» » Carrying the Fire: An Astronaut's Journeys

eBook Carrying the Fire: An Astronaut's Journeys epub

by Charles A. Lindbergh,Michael Collins

eBook Carrying the Fire: An Astronaut's Journeys epub
  • ISBN: 0374119171
  • Author: Charles A. Lindbergh,Michael Collins
  • Genre: Biographies
  • Subcategory: Professionals & Academics
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: Farrar, Straus and Giroux; 1st edition (1974)
  • Pages: 478 pages
  • ePUB size: 1994 kb
  • FB2 size 1231 kb
  • Formats lit mobi azw doc


Carrying the Fire: An Astronaut's Journeys is the autobiography of the Gemini 10 and Apollo 11 astronaut Michael Collins. It was released in 1974 with a foreword by the aviator Charles Lindbergh.

Carrying the Fire: An Astronaut's Journeys is the autobiography of the Gemini 10 and Apollo 11 astronaut Michael Collins. The book was re-released in 2009 to coincide with the 40th anniversary of the first crewed lunar landing, and again for its 50th anniversary, in 2019.

Carrying the Fire" may be the best of the former astronaut books. Collins has the unique ability to put us there with him as an astronaut. I really enjoyed the time spent on the Gemini flights as I feel that program is not fully appreciated

Carrying the Fire" may be the best of the former astronaut books. Done without a ghostwriter, Collins covers his astronaut career in great detail. He's insightful and honest about his thoughts and feelings at the time, and is surprisingly funny as well. I really enjoyed the time spent on the Gemini flights as I feel that program is not fully appreciated. One of, if the not best astronaut stories.

Carrying the Fire book. Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read. Start by marking Carrying the Fire: An Astronaut's Journey as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read.

Carrying the Fire: An Astronaut's Journeys is an autobiographical book written by the Gemini 10 and Apollo 11 astronaut, Michael Collins. It was released in 1974 and has a foreword written by Charles Lindbergh

Carrying the Fire: An Astronaut's Journeys is an autobiographical book written by the Gemini 10 and Apollo 11 astronaut, Michael Collins. It was released in 1974 and has a foreword written by Charles Lindbergh. An updated version was re-released in 2009 to coincide with the 40th anniversary of the first manned lunar landing. The book covers his life as a test pilot in the United States Air Force, his selection as an astronaut and his spacewalks on Gemini 10 and historic flight as the Command Module pilot on Apollo 11.

NASA astronaut Michael Collins trained as an experimental test pilot before venturing into space as a vital member of the Gemini 10 and Apollo 11 missions

NASA astronaut Michael Collins trained as an experimental test pilot before venturing into space as a vital member of the Gemini 10 and Apollo 11 missions. NASA astronaut Michael Collins trained as an experimental test pilot before venturing into space as a vital member of the Gemini 10 and Apollo 11 missions.

In Carrying the Fire, Michael Collins conveys, in a very personal way, the drama, beauty, and humor of that adventure

In Carrying the Fire, Michael Collins conveys, in a very personal way, the drama, beauty, and humor of that adventure. He also traces his development from his first flight experiences in the air force, through his days as a test pilot, to his Apollo 11 space walk, presenting an evocative picture of the joys of flight as well as a new perspective on time, light, and movement from someone who has seen the fragile Earth from the other side of the moon.

Carrying the Fire: An Astronaut's Journeys . Carrying the Fire: An Astronaut's Journeys. Flag as Inappropriate

Carrying the Fire, book by Apollo 11 astronaut Michael Collins, which . An Astronaut's Journeys. By Michael Collins It is something new under the sun to find an astronaut who isn't afraid to express his feelings

Carrying the Fire, book by Apollo 11 astronaut Michael Collins, which relates his experiences as part of crew which made 1st manned landing on moon, revd; surface of moon and Apollo 11 spacecraft illus (M. Foreword by Charles A. Lindbergh. 478 pp. New York: Farrar, Straus & Giroux. It is something new under the sun to find an astronaut who isn't afraid to express his feelings. After an earlier flight, Gemini 10, Collins tried to paint what he had seen, but his spacecraft turned out all lumpy, and his clouds, instead of being ethereal, were anemic. Words serve him better.

Carrying the Fire: An Astronaut's Journey (Paperback). He is breezy, glib, collegiate, and frequently funny. There are marvelous things in Carrying the Fire that catch a reader unaware every few pages. Michael Collins (author), Charles Lindbergh (author). The New York Times Strikingly authentic. Written with vigor, humor, and unusual insight into men and machines, this is an outstanding book Added to basket.

Michael Collins, a NASA astronaut, was the third American to walk in space (Gemini 10) and the pilot of the command module during Apollo 11's mission to the moon in July, 1969. Following his career as an astronaut, he served as the director of the Smithsonian's National Air and Space Museum in Washington, DC. He has since retired and lives in Marco Island, Florida. Country of Publication.

The years that have passed since Neil Armstrong, Buzz Aldrin, and Michael Collins piloted the Apollo 11 spacecraft to the moon in July 1969 have done nothing to alter the fundamental wonder of the event: man reaching the moon remains one of the great eventsâ?technical and spiritualâ?of our lifetime.In this remarkable book, Michael Collins conveys, in a very personal way, the drama, beauty, and humor of that adventure. He also traces his development from his first flight experiences in the air force, through his days as a test pilot, to his Apollo 11 space walk, presenting an evocative picture of the joys of flight as well as a new perspective on time, light, and movement from someone who has seen the fragile Earth from the other side of the moon.

Comments: (7)
Roru
I had seen this book many years ago and thought I would read it later and never did. However, I read some other Apollo program related books and had seen high praise for this book and purchased it.

What was I waiting for? This is an outstanding book. Collins has written a fantastic book that in many ways relates the inner thoughts of someone who participated in this extraordinary venture. I believe this was the first and frankly, probably the best book on the subject from the astronauts. Having seen some extended interviews he has done in recent years, the immediate realization is that the book is exactly like the person. The cadence and wry sense of humor. Fantastic. Honest. Frank.

The book is lengthy and is about as much of a page-turner such a book is going to get in this context. I enjoyed the account very much, including the foreword buy Charles Lindbergh. This explained much of what was going on with Apollo 11, but also Gemini as well.

Highly recommended.
Malalrajas
I recently came across Carrying the Fire by Michael Collins about a week and a half ago. I thought to myself “Who is Michael Collins?” I knew who he was of course, but was wondering what business he had writing a book. After all, he was the “third guy” on Apollo 11, the oft-forgotten Command Module Pilot while Neil and Buzz had their moment in history. If you had to read a book from anybody, why him?

It had great reviews and I picked it up because of this. I figured he might have a unique perspective on the whole ordeal by not being in the limelight and the reviews did not disappoint. I found it a wonderful book by a fantastic astronaut who is realistic and down to Earth with his words while still being able to let his rhetoric soar towards the Moon when it is needed.

The book covers his entire time in the space program (and slightly before) in a roughly autobiographical fashion. His descriptions of Gemini 10 and Apollo 11 are fantastic and you are left feeling that you are along with him in his tiny spacecraft for days on end; the writing at this point almost seems like a thriller. You get to hear about the struggles that are little-known with being an astronaut and the challenges involved in getting to the moon. You get an idea of his peers and their differing attitudes, personalities, and skills. With this book I felt I had a surprisingly personal and up-close view of NASA, the astronauts, and the race to the moon in the 1960s that nothing else seemed to capture.

The book is not without its flaws as tiny as they are. Collins seems very pragmatic and down to Earth, and you sometimes fault him for not having his head-in-the-clouds a bit more, but he is himself in this book and that is commendable. He didn't use a ghost writer and that shows. You can’t much fault him much for this and it’s a rather minor point! The book was also written in the early 1970s which makes it dated. This works both ways, for good and for bad. On the negative side, some parts seem outdated and there is much optimistic speculation but little fact on how the space program played out after the Apollo program. On a positive note the optimism displayed is shocking because much of it is wrong. Collins expected us to be on Mars by now and the fact that we aren't is surprising. Another positive is that the writing is fresh and not being recalled decades after the fact. The book has a new forward by the author, but a new version with a “final chapter” by Collins would close it out wonderfully. Collins, being in his 80s, would be nice to hear from with a retrospect to the book.

I’d recommend this to anyone with any interest in the Gemini, Apollo, or the 1960s space race in general. Other space fans might also be pleased but this is the period the book focuses on. It gives a close-up and personal view of NASA in the 1960s from the perspective of one of the luckiest astronauts to have lived. While he wasn’t one of the “big guys” who walked on the moon he was there on the landmark Apollo 11 flight and he gives a unique perspective on the affair that none other can. Coupled with wonderful and insightful writing, this is a fantastic book indeed.
Abuseyourdna
Michael Collins has a genuine gift with prose; he describes precisely and with flair, has a deadpan wit that can be as dry as the desert and as innocent as a lamb, and is simply the finest writer of the Mercury-Gemini-Apollo astronauts. His book gives a first-hand account not only of the selection process that he endured, but the hectic, colorful, Astro-A-Go-Go world of Houston in the Sixties.

He somehow resists the urge to turn his story into self-adulation, bully pulpit, or tedium; an urge that seemingly overpowered many of his fellow astronauts when they 'wrote' their own books. His 'reporter's eye' and droll wit is especially surprising in someone that is a military academy graduate, career officer (he retired with great distinction as a lieutenant general), and a trained engineer.

Collin's description of the training and flight of Gemini 10 with 'Corned Beef' John Young is vivid and arresting. His narration of his space walk is so entrancing that it settled the question -- at least, for me -- what it was truly like 'up there'.

Apollo 11, the Big Enchilada, is one of the book's finest segments. Collins gives readers such a sense of belonging to the mission themselves that it is irresistible. He describes the training in the simulators, the torture in the 'Vomit Comet' and the 'G-Wheel', and how it was to work with Armstrong and Aldrin. In this last, he is frank and candid. As he notes, it is difficult to have so many 'overachieving sons of overachievers' working together without some friction. He relates a small flare between the other two, after a 'crash' on the lunar surface during simulator training. This incident later appeared, nearly verbatim in the magnificent Tom Hanks 'From Earth to Moon' series.

Collins also takes particular care to pay homage and respect to the most unappreciated and neglected of the astronaut's support system -- his wife, Patricia. By the way, he and Patricia are still married (to each other), for about a half century, having been married at Chambley, France, which happens to be where I was born. Although I doubt that the two events are related. At least, one hopes so.

This book also has the advantage of giving color and life to other books about the space program, particularly Andrew Chaikin's wonderful 'A Man on the Moon: The Voyages of the Apollo Astronauts', and Gene Kranz's 'Failure Is Not An Option'.

Collins has that most difficult-to-exercise gift of the writer -- what to leave on the cutting room floor. I always found myself feeling, as I do with a great actor, of wanting just a little more. He never over-explains, and his description, even of the most prosaic and mundane things, is terse, apt, and still vibrant and vivid. I believe that he could write a pilot's checklist and make it absorbing. This is one of the books that I buy in bulk, and give away. Not only is it a record of a fascinating time in history, but it is a fine example of how such a tale should be written.

A small aside about the humor in the book; there is a footnote regarding radio procedures among fighter pilots that is simply one of the funniest things that I've ever read. How many footnotes have ever made you laugh aloud? I read the book (in one sitting, I might add, and yes -- it's that good) while occupying a booth next to a plate-glass window in a tavern during an afternoon of mixed thundershowers and blasting sunlight. When I read that particular bon mot, I roared, causing the other customers to stare and the waitress to bring me a glass of water and ask if I were all right.

I also owe a personal debt to Michael Collins. My brilliant and beautiful wife, Diane, are getting ready to retire. When our financial adviser asked me to describe my goals for a perfect retirement, I thought for a moment, and paraphrased something that Collins had said in his magnificent book: "Sitting on the porch in the evening, and talking to my wife."
eBooks Related to Carrying the Fire: An Astronaut's Journeys
Contacts | Privacy Policy | DMCA
All rights reserved.
lycee-pablo-picasso.fr © 2016-2020