the published version of Anaïs Nin's own private manuscript diary, which she began at age 11 in 1914 during a trip from Europe to New York with her mother and two brothers. Anaïs Nin would later say she had begun the diary as a letter to her father, Cuban composer Joaquín Nin, who had abandoned the family a few years earlier. Over the years, the diary would become Anaïs Nin's best friend and confidante.

The final volume ends as the author wished-not with her last two years of pain but at a joyous, reflective moment on a trip to Bali. "One of the most remarkable diaries in the history of letters" (Robert Kirsch, Los Angeles Times). Edited and with a Preface by Gunther Stuhlmann; Index; photographs.
Comments: (7)
Nargas
I've only recently begun to read Anais Nin. Her writing is simply arresting.
She displays a character that one doesn't encounter these days. I wish I'd known her.
Her work is descriptive, entertaining and thought provoking.
Flocton
The first of seven volumes that have been produced so far, this is probably the best-known of Anais Nin's diaries. The first three-quarters of it centers largely on her relationship with writer Henry Miller and his wife June. I've never seen the movie "Henry and June", which was adapted from these diaries, but I mean to get to it someday.

Nin, the daughter of Cuban pianist Joaquin Nin and singer Rosa Culmell, started keeping a diary when, as a young girl, she traveled with her mother and brother to New York from Europe after her father abandoned the family for one of his mistresses. On the ship she began a letter to her father describing their experiences, which was never sent and instead marked the beginning of a lifelong project of meticulously documenting her life.

At the beginning of this diary, in 1931, Nin is back in France, where she was born, and has just finished her biography of D.H. Lawrence, whose writing she felt had so profoundly changed her life that she wanted to pay homage to him. She writes:

"You live like this, sheltered, in a delicate world, and you believe you are living. Then you read a book (Lady Chatterley, for instance), or you take a trip...and you discover that you are not living, that you are hibernating. The symptoms of hibernating are easily detectable: first, restlessness. The second symptom (when hibernating becomes dangerous and might degenerate into death): absence of pleasure. That is all. It appears like an innocuous illness. Monotony, boredom, death. Millions live like this (or die like this) without knowing it. They work in offices. They drive a car. They picnic with their families. They raise children. And then some shock treatment takes place, a person, a book, a song, and it awakens them and saves them from death."

Soon after this she meets Henry Miller, and the beginning of a relationship that would last decades, long after each of their marriages had ended (and others still lay ahead). They inspired each other in part because their writing was so vastly different: his stark, brutal and crude, hers veiled and baroque, but both probing and sensual in their own fashions.

Towards the end of the diary, in 1933-34, Anais becomes fascinated with psychoanalysis, which as a practice and theory had steadily become more popular in the decades since Freud. It seems a natural progression for a woman who had spent so many years scrutinizing the lives and experiences of everyone around her to finally turn the mirror around on herself, and she does this in a way that is admirable without being punishing or overly neurotic. The way she examines herself is unflinching but not melodramatic:

"My greatest fear is that people will become aware that I am fragile, not a full-blown woman physically, that I am emotionally vulnerable, that I have small [...] like a girl. And so I cover all this up with understanding, wisdom, interest in others, with my mind's agility, with my writing, my reading: I cover the woman up, to reveal only the artist, the confessor, the friend, the mother, the sister."

"I have always been tormented by the image of multiplicity of selves. Some days I call it richness, and other days I see it as a disease, a proliferation as dangerous as cancer. My first concept about people around me was that all of them were coordinated into a WHOLE, whereas I was made up of a multitude of selves, of fragments. I know that I was upset as a child to discover that we had only one life."

Through analysis she also finally faces the deep trauma her father's abandonment had caused and its influence on her adult life. Although they had actually become quite close as adults, she realized that they had forever lost something irretrievable:

"My father comes when I no longer need a father. I am walking into a Coney Island trick house. The ground gives way under my feet. It is the ironies which swallow the ground and leave one dizzy and stranded. Irony of loves never properly timed, of tragedies that should not be tragedies, of passions which miss each other as if aimed by blind men, of blind cruelties and even blinder loves, of incongruities and deceptive fulfillments. Every realization is not a culmination but a delusion. The pattern seems to come to an end and it is only another knot. My father comes when I have gone beyond him; he is given to me when I no longer need him, when I am free of him. In every fulfillment there is a mockery which runs ahead of me like a gust of wind, always ahead."

As this volume ends she has begun her own brief career as an analyst, but soon realizes that she wants to concentrate full-time on her writing. Miller's `Tropic of Cancer', considered his magnus opus and something Nin was deeply involved with (she was Miller's primary muse and editor), has just been accepted for publication, and this inspires her further. She writes intensely and painfully about a pregnancy and stillbirth experience, and makes plans to return to New York to work with Otto Rank, the famed analyst under whom she'd first been a patient, then a student. Volume Two picks up at this point.

I'm not usually quite so verbose with my reviews. I was just very moved by Nin's writing and her way of expressing herself, which could so easily come across as neurotic but never does because she never exudes self-pity or obsesses narcissistically about herself. She just is who she is, and I love the way she doesn't want to miss anything, refuses to draw a box around herself, lives a life outside of conventional norms, and isn't afraid to face her own demons. Or rather, she might be afraid, but does it anyway.
Orll
It is a wonderful narrative. She is allowing you into her world and her psyche. Amazingly deep insights on life and herself. If you're buying it just because she is known for her erotic works you are truly missing the point. I absolutely think her insights are brilliant!
Clandratha
She has the woman's voice, the inner voice that tells the truth, the real feelings on paper- that we all have, wwtho we never dare to share it. It is not written to be funny, universally truthful, or even wise, as she shows her mistakes in life, her mistakes in love, as well as stunning insights. She stands as a pioneer to proclaim the of the value of a woman's insights and feelings to the literary and artistic movement of her time.
Saimath
I've read and loved all of these. this is a reread. Was glad to have it again. It will go in my permanent library.
Gadar
Throughout her lifetime, Nin considered her diary to be her closest friend and confident. Through her diary she was able to express many things that she could not possibly say out loud - including events so shocking that they would not be published until after the death of her first husband. While this version of the diary was heavily edited and rewritten by the author prior to publication, what remains is an in-depth look of someone who lived a remarkable life both as an artist and as a woman.
Leyl
Anaïs Nin was an amazing woman. This book captures her essence through get personal collection of her own notes, ramblings and reflections.
This is an extremely slow read. About five percent of it is French. Not enough to disturb the flow. Her style of journaling is story-like. I admired her depth and honesty. It was a bit dredging at times but this was her personal diary so I muddled through it. Much analysis but interestingly so.
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