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eBook Inside the Oval Office: The White House Tapes from FDR to Clinton epub

by William Doyle

eBook Inside the Oval Office: The White House Tapes from FDR to Clinton epub
  • ISBN: 1568363168
  • Author: William Doyle
  • Genre: Biographies
  • Subcategory: Leaders & Notable People
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: Kodansha USA (March 22, 2002)
  • Pages: 365 pages
  • ePUB size: 1815 kb
  • FB2 size 1308 kb
  • Formats lit lrf mobi docx


Doyle, William, 1957-.

Doyle, William, 1957-. Books for People with Print Disabilities. Internet Archive Books. Delaware County District Library (Ohio).

Inside the Oval Office book. Based on his award-winning television special, "The Secret White House Tapes, " Doyle further explores how history has been shaped by the executive strengths and weaknesses of 11 .

Management styles from FDR to Clinton. Published by Thriftbooks. com User, 18 years ago. Doyle's unorthodox book is a survey of the differing management styles of eleven presidents, FDR through Clinton. The book purports to be based on secret presidential tapes. But actual tape transcripts comprise a tiny percentage of the pages of this book, and in any event, there were no surreptitious recordings of conversations after Nixon.

William Doyle unearthed scores of White House tapes and transcripts, many never before published.

He interviewed over one hundred Oval Office insiders, Cabinet members, and White House aides, from FDR’s personal secretary to Henry Kissinger, to present this riveting flesh-and-blood drama of the presidency in action. We're committed to providing low prices every day, on everything.

Contact Inside the Oval Office: the White House Tapes by William Doyle on Messenger. See actions taken by the people who manage and post content. Page created - May 9, 2011. PagesMediaBooks & MagazinesBookInside the Oval Office: the White House Tapes by William Doyle. English (US) · Suomi · Svenska · Español · Português (Brasil). Information about Page Insights Data.

Doyle combines transcripts of taped Oval Office conversations-from FDR to Bill Clinton-with his . William Doyle is a New York Times bestselling author and winner of the 1998 Writers Guild Award for Best Documentary for the A&E special, The Secret White House Tapes.

Doyle combines transcripts of taped Oval Office conversations-from FDR to Bill Clinton-with his assessment of each president's executive abilities. During the Cuban Missile Crisis, for example, John F. Kennedy showed what Doyle calls a pragmatic leadership style: "self-control, a call for multiple opinions, the discipline to think several steps ahead, and the ability to put himself in 'the other guy's shoes. He was also coproducer of the PBS special Navy SEALs: Their Untold Story. He lives in New York City.

William Doyle’s previous book, Inside the Oval Office: The White House Tapes from FDR to Clinton (1999), was a New York Times Notable Book

William Doyle’s previous book, Inside the Oval Office: The White House Tapes from FDR to Clinton (1999), was a New York Times Notable Book. In 1998 he won the Writers Guild of America Award for Best TV Documentary for the A&E special The Secret White House Tapes, which he co-wrote and co-produced.

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He talked about interviewing President Obama for The Finish, a book he was writing about the killing of Osama bin Laden

The FDR recordings reveal an intimate inside view of his patrician, gossipy, and supremely confident executive style, as he uses charm, vagueness, gossip, and occasional deviousness as tools for managing his presidency," author William Doyle wrote in his 1999 book, Inside the Oval Office: The White House Tapes from FDR to Clinton. He talked about interviewing President Obama for The Finish, a book he was writing about the killing of Osama bin Laden.

Find nearly any book by WILLIAM DOYLE. Get the best deal by comparing prices from over 100,000 booksellers. Inside the Oval Office: The White House Tapes from FDR to Clinton: ISBN 9781568363165 (978-1-56836-316-5) Softcover, Kodansha USA, 2002. Japanese Women Don't Get Old or Fat: Secrets of My Mother's Tokyo Kitchen. ISBN 9780385339971 (978-0-385-33997-1) Hardcover, Delacorte Press, 2005.

Traces taping history
Comments: (7)
showtime
It's a little mindblowing to realize such a historical resource exists: Recordings of presidents in the Oval Office discussing matters of state, negotiating with world leaders, and offering often-candidly caustic opinions of their contemporaries.

While William Doyle's "Inside The Oval Office" is subtitled "The White House Tapes From FDR To Clinton," this is a misnomer. As others here point out, there's really only a trio of presidents that taped themselves at work with any regularity, Kennedy, Johnson, and Nixon, and four more (Roosevelt, Truman, Eisenhower, and Ford) that did so even at all. Reagan and Clinton both had video crews film some of their formal meetings, but Bush 41 and Carter avoided anything more involved than private diary tapings in recording the doings of their administrations.

Despite the uneven nature of this record, Doyle tries his best to analyze each president's administration from a purely executive-managerial level, sometimes using the tapes as a guide but just as often relying on contemporaneous accounts and even interviews with people who were in the room with the various chief executives. The result is some fascinating portraits in miniature of the vastly different leadership styles America have elected to its helm.

Doyle manages effective profiles of each man, but delivers the goods best on the ones, not surprisingly, who did the most taping. LBJ verbally bludgeons cowering senators to pass aggressive civil rights legislation and tells a pants manufacturer to give him some slacks with more room for his testicles, employing some decidedly earthy terminology in both instances. Kennedy and his Best and Brightest advisor team listen in on reports from Ole Miss while James Meredith is enrolled as a student there and the campus erupts into a combat zone. Nixon makes bizarre and angry pronouncements, half-commands and half-rantings, urging aides to spy on Kissinger when he suspects his chief diplomat is talking to the press.

"Even with all their limitations, the Oval Office tapes do offer something no other source can: A real-time record of the presidents as executives in action as they manage the business of American history," Doyle writes.

I heard my first Oval Office tape a couple of months ago at whitehousetapes.org, the first one ever made which features FDR holding a press conference in August 1940 and then, after the room is cleared, slyly slipping an aide some dirt on his Republican opponent, Wendell Willkie, apparently having forgotten he was wired for sound. That whole tape, just under an hour, is fascinating listening, even during that sometimes dry press conference where Roosevelt talks about American military preparedness and then apologizes to the lone female reporter before using the term "BVD," a brand of men's underwear the troops were being outfitted with.

It would have been nice to read about filigree like that in this book, if it had been written as a tour guide of the mounds of tapes out there and all the strange secrets and bits of trivia they contain. You can't listen to all the tapes; Nixon alone made more than 3,000 hours of them. But something attempting to give shape to the vast treasure trove of Presidential tapings would have been more worthy of the title of this book.

Please don't read that as a knock: Doyle does write a solid historical overview, complete with voluminous footnotes that should please the scholar as well as the casual reader. He manages the feat of presenting a very political setting in a way that is non-partisan yet zesty. He offers some interesting tidbits about each president you won't find in any other book, particularly Johnson, who agonized about Vietnam long before most anyone else did and was in many ways the Oval Office's most complicated man.

"He was King Lear, Dr. Jekyll, Mr. Hyde, Captain Ahab, Moses, and Grendel, all stuffed into a scratching, belching, blustering, six-foot two-inch 220-plus pound explosive package," as Doyle memorably puts it, yet Johnson was also a passionate humanitarian and patriot who, as caught on tape, once exclaimed the one thing he ever wanted in the world was "a little love."

A good book, at times very very good, but one with a poorly-chosen subtitle.
Binthars
This book delves into the lives and work and legacy of U.S. Presidents from Franklin Delano Roosevelt through William Jefferson Clinton, with verbatim excerpts from each President's audio taping system. I purchased the audio book and enjoy listening to it in my commutes to work.
Ishnjurus
This one was an eye opener. From the lead sheets I thought it might be a scandal ridden gossip tome. It was anything but. There are few books that provide a very real and accurate window into history. This is one of them. Well written. Quick and easy to read. Contains snapshots of several Americans that you will not find elsewhere.
Lestony
Found this book very informative. Never knew what was going on in the Oval Office in those days. Would recommend this book to anyone who finds politics fascinating
Hi_Jacker
Doyle's unorthodox book is a survey of the differing management styles of eleven presidents, FDR through Clinton. The book purports to be based on secret presidential tapes. But actual tape transcripts comprise a tiny percentage of the pages of this book, and in any event, there were no surreptitious recordings of conversations after Nixon. Anyone buying this book to read juicy tape transcripts will be disappointed. Instead, this book is a description of how each of the eleven presidents structured his staff, coped with the workload, and made decisions.
Some presidents come across very differently than their popular image: For instance, Reagan was a surprisingly hands-on president, while Bush Sr. is portrayed as ineffectual and passive. Clinton fares very poorly in this book due to his lack of organization. It is Johnson, however, that is the most memorable, combining political acumen with incredibly disgusting personal habits. The book, as a whole, walks the reader through a half-century of US history as events were experienced in the Oval Office.
Nilarius
This is a terrific book and rewards the reader with insight into the modern presidency. It talks about each President's strengths and how each of them got themselves into trouble and it illustrates its points using each President's own words. Because it is less than 400 pages long it is hard for Doyle to support all the claims he makes, but it is still worth reading. More than that, it is worth owning and re-reading. The only reason I didn't give it five stars is that I think the book could have gone a bit deeper into each presidency without adding too much length. It was just a bit too much this side of a tourist's guide to each presidency.
But there are so many wonderful and new insights that I feel guilty for not giving it five stars. So, if you want, just imagine that I did give it the full five with this little caveat.
BeatHoWin
I learnt more about the inner workings of the Oval Office from reading this book than when I used to be at school. You decide whether that's a bad thing...
..."Inside The Oval Office" is aimed at using taped conversations (no, Nixon wasn't the only one to do this) that occured in the Oval Office. However, don't think that this book is just one long transcript - the conversations are merely part of each wonderful chapter, as the comments are analyzed, described and discussed by Doyle in great length.
The book is split into a section for each President from Roosevelt onwards to Clinton, using recorded conversations in the Oval Office as a backdrop for Doyle's excellent thoughts and revelations on the attitudes and actions of some of the last century's most famous leaders.
Well worth a read for those who want to learn more about what happens inside America's most famous office.
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