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eBook Queen Victoria's Gene (History) epub

by W. T. W. Potts,D. M. Potts

eBook Queen Victoria's Gene (History) epub
  • ISBN: 0750908688
  • Author: W. T. W. Potts,D. M. Potts
  • Genre: Biographies
  • Subcategory: Historical
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: Sutton Pub Ltd (June 1, 1996)
  • Pages: 160 pages
  • ePUB size: 1930 kb
  • FB2 size 1473 kb
  • Formats lit docx txt mbr


QUEEN VICTORIA’S GENE HAEMOPHILIA AND THE ROYAL FAMILY .

QUEEN VICTORIA’S GENE HAEMOPHILIA AND THE ROYAL FAMILY .

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Discover new books on Goodreads. Potts’s Followers (1). . Queen Victoria's Gene: Haemophilia and the Royal Family by.

Queen Victoria's son, Prince Leopold, died from haemophilia, but no member of the royal family before his generation had suffered from the condition. However the haemophilia gene arose, it had a profound effect on history. Medically, there are only two possibilities: either one of Victoria's parents had a 1 in 50,000 random mutation, or Victoria was the illegitimate child of a haemophiliac man. Two of Victoria's daughters were silent carriers who passed the disease to the Spanish and Russian royal families.

Queen Victoria's Gene : Haemophilia and the Royal Family.

Queen Victoria's son, Prince Leopold, died from hemophilia, but no member of the royal family before his generation had suffered from the condition. Queen Victoria's Gene : Haemophilia and the Royal Family.

However the haemophilia gene arose, it had a profound effect on history.

Author:Potts, W. T. W. Queen Victoria's Gene (History). Book Binding:Hardback. Publisher:The History Press Ltd. We appreciate the impact a good book can have. We all like the idea of saving a bit of cash, so when we found out how many good quality used books are out there - we just had to let you know! Read full description. See details and exclusions. Queen Victoria's Gene by W. Potts, D. M. Potts (Hardback, 1995). Pre-owned: lowest price.

M. Potts, W. Potts. The only book to investigate the sudden appearance of the haemophilia gene in the Royal Family

M. The only book to investigate the sudden appearance of the haemophilia gene in the Royal Family.

Potts, D. M; Potts, W. (William Taylor Windle). Victoria, Queen of Great Britain, 1819-1901, Victoria, Queen of Great Britain, 1819-1901, Saxe-Coburg-Gotha (House of), Victoria, Queen of Great Britain, Victoria, Queen of Great Britain, 1819-1901, Hemophilia, Diseases and history, Royal households, Diseases and history, Families, Health, Hemophilia, Kings and rulers, Kings and rulers. Books for People with Print Disabilities. Internet Archive Books. Uploaded by Lotu Tii on February 4, 2015.

Potts does look at Victoria's parents

Potts does look at Victoria's parents. The gene was passed along to three of her children; one son suffered from the disease and two daughters were carriers. The two daughters carried the gene by marriage into the Russian and Spanish royal houses. Potts does a good job in showing how the hemophilia of the tsarvich Alexei basically destroyed the last Romanov tsar and his family. This book is really partly a discussion on how Victoria passed on a gene for Haemophilia and its immense influence on later European politics, but also hugely influential, and not included in the title, were the overweening ambitions of Leopold in the scheme of European Royalty.

Queen Victoria's Gene is the first extended scientific examination of the history of haemophilia in the royal families of Europe. The book asks where the disease came from and what effect it had on history, and in so doing it presents some startling new perspectives.Queen Victoria's son, Prince Leopold, died from haemophilia, but no member of the royal family before his generation had suffered from this very visible condition. Medically, there are only two possibilities: either one of Victoria's parents had a 1 in 50,000 random mutation, or Victoria was the illegitimate child of a haemophiliac man.However the haemophilia gene arose, it had a profound effect on history. Two of Victoria's daughters were silent carriers who passed the disease to the Spanish and Russian royal families. The disease played a role in the origin of the Spanish Civil War; and the tsarina's concern over her only son's haemophilia led to the entry of Rasputin into the royal household, contributing directly to the Russian Revolution.Finally, if Queen Victoria was illegitimate, who should have inherited the British throne? The answer is astonishing.
Comments: (7)
Tamesya
A couple of weeks ago, I read and reviewed a new book by British author Deborah Cadbury, "Queen Victoria's Matchmaking: The Royal Marriages that Shaped Europe". The book was excellent and while Cadbury didn't write much about the hemophilia gene, I became curious about it. Looking through Amazon, I found this book, "Queen Victoria's Gene: Hemophilia and The Royal Family"., by DM Potts. Published in the 1990's, the book is well-written in a sort of wandering way through Victoria's life and those of her children and grandchildren.

The gene for hemophilia was either passed down to Victoria by her father or it spontaneously appeared in her gene pool. Potts does look at Victoria's parents. The gene was passed along to three of her children; one son suffered from the disease and two daughters were carriers. The two daughters carried the gene by marriage into the Russian and Spanish royal houses. Potts does a good job in showing how the hemophilia of the tsarvich Alexei basically destroyed the last Romanov tsar and his family. Potts writes more about the Russian revolution and the fate of Nicholas, Alexandra, and their four kids. I mentioned the publication date above because information about the murders and the dispersal of the bodies was not well-known til after this book was published. That's a problem with reading a book that is almost 20 years old and is certainly not the fault of the author. DM Potts wrote what was known at the time.

DM Potts book is shortish and was a good read after Cadbury's longer book. I'd advise both books to the Victoria-fanatic!
Eigonn
a quick read, and entertaining but doesn't really follow through on its title. very little of the book is actually about the appearance of hemophilia in victoria's line; some of it is an abbreviated story of her family, some of it is a primer on genetics, some of it is a description of family members who inherited it. but the "hook" that induced me to buy this book was the connection between victoria and hemophilia, and about this the book has only mild speculation. where did she get the gene? the author suggests maybe from an unknown "real" father; but surely such speculation is irresponsible without some evidence? of which there is none.
Rit
good reading -
Dorilune
This book was very interesting. It is a story of Genes. It tells the story about Queen Victoria and her family. Two of her daughters, Alice (As well as two daughters and a son), and Beatrice (as well as two sons and a daughter) were carriers of a disease called hemophilia and her son Leopold (As well as a daughter) had the disorder. One might wonder what the mystery is about it. Well it is this, where did the three children get the disorder? Because the daughters were carriers of it they could not have gotten it from there father Albert, so it must have been Victoria. One problem is that supposedly comes from one the most well documented families off all time (The family can trace there lineage to Adam and Eve) that leaves three posiblities-1. That she is not the Granddaughter of King George III 2. Her mother (Victoria of Sax-Coburg) was a carrier-which turned out to be false or 3. There was a spontaneous combustion of the egg or sperm that made Victoria. The authors get into all three of these hypotheses in order to try to understand just how Victoria got the gene for hemophilia. The authors also delve into the lives of the people who had hemophilia and tells about some of the pretenders to the thrones descendent from Queen Victoria and how with the knowledge of the gene people have figured out they are fakes.
Washington
I wanted to learn more about hemophilia and the royal family bloodline as to how it was passed down to her children and grandchildren. This book elucidated this information. I found it enlightening. Thank you.
Agamaginn
love this for my wife
Xcorn
This was a fascinating read, about how history was hugely influenced by this genetic anomaly.
This book is really partly a discussion on how Victoria passed on a gene for Haemophilia and its immense influence on later European politics, but also hugely influential, and not included in the title, were the overweening ambitions of Leopold in the scheme of European Royalty.
Following his marriage to The heir to the English throne, Princess Charlotte, in 1817 I had thought he had faded out of existence, he was hardly a major player, so to speak, in the scheme of things then. I had forgotten his connection with Queen Victoria's mother, and it was again Leopold's influence which made Prince Albert, Victoria's husband - and then he really got workin on Europe for his relatives - even Brazil and Mexico got Leopold dynastic ambitions during their brief flirtations with the monarchy.
The first chapter is really an introduction of Leopold but it is mainly in this first part that the genetics of Queen Victoria are examined. Where did the gene for Haemophilia arise and why, after generations of pophyria in the royal family (traced back for hundreds of years) was there a sudden stop to this,and rise to a completely new genetic disease. I don't know that the authors really made their point. I thought the discussion was interesting but the conclusions were a bit tenuous. In the end there was no possible candidate for the male haemophiliac who could have been Victoria's father. It is all very well discussion all the possibilities of how a gene might transfer from generation to generation but it would have been more convincing if they could have really put up some candidates - or at least one viable candidate anyway.
The influence of the gene on later generations of European royalty was quite profound and I thought that was presented well by the book. I really enjoyed the chapter by chapter presentation of the gene's movements through other royal families in Europe as well as its still possible presence in the lesser branches of the Spanish Royal family. Each royal family or incident is presented as a single chapter and the ramifications are simply discussed. Certainly the guiding hand of Leopold on each succeeding generation is still very comprehensive.
I wish the authors had used more, or better Family trees though. There were an awful lot of names and relationships to follow and not all were even represented in a family tree at all. Also finding the family trees to refer back to them was pretty awkward at times as they were scattered through the book.
I don't know that this is really an academic book for those that are interested in royal watching. It doesn't present itself as well as it might. The conclusions are often very vague - if there are conclusions at all. However as a start point for a slightly different look at the influence of Victoria, and Leopold on European royalty it is definitely worth dipping in to. I probably would have given it 3 and a half stars rather than 3 given the choice, but it isn't a brilliant book - just interesting.
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