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eBook Lost Splendor: The Amazing Memoirs of the Man Who Killed Rasputin epub

by Prince Felix Youssoupoff

eBook Lost Splendor: The Amazing Memoirs of the Man Who Killed Rasputin epub
  • ISBN: 1885586582
  • Author: Prince Felix Youssoupoff
  • Genre: Biographies
  • Subcategory: Historical
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: Turtle Point Press (October 2003)
  • Pages: 300 pages
  • ePUB size: 1219 kb
  • FB2 size 1909 kb
  • Formats lrf txt mobi rtf


Prince Youssoupoff was an aristocrat of character. Felix made his name, fame, and living on being the man who killed Rasputin.

Prince Youssoupoff was an aristocrat of character. When the moment for action came, when the monk's evil influence over the czar and czarina became unbearable, he and his friends decided that they must get rid of the monster. He tells how Rasputin courted him and tried to hypnotize him, and how finally they decoyed him to the basement of the prince's palace.

Prince Felix Yousssoupoff is best known as one of the murderers of Gregory Rasputin just before the Russian Revolution. He was a member of one of Russia's most aristocratic families, and in this memoir, originally published in the 1950s, he gives us a glimpse of life for a nobleman in pre-Revolutionary Russia. Life was certainly rich, if not always good, for Prince Felix. A more open and informative biography of Prince Felix, The Man Who Killed Rasputin, by Greg King, was published several years ago and will help fill in the gaps left by Felix's own work. 58 people found this helpful.

Lost Splendor: The Amazing Memoirs of the Man Who Killed Rasputin. I agree when King says "we will never know with any certainty the true nature of the events of that night at the Moika Palace", but the source for crucial pieces of his "evidence" is shoddy at best. A story he heard from someone who heard it from the sister-in-law of one of Felix's servants. Really? I can't believe he had the nerve to quote this in a serious history book.

First published in 1953, this is the memoir of Prince Felix Youssoupoff. Married to a niece of the Tsar, he killed the powerful monk Rasputin with the aid of his cousin-by-marriage, Grand Duke Dimitri, because they felt Rasputin's reputation was becoming a danger to the Romanoff dynasty.

by Prince Youssoupoff (Author), Felix Youssoupoff (Author). The "splendor" part was easy to believe. Felix Yousupov killed Rasputin and freely admitted it, but he was an important royal person and escaped punishment. The killing process was amazing. The background for both the Count and Rasputin is fascinating. What a tempestuous time it was. Good book.

Born to great riches, master of vast feudal estates and many palaces, Felix Youssoupoff led the life of a grand . More than any other single event, the assassination of Rasputin helped to bring about the cataclysmic upheaval that ended in the advent of the Soviet regime

Born to great riches, master of vast feudal estates and many palaces, Felix Youssoupoff led the life of a grand lord in the days before the Russian Revolution. Married to a niece of Czar Nicholas II, he could observe at close range the rampant corruption and intrigues of the imperial court, which culminated in the rise to power of the sinister monk Rasputin. More than any other single event, the assassination of Rasputin helped to bring about the cataclysmic upheaval that ended in the advent of the Soviet regime. In 1919, the Youssoupoffs left Russia. They sold two Rembrandt paintings (now in the National Gallery in Washington), as well as Princess Irina's jewelry.

Prince Felix Youssoupoff . Prince Felix Yusupov, one of Imperial Russia’s richest and most beautiful men. Assassin of Grigori Rasputin. These records have been published and M. Gilliard, the Tsarevich’s tutor, has told the whole story in his book The Tragic Fate of Nicholas II. - Prince Felix Youssoupoff, Lost Splendor.

Bibliographic Details. Title: Lost Splendor: The Amazing Memoirs of the. In business since 1986!) We specialize in literature, history, art, and children's books, and carry used, rare and new books. Publisher: Van Rees Press, New York, New York. Publication Date: 1954. Book Condition: Very Good. Dust Jacket Condition: Very Good. We have over 250,000 books in our open shop, in almost any catagory.

Born to great riches, lord of vast feudal estates and many palaces, Felix Youssoupoff led the life of a grand seigneur in the days before the Russian Revolution

Born to great riches, lord of vast feudal estates and many palaces, Felix Youssoupoff led the life of a grand seigneur in the days before the Russian Revolution.

The autobiography of the man who killed Rasputin. Prince Felix Youssoupoff was married to a niece of Tsar Nicholas II. More than any other single event, the assassination of Rasputin helped to bring about the cataclysmic upheaval that ended in the advent of the Soviet regime.

Comments: (7)
SmEsH
I was reluctant to read this book for two reasons (1) It is translated from the French version and (2) it was written in 1953. I was delighted to find this book is well written, focused and a reasonable interpretation of the facts from any eye witness to history. Some of the events, may have been embellished by the author, such as the murder of Rasputin, but otherwise Felix Youssoupoff knew the personalities of the people involved and does a fine job in telling the story. I especially liked the parts of the book wherein Felix Y describes himself dressing as a beautiful women and going to the private clubs in St. Petersburg. Yet he was married for 60 years. I rate this book excellent and superb.
Makaitist
A initmate view of a family who lost everything overnight when the new political regime came into power. It's painful to read
how they were treated & how little respect was shown for private property. Part of the downfall, so they claim, was the
friendship between the dutiful Tzarina & the monk Rasputin. Things came to a head in politics & with the help of God Prince
Youssoupoff left Russia in one piece with his life- Hard to beat especially since the Imperial family paid the highest price.
Curiouser & curiouser.....
Arilak
Prince Felix Yousssoupoff is best known as one of the murderers of Gregory Rasputin just before the Russian Revolution. He was a member of one of Russia's most aristocratic families, and in this memoir, originally published in the 1950s, he gives us a glimpse of life for a nobleman in pre-Revolutionary Russia.
Life was certainly rich, if not always good, for Prince Felix. As a younger son, he was given very little education and basically allowed to do as he pleased during his formative years. Most of the time what he was pleased to do was to get into trouble. I lost count of the number of servants, governesses, and other retainers who quit with nervous breakdowns after trying to look after Felix. Under the influence of his elder brother, whom he adored, Felix had an early initiation into sexual and other kinds of debauchery. He enjoyed dressing as a woman and living the high life in St. Petersburg, London, and Paris. Felix was reticent about his sexuality, claiming several affairs with women but speaking more warmly about his men friends, including Grand Duke Dmitri, who helped him murder Rasputin. When Felix's brother was killed in a duel Felix became the heir to a vast fortune. He married Tsar Nicholas' niece Irina, whom he claimed to adore but otherwise said little about.
The most interesting parts of this book deal with Rasputin, whom Felix met several times. Typically, Felix hints that there was a sexual nature to these encounters, but divulges few details. Felix describes the murder and his subsequent exile, which saved him from being in St. Petersburg during the February Revolution in 1917, and his internment in the Crimea with other members of the Imperial Family from 1917 through 1919, when he escaped on a British warship.
This book is interesting but highly reticent. Felix never loses a chance to glamorize himself and his activities, with the result that some undeniably brave actions, like his several trips to St. Petersburg to rescue treasures while the Bolshevik terror was at its height, tend to get less attention than they deserve. A more open and informative biography of Prince Felix, The Man Who Killed Rasputin, by Greg King, was published several years ago and will help fill in the gaps left by Felix's own work.
Unh
Had read this many years ago and found it very interesting.
Wymefw
Throughly enjoyed this book, very informative.
Cargahibe
A perfect gift for anyone who's been
or is going to St. Petersburg. Why have I never heard of this wonderful book? It's filled with intrigue, braggadocio, and utterly shocking revelations. How comforting it is
to know that Prince Felix escaped the Revolution so that he could write this book.. Buy it!
Mr.Bean
A very interesting book.
Book provided additional insight into the lives of the Russian nobility. Easy to read and very enjoyable.
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