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eBook Strange Haven: A JEWISH CHILDHOOD IN WARTIME SHANGHAI epub

by Sigmund Tobias

eBook Strange Haven: A JEWISH CHILDHOOD IN WARTIME SHANGHAI epub
  • ISBN: 0252024532
  • Author: Sigmund Tobias
  • Genre: Biographies
  • Subcategory: Leaders & Notable People
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: University of Illinois Press; First Edition (US) First Printing edition (April 1, 1999)
  • Pages: 208 pages
  • ePUB size: 1464 kb
  • FB2 size 1868 kb
  • Formats rtf mobi mbr lrf


Book Description I had no idea that Shanghai became a haven for Jewish people during the war. I cannot imagine how people lived in Shanghai with so many.

I had no idea that Shanghai became a haven for Jewish people during the war. I cannot imagine how people lived in Shanghai with so many hardships but I realize it was better than dying during the Holocaust.

In this exotic sanctuary, Sigmund Tobias grew from a six-year-old child to an adolescent. Tobias's coming-of-age story unfolds within his descriptions of Jewish life in Shanghai. Depleted by disease and hunger, constantly struggling with primitive and crowded conditions, the refugees faced shortages of food, clothing, and medicine

Apr 16, 2009 Carmen rated it really liked it.

In the wake of Kristallnacht, November 9, 1938, Sigmund Tobias and his parents left their home in Berlin and made plans to flee a Germany that was becoming increasingly dangerous for them. Like many European Jews, they faced the impossibility of obtaining visas to enter any other country in Europe or almost anywhere else in the world. Apr 16, 2009 Carmen rated it really liked it. Shelves: world-history.

Sigmund Tobias, author of the memoir Strange Haven, remembers his childhood days in Germany where he. .Tobias was six. Tobias’ well-written memoir describes their new world in China. People ate with chopsticks, and there was one toilet for seven families in their shelter.

Sigmund Tobias, author of the memoir Strange Haven, remembers his childhood days in Germany where he was cursed, spit upon, and pelted with garbage and rocks. He remembers Kristallnacht and the trauma of seeing the charred and burned handles of the sacred Torah scroll. He describes his schooling at the Kadoorie School and the Mir Yeshiva, and how his faith was shaken by the yeshiva’s greed and self-interest. I cannot imagine how people lived . Published by Thriftbooks. com User, 18 years ago. It just shows you how much you can endure when you absolutely have to do so. This book is very informative in dealing with how the Chinese people contributed to the survival of so many Jewish people.

Find many great new & used options and get the best deals for Strange Haven: A Jewish Childhood in Wartime .

Seventeen thousand Jewish refugees flocked to Hongkew, a section of Shanghai ruled by the Japanese, and they created an active community that continued to exist through the end of the war.

Tobias was born in Berlin, Germany, of Polish parents

Tobias was born in Berlin, Germany, of Polish parents. After the pogrom of November 10, 1938, his father unsuccessfully tried to escape to Belgium and was taken to Dachau concentration camp. Shanghai, at that time, was partially occupied by Japan and comprised an "International Settlement" and a "French Concession" under the jurisdiction of the Shanghai Municipal Council. The author writes that the book was stimulated by his return to China as a visiting professor in 1988, and he compares Shanghai with the city of his memories 40 years before.

Shanghai is a funny place. It can mean one thing for one person, and something entirely different for another – which may explain why so many people have written and published books about their personal experiences here. Shanghai’s varied, and at times traumatic past has shaped countless generations, and there are many books out there that testify to that.

However, Tobias work is a memoir of his personal experience and merely describes the Jewish situation in Shanghai, rather than analyze it. Marcia Reynders Ristainos Port of Last Resort: The Diaspora Communities of Shanghai stands in contrast to most other literature regarding Shanghais Jewish community, as Ristaino focuses much more on the politics of the refugees situation.

The author describes how he and his parents fled their home in Germany after Kristallnacht in 1938 and relocated to Shanghai, China.
Comments: (7)
Conjukus
First-hand account with a unique point of view, by a thoughtful writer.
Delagamand
This is an interesting personal story about a boy who lived in Shanghai while pursuing a religious education in a Yeshiva that was built there. The book provides a very good overview of the conditions, both political and physical under which the author and his parents lived. A very good introduction to this fascinating part of Jewish survival during WWII.
Naa
Very well done. Fantastic look into a relatively unknown aspect of history.
in waiting
A wonderful narrative and photographs of a journey from 1938 (Kristallnacht) Germany to Japanese occupied Shanghai and then to the United States after the surrender of Japan but before the liberation of Shanghai from Chiang Kai-shek by Mao. Tobias describes the day to day struggle to live and survive in a foreign land, waiting for the conclusion of World War II. Throughout this journey Tobias continually lives with the memories of his dead family members who were unable to flee Nazi Europe. At the end of the book Tobias takes us back to Shanghai to revisit his memories.

There are many surprises for anyone who doesn't know the details of Hitler's Germany. Prior to 1940, Jews sent to concentration camps were released if they could prove that they would leave Germany. Jews did not need passports or visas to enter Japanese controlled China. The Japanese respected Jewish history and had difficulty accepting the Nazi propaganda. Chiune Sugihara, the Japanese consul-general in Kovno, Lithuania, who made possible the escape of many Polish Jews to Shanghai, returned to Japan to live the post war years in dishonor for defying orders.

At its core this well written book describes the coming of maturity of a sensitive Jewish boy and his unique education in Jewish schools and the Mirer Yeshiva in Shanghai. Tobias avoids cliché and appears to deliver an accurate description of a unique personal story of World War II and its aftermath.
Sirara
I first heard about this book when the author and I appeared on the same radio program to discuss our books about Shanghai. (My book is "Shanghai: The Rise and Fall of a Decadent City, 1842-1949.") In the course of my research I read nearly all of the memoirs published by members of Shanghai's refugee Jewish community. All have their virtues, but Tobias' is one of the more thoughtful and reflective. It also has a novelistic flavor, especially the beginning when he recounts-sadly and movingly-his family's departure from Germany. The story he tells us is indeed strange, on so many levels, yet there is an all-pervading sense of the events the author describes as being all too urgent and real. "Strange Haven" captures Shanghai's details, its look, sounds and, above all, smells, wonderfully well. He goes into great detail, as well, about the experiences of the Jewish refugees in Hongkew, the area the Japanese turned into their version of a Jewish ghetto. Above all, "Strange Haven" is a story of survival in an extraordinary time and place.
Malarad
As some one who lived as a youngster in the wartime Shanghai Jewish Ghetto during the same time as the author, the book provides a very poignant, detailed and accurate description of what it was like, for impoverished European Jews to cope under the Japanese occupation, while living with equally poor Chinese families in over crowded slum like quarters. The author alluded numerous times to the horn-of-plenty the small orthodox community seemed to enjoyed and of which he personally benefited as well, while every one else had barely enough to prevent starvation. How the Yeshiva could have smuggled in enough US currency, (inviting a death penalty if caught by the Japanese) and distribute $30 US dollars a month, ( fortune at that time) to each family has always been a mystery to me. The hypocracy of a Jewish religious community stuffing themselves with fresh kosher meat, milk, butter and vegetable while the rest of us suffered from malnutrition, needs some further explaining. It has left a permanent bad taste in my mouth. Aside from this, Tobias has written a well balanced and touching account of his own personal, his family's and that of 18,000 other Jewish refugees' struggle to survive in the war time ghetto of Shanghai under Japanese bayonettes. We who lived through it will always have a feeling of gratitude to the equally suffering Chinese people. Claude Spingarn, [email protected]
DART-SKRIMER
I had no idea that Shanghai became a haven for Jewish people during the war. I cannot imagine how people lived in Shanghai with so many hardships but I realize it was better than dying during the Holocaust. It just shows you how much you can endure when you absolutely have to do so. This book is very informative in dealing with how the Chinese people contributed to the survival of so many Jewish people.
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