» » The Deserter's Tale: The Story of an Ordinary Soldier Who Walked Away from the War in Iraq

eBook The Deserter's Tale: The Story of an Ordinary Soldier Who Walked Away from the War in Iraq epub

by Joshua Key

eBook The Deserter's Tale: The Story of an Ordinary Soldier Who Walked Away from the War in Iraq epub
  • ISBN: 0802143458
  • Author: Joshua Key
  • Genre: Biographies
  • Subcategory: Leaders & Notable People
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: Grove Press (December 21, 2007)
  • Pages: 256 pages
  • ePUB size: 1489 kb
  • FB2 size 1580 kb
  • Formats azw doc lrf mobi


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soldier who actually served in Iraq to claim sanctuary from the Immigration and Refugee Board of Canada, based on his 'personal experience with atrocities' in Iraq. Combatant Key will be able to raise the question of the war's legality as a defense. The American Army is having a lot of trouble attracting new recruits, in part because of the war in Iraq-its horrors, the lies, and the sixteen hundred Gls who are dead.

Key, who scored 49 out of 99 on the Army's aptitude test, was told by his recruiter not to mention an existing .

Key, who scored 49 out of 99 on the Army's aptitude test, was told by his recruiter not to mention an existing medical condition, prior arrests and number of children. With his application thus fabricated, Key became a soldier. Although Key's story is in many ways typical of the war stories of soldiers in wars from World War I to Vietnam, his is also the unusual story of a young man willing to act according to his conscience, no matter the consequences. 10 people found this helpful.

The Deserter's Tale book. Joshua Key booked it to Canada after initially serving part of a tour of duty in Iraq. Mr Key does not pretend to be a nice guy: he readily admits to theft, assault, and all manner of juvenile idiocy. He is definitely not the type of fellow you want your daughter bringing home to meet the parents.

Joshua Key22 de janeiro de 2008

Joshua Key22 de janeiro de 2008. Detailing the grinding horrors of life as part of an occupying force, The Deserter’s Tale is the story of a conservative-minded family man and patriot who went to war believing unquestioningly in his government’s commitment to integrity and justice, and how what he saw in Iraq transformed him into someone who could no longer serve his country.

Now in paperback, The Deserter’s Tale is the first memoir from a soldier who deserted from the war in Iraq, and a vivid and damning indictment of the American military campaign. In spring 2003, young Oklahoman Joshua Key was sent to Ramadi as part of a combat engineer company. It was not the campaign against terrorists and evildoers he had expected. Key saw Iraqi civilians beaten, shot, and killed, or maimed for little or no provocation. After seven months in Iraq, Key was home on leave and knew he could not return.

In the first-ever memoir from a young soldier who deserted from the war in Iraq, Joshua Key offers a vivid and damning indictment of what America is doing there and how the war itself is being waged. 14 people like this topic

In the first-ever memoir from a young soldier who deserted from the war in Iraq, Joshua Key offers a vivid and damning indictment of what America is doing there and how the war itself is being waged. 14 people like this topic.

Joshua Key breaks from that habit with this important and disturbing book. Key was featured in a cover story in the Denver Post (April 15, 2007) about the growing number of soldiers going AWOL.

book by Lawrence Hill. Destined to become part of the literature of the Iraq war. Joshua Key breaks from that habit with this important and disturbing book. They are giving up their steady paychecks, the benefits and other enticements, to turn their backs on America's aggression and war profiteering. After being involved with or witnessing endless violence, Key had had enough.

Praise for The Deserter’s Tale The Deserter’s Tale by Joshua Key is destined to become part of the literature of. .The Story of an Ordinary Soldier Who Walked Away from the War in Iraq. Joshua Key. as told to.

Praise for The Deserter’s Tale The Deserter’s Tale by Joshua Key is destined to become part of the literature of the Iraq War.

Although the book is well written, it is actually hard to read, because of the .

Key, Joshua, and Lawrence Hill. The Deserter's Tale: The Story of an Ordinary Soldier Who Walked Away from the War in Iraq. Although the book is well written, it is actually hard to read, because of the . Army's allegations of Key's disloyalty, dishonesty, disrespect, selfishness, dishonor, lack of integrity, and cowardice, particularly during his first deployment with the 3rd Armored Cavalry Regiment to Iraq.

 “Destined to become part of the literature of the Iraq war . . . A substantial contribution to history.”—Los Angeles TimesNow in paperback, The Deserter’s Tale is the first memoir from a soldier who deserted from the war in Iraq, and a vivid and damning indictment of the American military campaign. In spring 2003, young Oklahoman Joshua Key was sent to Ramadi as part of a combat engineer company. It was not the campaign against terrorists and evildoers he had expected. Key saw Iraqi civilians beaten, shot, and killed, or maimed for little or no provocation. After seven months in Iraq, Key was home on leave and knew he could not return. So he took his family and went underground in the United States, finally seeking asylum in Canada after fourteen months in hiding. Detailing the grinding horrors of life as part of an occupying force, The Deserter’s Tale is the story of a conservative-minded family man and patriot who went to war believing unquestioningly in his government’s commitment to integrity and justice, and how what he saw in Iraq transformed him into someone who could no longer serve his country.
Comments: (7)
Itiannta
Joshua Key appeared on Diane Rehm's NPR show today with fill in host Katty Kay, a BBC "journalist" sympathetic to Key's self imposed situation. Listening to the soporific Key attempt to describe his misadventures in Iraq, one is amazed at how Lawrence Hill, the actual writer of Key's book, managed to extract any coherent thoughts from Key to get down on paper.

The type of support for Key on the radio program was exemplified by one emailer who proclaimed he loathed all the American troops in Iraq. One caller, a veteran of the Iraq campaign, managed to slip through the NPR anti Conservative submarine nets. While he admitted he did not think the war in Iraq was a prudent decision, he did reveal Key as a pusillanimous poltroon.

When a caller asked Key why he didn't claim conscientious objector status, Key responded that he was not aware of such an option. Apparently, Key was ot aware that had he just refused to take orders in Iraq, the military would have reassigned him, or the MP's would have taken him into custody, which would have resulted in a dishonorable discharge with zero benefits. In Key's troubled mind, desertion to Canada was the only option he allowed himself to contemplate.

Instead of the most likely penalty for his refusal to do his duty, the inevitable bad paper stigma in his 201 file, he keeps insisting he was afraid of any jail time, regardless of the duration. Key seems to be a frazzled and pathetic character long before the military took him in. His fears in civilian life only grew in the military. He went from being afraid of not having the income to support a family he apparently did not plan for, to the fear of being assigned to perform his service in combat situations, to participating in war crimes, or not participating in war crimes, to possible jail time for desertion, to seeking refuge in a foreign country to avoid taking responsibility for any of the consequences of his actions. Whenever this guy had to make a decision, he instinctively chooses the wrong course of action.

Key stated that he first attempted to enlist in the Marines, but they turned him down because his background check revealed him as a credit criminal. The U.S. Army went out on a limb to give this malcontent a chance and this poltroon's gratitude is represented first by deserting his post and then being duped by Canadian con artists to market a diatribe against the U.S., its armed forces and the American rule of law.

Audie Murphy wanted to get into the service for the same reasons as Key. Of course making comparisons of Audio Murphy's WWII exploits with Joshua Key's time in Iraq is insulting to the memory of Murphy, but Murph was also turned down by the Marines, the Navy, and the paratroops before the army infantry took him in. Funny how the motivations of two equally poor and uneducated civilians, who joined the military as a way to support their families, ended with polar opposite results.

Key seems as confused as John Kerry when it comes to what he actually did in the service of his country. As we all know, Kerry alternately described his actions in Vietnam as criminal and courageous. Key brags that he was adept at using C4 to blow the hinges off of doors to gain entry into homes. He enjoyed the adrenalin rush. The he admits he stole cash, jewelry and valuables from the homes of Iraqis. But he objected to soldiers playing soccer with the severed head of an insurgent. That was one activity he did not join in. Of course he also never reported any of these real or imagined war crimes to any of his superiors. Why? He claims he was sick the weeks the army explained to enlisted men the procedure should such a contingency occur.

Key and his family currently reside on Gabriola Island, B.C. It seems the Canadians want to isolate this critter until they figure out the proper recourse of action for this dopey pawn of the far left.
Alsalar
Much of the criticism of Joshua Key's book in the comments section here pertains to several technical errors in the text. Yet the important part of Key's book is his description of the atrocities committed by US troops. Ample documentation of such atrocities, and worse, can be viewed at the "soldiers against the war" archive at TheWe.cc.

Also watch the "Permission to Engage" (47 minutes) documentary for free online.

Thank you, Joshua Key, for telling the truth about US barbarism, and thank you for having the courage to say "No" to it and walk away from it. If most Americans had the conscience and the courage that you have, the USA wouldn't be the world's worst perpetrator of terrorism and the arch-enemy of freedom-loving people everywhere.
Grinin
I have not even gotten past page 52 and have found this book riddled with lies about Iraq and the Army. My husband is in the Army and has been for 7 years. He has been deployed twice to Iraq. The first time was 2003-2004 and again 2005-2006. Mr. Key and the publishers of this book are very good at telling stories. First off, Mr. Key mentions his basic training was 17 weeks long. Basic is nine weeks long for every soldier in the US Army. AIT can be of varied lengths depending on your MOS.

He states his Drill Sergeants begin cursing at him from the moment he arrived at Leonard Wood. Maybe they were yelling but I can assure you they were not cursing. They have not been allowed to curse at privates since at least 1998 and probably before that.

He states that he was woke up in the middle of the night to beat soldiers who were not up to par. That is not allowed under any circumstances and soldiers found doing that are subject to military punishment.

He talks about how he was trained to hate Iraqi's and Muslims. The Army goes out of their way to train soldiers on the Muslim way of life and how to respect its' customs. Army chaplains speak with soldiers prior to deployment about the subject and they go through various training classes to learn about the culture.

The Army has a very strict policy in regards to racism and equal opportunity and would not tolerate any soldier using the phrase "sand nigger" especially in a training unit.

As a military wife I am totally disgusted by this book and the way it portrays the military. I guess if I had not exprienced Army life and the Iraq war myself, I might belive his story. As one other person stated, soldiers express disbelief at what he is saying. Well, that is because it is false. During the period of time this person was in Iraq, yes they did have IED's, but they were very primitive and half the time did not work properly. My husband has exprienced IED and numerous other aspects of combat, but I assure everyone he drives down the road just fine without feeling that a cardboard box will blow us up.

If you want a good laugh then read this book. If you want a true portrayal and REAL soldiers view of life in the Army and being in Iraq, ask one.
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