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eBook Anne Neville: Queen to Richard III (England's Forgotten Queens) epub

by Michael Hicks

eBook Anne Neville: Queen to Richard III (England's Forgotten Queens) epub
  • ISBN: 1435256689
  • Author: Michael Hicks
  • Genre: Biographies
  • Subcategory: Historical
  • Language: English
  • ePUB size: 1642 kb
  • FB2 size 1575 kb
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Anne Neville was queen to England's most notorious king, Richard Ii. Based largely upon primary sources, Michael Hicks’s fascinating book Anne Neville: Queen to Richard III (Tempus, 2007) charts the twists and turns of her eventful and ultimately tragic life.

Anne Neville was queen to England's most notorious king, Richard Iii. She was immortalised by Shakespeare for the remarkable nature of her marriage. This is a book which deserves a spot on the shelves of historians and non-historians alike.

Anne Neville (11 June 1456 – 16 March 1485) was an English queen, the younger of the two daughters and co-heiresses of Richard Neville, 16th Earl of Warwick (the "Kingmaker").

Anne Neville (11 June 1456 – 16 March 1485) was an English queen, the younger of the two daughters and co-heiresses of Richard Neville, 16th Earl of Warwick (the "Kingmaker")

Anne Neville was queen to England’s most notorious king, Richard III. She was immortalized by Shakespeare for the remarkable nature of her marriage, a union which brought together a sorrowing widow with her husband’s murderer. Anne’s misfortune did not end there

Anne Neville was queen to England’s most notorious king, Richard III. Anne’s misfortune did not end there. In addition to killing her first husband, this fascinating new biography also reveals how Richard also helped Anne Neville was queen to England’s most notorious king, Richard III. She was immortalised by Shakespeare for . Richard III - King from 1483 - Married Anne Neville and had one son. He declared his brother's children illegitimate and his marriage invalid and took the throne

Anne Neville was queen to England's most notorious king, Richard III. She was immortalised by Shakespeare for the remark. Richard 111 King Richard Anne Neville Elizabeth Of York Real Wife Father Father Book Lists I Love Books Books To Read. He declared his brother's children illegitimate and his marriage invalid and took the throne. He was killed in the Battle of Bosworth Field. Richard III Beyond reasonable doubt the individual exhumed at Grey Friars on September is indeed Richard III, the last Plantagenet king of England. Bombers found under a parking lot.

Michael Hicks, Anne Neville: Queen to Richard III. Commissioned. Patricia Dark, Matilda: England’s Warrior Queen. In memory of my parents . First published in 2007.

Электронная книга "Anne Neville: Queen to Richard III", Michael Hicks. Эту книгу можно прочитать в Google Play Книгах на компьютере, а также на устройствах Android и iOS. Выделяйте текст, добавляйте закладки и делайте заметки, скачав книгу. Выделяйте текст, добавляйте закладки и делайте заметки, скачав книгу "Anne Neville: Queen to Richard III" для чтения в офлайн-режиме. Dying before the age of thirty, she was always, apparently, the passive instrument of others' evil intentions. This biography seeks to tell the story of Anne's life, and uncovers the real wife of Richard III by charting the twists and turns of her fraught and tragic life. Michael Hicks is Professor of History at the University of Winchester. He has written extensively on medieval England and is regarded by many as the leading expert on the Yorkist dynasty. His books include the widely praised Richard III and Edward V both published by Tempus. He is also the author of Warwick the Kingmaker and Edward IV.

Anne Neville Queen of England. Original Female Character(s). In the light of the morning, Anne and Richard reflect on the night before, feelings they have held close to themselves for far too long and exactly what it is that they mean to each other. Featuring the sunrise through a bay window, two cups of tea and proof that actions can say more than words.

Anne Neville was the queen consort of Richard III, War of the Roses figure. Anne's father Richard Neville, Earl of Warwick, was called the Kingmaker for his shifting and influential roles in the Wars of the Roses. She married into the Lancaster and then the York branch of the royal family. He was a nephew of the Duke of York's wife, Cecily Neville, mother of Edward IV and Richard III. He came into considerable property and wealth when he married Anne Beauchamp. They had no sons, only two daughters, of whom Anne Neville was the younger, and Isabel (1451–1476) the elder.

Comments: (7)
Nicanagy
Like several reviewers of this book have already pointed out, for this book Mr Hicks uses the same strategy as in his Richard III to pick and choose and cut historical records at his convenience to pursue his own view of the last Plantagenet king as the archvillain of shakesperean tradition. As a woman, I regret this is made at the expense of his wife, whose very few records are only partially and twistedly reported to build up one more blackening mosaic of her husband.

In detail e.g. Hicks calls Richard of Gloucester "incestor" for marrying his cousin and childhood friend, but forgets to equally thus brand his brother George who had married Anne's sister. He says Richard would nowadays be called sex offender for marrying a 15 years old - Anne was 16 and already a widow by the time of their wedding, he was short of his 20s and had already sired 2 children outside wedlock in the 2 previous years when their families had fallen apart, it was 15th century, average life expentancy was about 40 years and Margaret Beaufort had been 12 when she had been married and gotten with child by 24 years old Edmund Tudor. What would Mr Hicks call him I wonder.

Hicks argues Anne's marriage with Richard was not legal on the ground of first degree consanguinity and has Richard knowingly and mischievously put a wayout clause in the 1474 Act of Parliament that settled the discussion over the Beauchamp's lands, making sure he could divorce and keep his wife's lands. He forgets to mention that this clause only applied in case they did not remarry and was meant to protect both Richard's and Anne's rights in case of divorce (that is, in case of the marriage being declared null) possibly because of George's objections at Anne's abduction to sanctuary on Richard's part (when it was probably a consensual elopment) rather than for problems of consanguinity as first cousins once removed he had with his own wife. According to canon law consent was essential for a marriage to be valid.

First degree consanguinity applied in the case of Henry VIII and his brother's widow Catherine of Aragorn. In their case the papal dispensation was obtained after Catherine declared the first marriage had not been consummated. When HVIII sought divorce 20 years later, he did so by disputing her claim (it was no longer possible to verify if Catherine had been virgin at the time of their wedding in any case) and insisting on the existence of a first degree consanguinity (caused by the carnal union between Catherine and his dead brother Arthur that made them one flesh and as a consequence both siblings to Henry) that made the marriage illegal.

In our case, there would have been first degree consanguinity if Richard had sought to marry Isabel (in case of widowhood) after she had married his brother George, but no such consanguinity applied for Anne and Richard. A similar papal dispensation was needed as for Isabel and George for consanguinity in the third and fourth degree and it was obtained according to records in the Vatican archives. In any case their marriage was never declared null, and it was public to everyone including secular and canon lawyers for 13 years, if any objections were raised, they were found void and rejected, so why cast shadows of doubt 500 years later when the parties that were directly involved apparently had none?

In the end, Hicks also digs up the old slanderous rumours of Richard coveting his niece Elizabeth and wishing to marry her in the hope for a more fertile consort after the death of his and Anne's only son. Hicks thus disgregards both the king's personal public refutal of these rumours (probably the worst humiliation in his life) AND above all the documents found in the Portoguese archives by the early 1980s proving he had sent ambassadors on a formal errand a few days after Anne's death to negotiate the double marriage between Richard and the Portoguese king's sister Joana and between the king's cousin Duke Manuel and Elizabeth of York.

I do not object at anyone holding their opinion, the more lavishly documented and argumented the better. However, I do object at manipulating records to pursue deliberate distortion of truth, especially when it is made under the cover of academic work from someone who likes to call himself historian.

Personally I deeply regret the money I wasted on this book, but you may choose to borrow it and read it and judge for yourselves. Just make sure not to stop at this book and read some other books on both Richard and Anne so that you get a more complete and unbiased picture of their lives and times
Sudert
Since there is virtually no written records of the everyday machinery of this queen, this book is almost entirely speculative and it's conclusions are drawn from records of other queens of the period. I understand that, but since I have read a fair amount of books on this period and am familiar with the generalities of her times, I was disappointed. I wanted to learn specifics about A.N. and this book didn't have any to offer.
Thordira
Anne Neville is one of the most poorly documented queens of England; Hicks originally doubted that he could find enough material. I applaud his effort, but 4 stars is somewhat generous: I award it for the uniqueness of the work and the lovely cover. This book should be of interest to the people interested in the Richard III controversies. The history and politics that determined the course of Anne's life are not well explained; anyone unfamiliar with the Wars of the Roses may want to read up on them first. Since the people mentioned here were the main actors, a few encyclopedia articles would probably be enough for a start. [Added 8/4/2016: in 2013, Amy Licence wrote a biography, Anne Neville: Richard III's Tragic Queen, which makes this one unnecessary, unless the reader wants to examine all sources.]

The book begins slowly with a chapter on Anne and Richard as fictionalized by the unavoidable William Shakespeare. Is there a law in the UK that the Wars of the Roses can't be discussed without extensive reference to the Bard? Hicks next tells us about Anne's noble ancestry; the reader should consult the genealogy at the end of the text to keep all the Richards, Annes, Isabels and Cecilys straight. Hicks might at least have included the stories about her semi-mythic ancestors: Guy of Warwick and The Swan Knight since he mentions the names and certainly has the space. After this, Hicks launches into Anne's life history and the book is fairly good until after Anne is widowed.

The rest of the book is chiefly concerned with the (dubious) dealings of her second husband, Richard, Duke of Gloucester; Anne is scanted. One would think that the death of her sister Isabel would be an event in Anne's life, let alone the attendant drama of illegal executions leading to a confrontation with Edward IV and Clarence's death, but it is mentioned almost parenthetically in a discussion of inheritance. Certainly there is room for more information: the book is only 215 pages, much of it is redundant: on p.71 Hicks tells about the consanguity between Clarence and Isabel. On pp.132-133, he gives us similar information about Richard and Anne, much of it the same. Since Clarence and Richard were brothers and Anne and Isabel were sisters, the reader probably knows a lot of this from p.71; the problem with their being cousins is obviously the same, only the issue of now being additionally related by marriage is added. Then on pp.143-144 he recounts it all again and recaps it on p.205.

I belong to the Richard III Society; that does not require me to think of him as a saint (I checked before I joined), but a lot of this is silly. Hicks seems torn between trying to be fair and trying to find almost any excuse to scald Richard. This accounts for a certain amount of the redundancy: issues may be visited twice, once with a neutral interpretation, than again with an anti-Richard interpretation. At least he does include the neutral interpretations.

He claims that their marriage was scandalous to their contemporaries, without quoting any who were scandalized. Related multiple times, Anne and Richard required dispensations to marry. Hicks argues that this may have been impossible, then mentions cases where such permission was granted. Proper documentation has not been found, but the marriage was accepted by their contemporaries. Hicks cites the property settlement as proof of a lack of proper dispensation, since it provides for the event of the marriage being annulled. As I recall, so did the marriage agreement for Richard's nephew, the Duke of York - this was outrageously unfair to the bride, but was this a standard provision for princes? There is also what I call the Obvious Problem: if the settlement makes it obvious that there was no dispensation, why didn't their contemporaries realize this? It was an Act of Parliament: how secret can it have been? I am much more cynical about dispensations: I think they involved more money & politics and less theology than Hicks seems to.

There is no evidence that Richard and Anne married chiefly for love, but as Hicks mentions, that was typical for their time and it made sense for them to join forces. Anne had a vast inheritance which she couldn't access, Richard was possibly the only man with the influence to get it. I do not see why Richard shouldn't have fought for Anne's share, nor do I see how this necessarily "exploited" her; Hicks finds it unseemly. Anne probably wanted her share for herself (to the extent that married women had any control), and her heirs as much as Richard did.

He makes provocative statements such as: "One must moreover deplore the immorality of the match. A custodial sentence and registration would result today for any man like Duke Richard [then 19] guilty of having sexual intercourse with a fifteen-year-old girl, but fifteenth century standards permitted such relations and indeed regarded them as normal and legitimate." [p.130] That's certainly having it both ways! Hicks has already told us, without any evidence of disapproval, that Margaret Beaufort was married at 12 [her husband was about 25] and a mother at 14. Anne was a already a widow before she married Richard: at 14 she had a consummated marriage with 17-year-old Edward of Lancaster. It certainly wasn't necessary to tell us again that early marriage was common; Hicks apparently just wanted to associate Richard, and only Richard, with sex offenses.

On the other hand, while discussing the possibility that Richard poisoned Anne, which Hicks certainly should, he surprised me by concluding that she probably wasn't.

Given the lack of personal detail for Anne's life, I think that it would have been better if Hicks had spent more time describing the usual life of a woman of her status, details of pageants that she may have attended, etc. One of the pleasures of reading biographies of ill-documented people is that the authors, not having to cram in a large amount of material, often create a better picture of the age than they do with major figures.
GODMAX
Anne Neville (1456-1485) packed into her short life a sufficient number of events for an adventurous career. Yet she has been described as the ‘most obscure’ of English queens and Shakespeare portrayed her as a victim. Based largely upon primary sources, Michael Hicks’s fascinating book Anne Neville: Queen to Richard III (Tempus, 2007) charts the twists and turns of her eventful and ultimately tragic life. This is a book which deserves a spot on the shelves of historians and non-historians alike.
Urtte
Anne Neville is an enigma, so I was interested in reading more about her. It definitely IS a good book about HER. I enjoyed reading it. However, if you're not interested in her - i.e., if you just want a biography to read - you might be disappointed.
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