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eBook The Avenger Takes His Place: Andrew Johnson and the 45 Days That Changed the Nation epub

by Howard Means

eBook The Avenger Takes His Place: Andrew Johnson and the 45 Days That Changed the Nation epub
  • ISBN: 0151012121
  • Author: Howard Means
  • Genre: Biographies
  • Subcategory: Leaders & Notable People
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: Harcourt; First edition (November 1, 2006)
  • Pages: 304 pages
  • ePUB size: 1400 kb
  • FB2 size 1733 kb
  • Formats mobi azw lit lrf


Start by marking The Avenger Takes His Place: Andrew Johnson . will read about Johnson and a 45 day period in or around his inauguration. I kept looking for this, and "avenging".

Start by marking The Avenger Takes His Place: Andrew Johnson and the 45 Days That Changed the Nation as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read. But as a first book on Andrew Johnson, or as a comprehensive biography of a failed president, it is far from ideal. It was there, but only partly and scattered.

The trouble, however, is that it says virtually nothing that hasn't been written about elsewhere, is severely limited in its documentation, and (bizarrely) doesn't really begin to focus on the 45 days until midway through. One person found this helpful.

The Avenger Takes His Place: Andrew Johnson and the 45 Days That Changed the Nation (New York, 2006).

Fine in Fine DJ. ISBN: 0151012121 (Johnson, Andrew, Presidents, Politics, Government). Other Products from hartmannbooks (View All). Watson's Restaurant, Ocean Ave. at Ninth S. Ocean City, .

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The Avenger Takes His Place Close. 1 2 3 4 5. Want to Read. Are you sure you want to remove The Avenger Takes His Place from your list? The Avenger Takes His Place. Andrew Johnson and the 45 Days That Changed the Nation. Published November 1, 2006 by Harcourt. Prefer the physical book? Check nearby libraries with: WorldCat.

Personal Name: Johnson, Andrew, 1808-1875. On this site it is impossible to download the book, read the book online or get the contents of a book. Geographic Name: United States Politics and government 1865-1869. The administration of the site is not responsible for the content of the site. The data of catalog based on open source database. All rights are reserved by their owners. Download book The avenger takes his place : Andrew Johnson and the 45 days that changed the nation, Howard Means.

Bibliographic Details. Title: The Avenger Takes His Place: Andrew Johnson. Publisher: Houghton Mifflin Harcourt. Publication Date: 2006. Standard shipping can on occasion take up to 30 days for delivery. List this Seller's Books. Payment Methods accepted by seller.

Find nearly any book by Howard Means. Get the best deal by comparing prices from over 100,000 booksellers

Find nearly any book by Howard Means. Get the best deal by comparing prices from over 100,000 booksellers. The Banana Sculptor, the Purple Lady, and the All-Night Swimmer: Hobbies, Collecting, and Other Passionate Pursuits. by Susan Sheehan, Howard Means. ISBN 9781416575207 (978-1-4165-7520-7) Softcover, Simon & Schuster, 2007.

From the moment of Lincoln’s death on April 15, 1865, until Andrew Johnson, his replacement, formally announced postwar plans on May 29, the fate of the country hung in the balance. War had left the Republic strained almost beyond endurance. Johnson’s ascendancy to the presi­dency seemed the killing stroke even to the victorious North. A former slave owner from the border state of Tennessee, Johnson had been drunk at his inauguration as vice presi­dent; he was hated equally by the South and the North. Some Northerners were even convinced he had been part of the conspiracy behind Lincoln’s assassination. Later, he escaped impeachment by a single vote.
Comments: (7)
Marilore
I fully agree with Kevin Derby's excellent review above. The book is flawed. It meanders, and the title is misleading, but given the available choices, I would buy it again. I think it goes a long way toward capturing Johnson's character.
Andrew Johnson was a charismatic man, and when he entered a room, he dominated it, not always to his own advantage. He was intelligent, hard-working, courageous, stubborn to a fault, bigoted, and he nursed grudges.
Lincoln is bracketed by two Presidencies that are usually rated low, Buchanan's and Johnson's. Buchanan is blamed for not averting the war, and Johnson is blamed for botching the Reconstruction. Given the way things were, it is hard to see how it could have been otherwise.
Warts and all, there is much to admire in Johnson, and the same goes for this book.
Questanthr
From the title, I expected a detailed history of the days following his assumption of the presidency. While the tiles mislead me, I found a very readable, balanced enjoyable account of Johnson and Reconstruction. The book is a mini-biography of Andrew Johnson with emphases on the years prior to and during the Civil War, hunt for and trial of Lincoln's killers, the end of the Confederacy and the start of Presidential Reconstruction. This is a huge list of "hot topics" for an author to present in one book. Howard Means succeeds without falling into the Lost Cause Myth or current Politically Correct thinking, constructing a balanced readable and instructive book.

This is an introductory to mid-level history of the beginnings of Reconstruction. Starting with the application of Lincoln's "let `em up easy" and 10% rule to the rise of the Radical Republicans determined to make the South suffer and keep control of Congress. Both efforts, at reconstruction, are doomed from the start and could only increase problems for the nation and the new Freemen. A major strength of the book is the author's refusal to place either group on the side of good. He admits that each had base motives and sought power from reconstruction.

Walking through the turbulence is Andrew Johnson. The "flaws" that helped him in the Senate and as military governor, destroyed him as President. Honest, hard working and unable to comprise what he saw as "right" brought impeachment from men who felt he was wrong. From a respected hero of the Union, he became a hated symbol of the old South.

While not what I expected, this is an enjoyable an instructive read. The book is an excellent introduction to Reconstruction, the issues and people.
Jothris
Shortly after Lincoln's murder, while the entire country reeled from rumors that Lincoln's death was the result of a huge conspiracy that involved Confederate leaders, Herman Melville published "The Martyr," an ominous warning to all those who might've been involved. The "Forgiver"--Lincoln--has been murdered. "But the People in their weeping/ Bare the iron hand/Beware the People weeping/When they bare the iron hand." Why? Because "The Avenger [now] takes [Lincoln's] place."

Andrew Jackson was that terrible Avenger--or so the radical Republicans who wanted the South punished even before Lincoln's assassination hoped. There was good cause to think that Johnson was the man to crush the South. Few politicians had been as vocal about the need to punish treason with a hangman's noose than Andy Johnson, Tennessee's military governor. Moreover, the Republicans believed they could control Johnson in a way that Lincoln always successfully resisted: after all, Johnson was a backwoods lout who'd actually been drunk at his own inauguration! So the consensus was that the Avenger was in place: a President who on his own wanted to punish the South, and who could be manipulated by bloodier-minded, vengeance-seeking northern Republicans.

As author Howard Means points out, however, things didn't quite work out as planned. Johnson proved much more independent than Washington powerbrokers anticipated, and his hang-'em-high attitude toward the South proved to be more rhetorical than real. In fact, his plan for reconstruction pretty closely mirrored the 1863 suggestions Lincoln had left: a 10% solution (readmittance to the Union upon the election of new state governments voted in by at least 10% of eligible voters), and constitutionally guaranteed freedom for blacks. Johnson's stubborn refusal to endorse radical Republican plans to enfranchise blacks led to congressional resistance and then impeachment. After the first 45 days of his presidency, Johnson was increasingly powerless. It would take several administrations for the presidency to recover.

Means' account of the "45 days that changed the nation," as his book's subtitle has it, is well-written. The trouble, however, is that it says virtually nothing that hasn't been written about elsewhere, is severely limited in its documentation, and (bizarrely) doesn't really begin to focus on the 45 days until midway through. It's almost as if there are the beginnings of three books crammed between two covers: a bio of Johnson, an account of the national chaos and confusion following Lincoln's murder (Means shines here, and is to be commended), and (finally!) the conflict between Johnson and the Republican congress over Reconstruction. When it comes to this final point, Means' argument ultimately is that Lincoln probably could've pulled off what Johnson attempted. "It wasn't policy that would bring [Johnson] down so much as it was lack of political skills" (p. 212).* Perhaps. But it takes a lot more arguing than Means supplies to give this conjecture weight.

All in all, then, an interesting but not terribly essential book.
________
* To his credit, Means goes on to provide three other reasons besides lack of diplomacy for why Johnson's moderate Lincoln-inspired plan for Reconstruction failed (pp. 206-225)
Ttexav
Howard Means, the author, is excited about the life of Andrew Johnson, even though Johnson was a racist, an inelegant statesman and the first in a long line of forgettable presidents, and he got me excited too.
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