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eBook Tide, Feather, Snow: A Life in Alaska epub

by Miranda Weiss

eBook Tide, Feather, Snow: A Life in Alaska epub
  • ISBN: 0061710261
  • Author: Miranda Weiss
  • Genre: Biographies
  • Subcategory: Memoirs
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: Harper Perennial; 1 edition (May 25, 2010)
  • Pages: 288 pages
  • ePUB size: 1820 kb
  • FB2 size 1206 kb
  • Formats lrf azw mbr lrf


Miranda Weiss's Tide, Feather, Snow is beautifully poetic, her observations are expansive. Last fall, my husband & I went for a whirlwind drive in Alaska. We overnighted in Homer, ate fresh caught halibut out on the spit & watched an amazing day & night pass over Katchemak Bay.

Miranda Weiss's Tide, Feather, Snow is beautifully poetic, her observations are expansive. So Miranda Weiss' memoir caught my fancy, & I was not disappointed. One of the best (& worst!) reasons to pack up & leave for places unknown is because the man you love wants to.

In Tide, Feather, Snow, Miranda Weiss, a young woman who grew up landlocked in well-kept East Coast suburbs, moves with her boyfriend to Homer, Alaska, where the days are quartered by the most extreme tides in the country, where the years are marked by seasons of fish, and where locals carry around the knowledge of fish, tides, boats, and weather as ballast. At first, she struggles to make a place for herself in this unfamiliar country. Weiss's keenly observed prose introduces readers to the memorable people and peculiar beauty of Alaska's vast landscape and takes us on her personal journey of adventure, physical challenge, and culture clash.

Miranda Weiss has offered a book in Tide, Feather, Snow: A Life in Alaska, that could be a bit of a stretch to place in that category but as I read the book I appreciated very much th Very Entertaining and Well Written Book. I love books about the North, whether Canada, Alaska or Europe and I'm always willing to take a chance on a new author who wants to tackle this area. I grew up on Jack London, Farley Mowat and Pierre Burton and anything that puts me in that reminiscent state of mind is welcome.

But once in Alaska, I felt adrift and confused. I was a stranger in a place where days were quartered by the tides, where the year was marked by seasons of fish

O madly the sea pushes upon the land, With love, with love. But once in Alaska, I felt adrift and confused. I was a stranger in a place where days were quartered by the tides, where the year was marked by seasons of fish. I was marooned by words I didn’t know: beam, bilge, pitch, draft. People spoke about the surface of the sea with common words made foreign: lumpy, messy, calm as glass.

Miranda Weiss's Tide, Feather, Snow is beautifully poetic, her observations are expansive, and the pace and rhythm in which she writes are perfect. Lynne Cox, author of Grayson and Swimming to Antarctica. Tide, Feather, Snow is about the resplendence and subtleties of coastal Alaska, and about one woman’s attempt to be fully present in them. Weiss serves as a skilled and poetic witness to a place undergoing incessant change. Anthony Doerr, author of The Shell Collector.

New York, NY : Collins. A tribute to the natural beauty of Alaska and the survival skills of its native residents describes how the author and her boyfriend relocated from an east-coast suburb to the extreme climates of Alaska's country, where harsh conditions forced them to acquire essential understandings about the weather, water, and fishing season.

Miranda Weiss's Tide, Feather, Snow is beautifully poetic, her observations are expansive, and the pace and . A memoir of moving to Alaska-and staying-by a writer whose gift for writing about place and natural beauty is reminiscent of John McPhee (Coming into the Country) and Jonathan Raban (Passage to Juneau).

In Tide, Feather, Snow, Weiss introduces readers to the memorable people and peculiar beauty of Alaska's vast landscape, as she takes us along on her remarkable personal journey of adventure, physical challenge, and culture clash. Похожие книги: Culture Clash: Islam's War on the West. LibRing - система поиска книг в интернет-магазинах.

Tide, Feather, Snow is a memoir of the author's years making a home in. .

Tide, Feather, Snow is a memoir of the author's years making a home in the community of Homer, Alaska. The book is a delightful mix of inspired awe at the majestic natural world, and a wry look at the personal foibles of the author and other community members. Within a single chapter, I was enthralled by the vivid details of a variety of wildlife, and chuckling at the "dose of reality" of a backyard junkyard created by a man who claims to be an environmentalist (after all, he reuses and recycles). In the late 1990s Miranda Weiss moved from the continental US to Homer, Alaska.

"Miranda Weiss's Tide, Feather, Snow is beautifully poetic, her observations are expansive, and the pace and rhythm in which she writes are perfect.” — Lynne Cox, author of Grayson and Swimming to Antarctica

"Tide, Feather, Snow is about the resplendence and subtleties of coastal Alaska, and about one woman’s attempt to be fully present in them. Weiss serves as a skilled and poetic witness to a place undergoing incessant change." — Anthony Doerr, author of The Shell Collector

A memoir of moving to Alaska—and staying—by a writer whose gift for writing about place and natural beauty is reminiscent of John McPhee (Coming into the Country) and Jonathan Raban (Passage to Juneau).

Comments: (7)
Zeks Horde
A suburban Bethesda MD girl goes to Alaska with an older boyfriend and settles near Homer. She ultimately tires of his teacherliness towards her, and fears the kayaking trips he favors most. Though they care about each other, her teaching job in town and the general scene don't appeal, so she returns to take a master's in writing at Columbia. But the pull of Alaska remains strong, and Weiss returns to Homer, from which she writes a blog I ran across in 2015 and enjoyed. She is now married to another man and has a couple of children. Writes knowingly of the outdoors and the peculiar,necessary adjustments people make who come to live in Alaska from the Lower 48.
Xor
A young woman tells of surviving where snow-covered mountains & big skies are mirrored in Katchemak Bay with its generous bounty & hidden terrors.

"Moving to coastal Alaska means moving to the water life, although I hadn't known it until I arrived. Nothing is separate from the sea -- not the sky, not the land, not a single day, nor my mood. I wasn't used to this. I wasn't ready for it." [p.1] Each chapter offers a name for something watery & what it defines.

Last fall, my husband & I went for a whirlwind drive in Alaska. We overnighted in Homer, ate fresh caught halibut out on the spit & watched an amazing day & night pass over Katchemak Bay. So Miranda Weiss' memoir caught my fancy, & I was not disappointed.

One of the best (& worst!) reasons to pack up & leave for places unknown is because the man you love wants to. Having written about Alaska for a school project, Miranda knows well that our 49th State is one of the few places you don't need a passport to go to to find sparsely populated areas & dwellings you can start from scratch. Add in some local history, temperature & daylight extremes, a breathtaking wilderness that mostly ignores your boundaries & will kill you if you let your guard down, & you have the ingredients for an engaging memoir.

She takes the inland ferry north from Seattle, stopping at settlements along the way, to finally offload at Homer where awaits John "... who was the convergence of the life I had left behind and the new one I would create. I felt a split second of disappointment. The end of anticipation is always a letdown; the beginning is already over." [p.38]

She goes on to sketch details their relationship, fragments from her past, the flora & fauna all around, lores & legends she picks up as she follows in his footsteps, even to making her own kayak & braving the waters of that fearsome bay.

As she shows us the world she came to, she tells the stories of how she earned her place there, even though the love between her & John meets a natural death which, as you read between the lines, you'll see why.

With little sentimentality & fleeting moments of poignancy, this is a satisfying meditation of someone's odyssey that sings of the beauty she saw, brings up thoughts about family, history & the environment, stumbles through personal darknesses, struts with accomplishment & muses about gaining contentment wherein you find yourself.
Itiannta
What first caught my attention about this book was its cover. The front cover photo is truly beautiful. Second, I was intrigued by the subject. For me Alaska has always been a far away and mysterious place, so I thought this could be an interesting approach to get to know more about the state. The book delivered what I expected from its title. Miranda Weiss takes the reader through a beautiful tour by different places of the state and describes colorfully its wide palette of habitants, their activities, likes, dislikes, and ways of life. The description she makes about the fauna of the place is also very interesting. She lives in Homer, and from there she goes places to explore the territory.

She does this while baring her own feelings and adjusts to all the landscapes of her new home. She writes about the experience of building her own kayak, fishing exploring, teaching, and even skinning an otter. She talks about the seasons in Alaska, how tough the winters are with such short hours of daylight. I did enjoy this book a lot. It's entertaining and interesting. If you are curious about what life can be like in such a remote place like Alaska, specially for a woman, this is a good book to start with.
Phalaken
Miranda Weiss gives such detail when writing about her time in Alaska that you feel like your sitting right there with her experiencing it. My husband and I are getting ready to move to Alaska so this book is great for an eye opening detail of what we may experience! definitely recommend this book to anyone wanting to experience Alaska.
Dori
Read before I went to Homer. I was able to answer a lot of questions my group had because of this book. Chock full of sciencey details! The pic is from my kayak in the bay (like the cover of the book.)
black coffe
Nice book about life in Alaska. Not inspiring, but documents a transitional time for the author.
Just_paw
Everyone dreams of the beautiful Alaska..picture perfect, great for that dreamed of cruise, nice getaway. This is not just the story of the outsiders quick glance, but of the year round inhabitants and how they survive. Real eye-opener. I loved how it was written. Highly recommend
This is a fantastic read! I bought it just before moving to Homer and have loved getting to see my new home through this wonderfully descriptive author's eyes. Highly recommended!
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