» » Richard III, Vol. 1: The Young King To Be

eBook Richard III, Vol. 1: The Young King To Be epub

by Josephine Wilkinson

eBook Richard III, Vol. 1: The Young King To Be epub
  • ISBN: 1848685130
  • Author: Josephine Wilkinson
  • Genre: Biographies
  • Subcategory: Historical
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: Amberley Publishing (October 15, 2009)
  • Pages: 336 pages
  • ePUB size: 1230 kb
  • FB2 size 1423 kb
  • Formats docx lrf mobi azw


Start reading Richard III: The Young King To Be on your Kindle in under a minute. I literally could not stop reading this book until I had completed it. Ms. Wilkinson has an unfailing ability to dramatize history: there are no sleep-inducing, dry passages in this book!

Start reading Richard III: The Young King To Be on your Kindle in under a minute.

Josephine Wilkinson is an author and historian.

A major new biography of the young Richard II.

A major new biography of the young Richard III. Richard III is a paradox - the most hated of English kings, yet the most beloved, a deeply pious man, yet materialistic to the point of obsession, puritan, yet the father of at least two illegitimate children. From the insignificant younger brother of a would-be king to Knight of the Garter, duke, respected soldier and loyal supporter to Edward IV, Richard faced extreme danger and heady triumph, poverty and abundance, neglect and acclamation as the House of York rose to the heights of power and propelled him a glorious career at Court.

This book starts slowly but it rewards patience Dr Josephine Wilkinson received a First Class Honours degree from the University of Newcastle.

Jan 17, 2009 Ikonopeiston rated it it was ok. Recommends it for: no one. Shelves: non-fiction, ricardian. This book starts slowly but it rewards patience. The name is somewhat of a misnomer since no one knows exactly how Richard spent his childhood nor how any youngster, especially of noble blood did. But the interesting part is how Wilkinson explains the history around Richard's childhood. At times she psychologizes, which I didn't like, but it's her book. Dr Josephine Wilkinson received a First Class Honours degree from the University of Newcastle.

Richard III is a paradox - the most hated of English kings, yet the most beloved, a deeply pious man, yet materialistic to the point of obsession, puritan, yet the father of at. .Books related to Richard III - The Young King To Be. Skip this list. Richard III - A Small Guide to the Great Debate.

Richard III is a paradox - the most hated of English kings, yet the most beloved, a deeply pious man, yet materialistic to the point of obsession, puritan, yet the father of at least two illegitimate children. This new biography concentrates on the much neglected early part of Richards life - from his birth in 1452 as a cadet of the House of York to his marriage to the beautiful Anne Neville - and shows how his experiences as the son of an ambitious duke, a prisoner of war, an exile, his knightly training and awe of his elder brother, King Edward. A major new biography of the young Richard III.

Richard III is a paradox - the most hated of English kings, yet the most beloved, a deeply pious man, yet materialistic to the point of obsession, puritan, yet the father of at least two illegitimate children

Richard III is a paradox - the most hated of English kings, yet the most beloved, a deeply pious man, yet materialistic to the point of obsession, puritan, yet the father of at least two illegitimate children.

Richard III, The Young King To Be is the first volume of what will be a two volume biography of Richard III, the second volume will be published in 2010. Country of Publication.

Should all books that are mentioned in the citations be included . I've put them in a sub-section below for the time being

Should all books that are mentioned in the citations be included . Josephine Wilkinson's "Richard the young king to be"? Some books are strictly on Richard, others are not (. we have 3 on the War od the Roses, 2 on Anne Neville, 1 on George of Clarence, et., my opinion is the bibliography should only list books on Richard. Some qualified books on Richard are not listed, . I've put them in a sub-section below for the time being. Key tasks (dull, but essential) appear to be

If we are to believe John Nichols, an epitaph for Richard was planned and written.

Richard III’s Burial Place by Josephine Wilkinson. Posted By Claire on February 4, 2013. Thank you to historian and author Josephine Wilkinson for sharing this article that she wrote back in 2006 about Richard III’s burial place. If we are to believe John Nichols, an epitaph for Richard was planned and written. The historian claims to have seen a copy of it in a ‘recorded manuscript book chained to a table in a chamber on the Guildhall of London’, the text of which, translated into English reads

A major new biography of the young Richard III.Richard III is a paradox - the most hated of English kings, yet the most beloved, a deeply pious man, yet materialistic to the point of obsession, puritan, yet the father of at least two illegitimate children. This new biography concentrates on the much neglected early part of Richard's life - from his birth in 1452 as a cadet of the House of York to his marriage to the beautiful Anne Neville - and shows how his experiences as the son of an ambitious duke, a prisoner of war, an exile, his knightly training and awe of his elder brother, King Edward IV, shaped the character of England's most controversial monarch. From the insignificant younger brother of a would-be king to Knight of the Garter, duke, respected soldier and loyal supporter to Edward IV, Richard faced extreme danger and heady triumph, poverty and abundance, neglect and acclamation as the House of York rose to the heights of power and propelled him a glorious career at Court.
Comments: (7)
Chi
However richer in citations than her mentor's selfreferenced books, Wilkinson simply walks in Hicks' footsteps in the many negative, and already manyfold debunked, allegations on Richard as Duke of Gloucester.

Do not be taken in by the hint at Richard's marriage to the "beautiful Anne Neville" in 1472 in the product description. Wilkinson's take is that it was a match entirely based on interest despite the documented fact that Richard had been granted the Neville estates of Middleham, Penrith and Sheriff Hutton in the summer of 1471 and that he renounced most other lands and the Office of Great Chamberlain to win his brother George's final consent to the marriage to Anne in 1472. So why mention the several records documenting Richard showering his "most dearly beloved consort" with gifts if this can further disprove the author's theory?

Her allegations on Richard's supposed mistress/es after his marriage are based on the assumption that his 2 acknowledged illegitimate children were born after his marriage in 1472, which shows this author cannot even count up to 9 (months of pregnancy). His bastard daughter Katherine was wedded in 1484, age of consent was 12, even if she had been born in 1472 she would have been conceived before his wedding (papal dispensation dates 22 April 1472), as for John, most historians including Baldwin and Ashdown-Hill (quoting Kendall in such an antiricardian context would be a waste) think he was at least 16-17 when he was appointed Captain of Calais with the letter patent dated 11th March 1485: this military position had been held by the Kingmaker, it would have been an impossible charge for a child aged 12 or less, but possible for an age (16) when Clarence had been declared of age by Edward IV or (17) when RIchard himself had his first indipendent command. To support her view, Wilkinson chooses not to mention Richard's several externations against adultery which was a mortal sin for a pious prince, as opposed to a bachelor's fornication up to his 19's and during the many wars and exile months.

Hicks' imprinting is also evident in Wilkinson's descritpion of Richard's "ruthless acquisitiveness" at a time when everybody, including his own brother George of Clarence, proved to be far more ruthless in providing themselves with the means to sustain their household and above all their retinue and military duties towards the king. It sounds like comparing this medieval king's supposed intake of around one bottle of medieval wine a day at a time when water was undrinkable unless you were looking for plague and compare it to a contemporary peasant's diet and our modern socially accepted alcohol consumption, thus ending up suggesting the king was a drunkard...

I understand a second book will follow to cover Richard's years from his accession to the throne until his demise at Bosworth. If this is the prequel, get ready for one more account on the crouchback murderous Shakesperean monster.
Hystana
This is a detailed account of Richard's life through 1475, and provides an excellent background of these early years. As a more scholarly work, it may not appeal to those readers not already familiar with the period of Richard III. But for those who are, what a treasure trove, especially for Ricardians.

The Picture Section is wonderful and a great collection, especially for those readers who have never seen many of the locations associated with Richard. It is excellent to find them gathered in one place.

Also, don't overlook the appendix, "The Literature of Hate", which follows the notes after the Picture Section. This is a great discussion of the biases of the historians, contemporary and later, who have written of Richard.
FLIDER
Good history story of Richard III; he still is guilty as hell of ordering the murder of the young Princes in the Tower. He is the only one with the authority to do that. I toured the Tower once and the Yoeman Warder (Beefeater) who conducted the tour took us to the steps where the two bodies of the young males were discovered in 1630`~. Wonder who they could have been since their age was almost identical of the two young princes? Richard was very close to his brother the king Edward IV , I am sure he felt like he would lose his position and wealth and maybe his life with the death of Edward, and the new young king who was supposed to be close to the Woodville family of his mother. I wonder if anyone has done DNA testing on the two young princes since Richards body was discovered and his true believers in the Society have tried to rehab him. ? The book doesn't answer that but any objective reader will understand that Richard III, while maybe not as vile has Shakespeare wrote of him, is still guilty as hell.
Nikok
Very good book. It's a biography of his early years before becoming King. I recommend it for anyone who wants to know what he was like.
sergant
For a long time Ricardian I am leery of new biographies on this last Plantagenet king; however, Wilkinson has impressed me with her research, her big view juxtaposed against the more minute, or intimate, details of an issue; she has done her homework and is neither condescending to the reader (ie.Hicks, for just one) nor drifts into romantic flights of conjecture. She has produced a readable, engrossing biography that explains where Richard came from, the insignificant youngest son of a attainted duke, and concludes once he has established his improbable role, by 1475, as "Lord of the North" for his brother, Edward IV.

I highly recommend this book, both for its grasp of the sources that are available but have apparently been overlooked, and for its effort to portray a contextual Richard. I can only hope that the author is now working on the later years of Richard of Gloucester; I fully expect she will pursue the full events behind the execution of George Duke of Clarence and the pivotal machinations of Henry Stafford, Duke of Buckingham.
Faebei
This book is an essential read for anyone fascinated by Richard III. Chock full of detailed, meticulously researched information, it also has the great virtue of the writer's logical and intellectually honed mind to put the facts together with brilliant analysis.

I literally could not stop reading this book until I had completed it. Ms. Wilkinson has an unfailing ability to dramatize history: there are no sleep-inducing, dry passages in this book!

I'm anxious for Volume Two!!!
Worla
Excellent, much background on Richard never before seen. Josephine absolves him of murdering the boys. Yet she calls his marriage illegal. Marie Bamfield in the Ricardian goes over the canon law in detail. Richard's marriage was legal.
It stops after Richard's disagreement with his brother re the Anglo French agreement. Fine as far as it went but not a convincing argument for Richard's reason for claiming the throne, as the brothers remained on good terms, in spite of their differences until Edward's death.
eBooks Related to Richard III, Vol. 1: The Young King To Be
Contacts | Privacy Policy | DMCA
All rights reserved.
lycee-pablo-picasso.fr © 2016-2020