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eBook Gringos in Paradise: An American Couple Builds Their Retirement Dream House in a Seaside Village in Mexico epub

by Barry Golson

eBook Gringos in Paradise: An American Couple Builds Their Retirement Dream House in a Seaside Village in Mexico epub
  • ISBN: 0743276361
  • Author: Barry Golson
  • Genre: Biographies
  • Subcategory: Professionals & Academics
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: Scribner; Reprint edition (December 9, 2008)
  • Pages: 312 pages
  • ePUB size: 1559 kb
  • FB2 size 1430 kb
  • Formats lrf azw lit txt


In 2004, Barry Golson wrote an article for AARP magazine about Mexican hot spots for retirees longing for a lifestyle . As much about family and friendship as about house-building, this book is about finding a personal paradise and making it a home. From publisher description.

In 2004, Barry Golson wrote an article for AARP magazine about Mexican hot spots for retirees longing for a lifestyle they couldn't afford in the United States. A year later, he and his wife Thia joined in the growing trend: they sold their Manhattan apartment, packed up their SUV, moved to the surfing and fishing village of Sayulita ( population 1,500) on Mexico's Pacific coast, and spent a year settling into their new life and planning and building their dream home.

Golson's book tells about building a retirement house in Mexico, but between the lines it's really about the harder job of building a new life. I won't be surprised if Gringos in Paradise becomes the newest bona fide Boomer Bible. - James Morgan, author of Chasing Matisse: A Year in France Living My Dream. Gringos in Paradise is well written and exceedingly entertaining, full of rich anecdotes and plainspoken advice. It's proof that reinventing your life in retirement is anything but a crazy idea. Moving and hilarious. - AARP the Magazine.

Gringos in Paradise book. village on Mexico's Pacific coast. After a real estate broker showed the couple some properties, they bought a hilltop plot of land in Sayulita, on impulse

Gringos in Paradise book. After a real estate broker showed the couple some properties, they bought a hilltop plot of land in Sayulita, on impulse. The couple did not even receive a deed to the property, just a promise that that the land was theirs and everything would be fine. The couple spent time learning the culture and about how things were done (or were not done in Mexico).

In 2004, Barry Golson wrote an award-winning article for AARP magazine about Mexican hot spots for retirees longing for a lifestyle they couldn't afford in the United States. A year later, he and his wife Thia were taking part in the growing trend of retiring abroad.

In 2004, Barry Golson wrote an award-winning article for AARP magazine . An excellant book on living with Mexico, not in an American 'compound'.

Gringos in Paradise : An American Couple Builds Their Retirement Dream House in a Seaside Village in Mexico. In 2004, Barry Golson wrote an award-winning article for AARP magazine about Mexican hot spots for retirees longing for a lifestyle they couldn't afford in the United States. Inforamative on the need to adjust expectation to a different style of living.

It had become an expat retirement belt of sorts, home to some 50,000 Americans

It had become an expat retirement belt of sorts, home to some 50,000 Americans. Meanwhile, he was facing the end of his own working life. After a 35-year career, Golson suddenly found himself put out to pasture, a relic in the youth-focused magazine business. For him, like so many others his age, the prospect of early retirement was alarming rather than welcome.

Download PDF book format. ISBN: 1919692118 Author: Kruger, John. Publication & Distribution: Halfway House, South Africa. Development Bank of Southern Africa, (c). Choose file format of this book to download: pdf chm txt rtf doc. Download this format book. Gringos in paradise : an American couple builds their retirement dream house in a seaside village in Mexico Barry Golson. Book's title: Gringos in paradise : an American couple builds their retirement dream house in a seaside village in Mexico Barry Golson. Library of Congress Control Number: 2006045807. 3.

Additional Product Features. Trade Paperback (US),Unsewn, Adhesive Bound. Travel & Holiday Guides: General. Scribner Book Company. Country of Publication. Best-selling in Non-Fiction Books.

An excerpt from "Gringos in Paradise" by Barry Golson, a book about building a house in the . Barry Golson and his wife Thia had a dream - move to a Mexican beach town and build their dream house.

An excerpt from "Gringos in Paradise" by Barry Golson, a book about building a house in the Mexican beach town of Sayulita, and life living in Mexico. But they didn’t count on the endless delays, sweet relationships, and the thicket of Mexican red tape that would turn the job into an ordeal. Through it all, we get to experience the day-to-day excitement of the progress of the building and the pitfalls.

A Year in Provence meets Mr. Blandings Builds His Dream House in this lively and entertaining account of a couple's year building their dream house in Mexico. In 2004, Barry Golson wrote an award-winning article for AARP magazine about Mexican hot spots for retirees longing for a lifestyle they couldn't afford in the United States. A year later, he and his wife Thia were taking part in the growing trend of retiring abroad. They sold their Manhattan apartment, packed up their SUV, and moved to one of those idyllic hot spots, the surfing and fishing village of Sayulita on Mexico's Pacific coast. With humor and charm, Golson details the year he and his wife spent settling into their new life and planning and building their dream home. Sayulita -- population 1,500, not including stray dogs or pelicans -- is a never-dull mixture of traditional Mexican customs and new, gringo-influenced change. Before long, the Golsons had been absorbed into the rhythms and routines of village life: they adopted a pair of iguanas named Iggy Pop and Iggy Mom, got sick and got cured by a doctor who charged them sixteen dollars a visit, made lasting friends with Mexicans and fellow expatriates, and discovered the skill and artistry of local craftsmen. But their daily lives were mostly dedicated to the difficult yet satisfying process of building their house. It took them almost six months to begin building -- nothing is simple (or speedy) in Mexico -- and incredibly, they completed construction in another six. They engaged a Mexican architect, builder, and landscape designer who not only built their home but also changed their lives; encountered uproariously odd bureaucracy; and ultimately experienced a lifetime's worth of education about the challenges and advantages of living in Mexico. The Golsons lived (and are still living) the dream of many -- not only of going off to a tropical paradise but also of building something beautiful, becoming a part of a new world, making lasting friends, and transforming their lives. As much about family and friendship as about house-building, Gringos in Paradise is an immensely readable and illuminating book about finding a personal paradise and making it a home.
Comments: (7)
Celace
Great insight into the process, experience of moving to Mexico, re-establishing a home base in a foreign land. Very well written, I felt present with them each step of the way. The approach of the author was to show honor to the 'true' residents of this small Mexico village by the sea, learning to trust those he met, as they began the process of buying land, building their dream home. Lessons were learned, friendships established, and a most beautiful house was built by the end of the book. The author doesn't portray he and his wife as "lucky Mexico, we are here!", but rather "how lucky we are, to be living in your Mexico" The respect for the locals came through loud and clear and that made their journey shared even more inviting for me!
Charyoll
Having just completed out first year living in a different small seaside town in Mexico, I can attest to the authenticity of Barry and Thia's experiences and appreciate their outlook on living in Mexico. I found myself following my husband around, reading passages out loud to him, i.e., "You've got to hear this!" Golson does an especially good job of describing the naivete with which they (and we) began the experience and the incremental ways they learned to love a side of Mexico you can only experience as a resident.

The hopes and the frustrations involved in building a home here are accurately and humorously described. But for me, the real value of this book is the unpretentious way he describes the development of their deep affection for Mexico and Mexicans. My husband and I have reached the same conclusions, through a series of experiences that are very similar to theirs.

If you are considering a move to Mexico, this is an instructive read - not so much for the information about homebuilding (although it IS helpful and accurate) but more for the story of acclimation to a culture that is SO much more different than you could ever imagine.

Many authors have taken advantage of the growing trend to move south and we have read most of them. Along with Don Adam's book (Head for Mexico), this is the one I would recommend.
Cktiell
A reader would have to have worked hard to miss the series of books written over the last 20 years about those with income aplenty building their dream homes abroad, including Peter Mayle's "A Year in Provence" and Frances Mayes' "Under the Tuscan Sun". Each of those books examined the difference between the local community portrayed and building back at home. Each told stories of little risk, a little frustration, and the great reward of adding another cultural experience to an otherwise priviledged life.

This book differs from that genre in that it is written from the perspective of the 50+ year old author and his wife, who, having found themselves cast out jobs, with little in the way of pension plan or the assets (a house or two) accumulated during a lifetime, pick up and move to Mexico. In doing so, they place everything at risk.

While "Gringos Abroad" has the usual good architect/bad builder stories (or vice versa), the story told here adds an examination of how the author, being faced with the risk of a mid- (or is it late-) life change, made the decision to move on. Gringos Abroad is filled with more introspective stories that touch upon the decision making process, making this book far less precious others in the genre.

While reading the book, I confess drifting away from the village of Sayulita, where the book is set, and thinking about a move to Provence or Tuscany, but wondering whether I'd be able to find neighbors like the Golsons there. For a person considering move under circumstances similar to the author's, this might be the book that sends the reader packing.
Bil
I just completed the book. I couldn't put it down! The author, a professional writer, penned a well-written classic tale of his first year in a small Pacific-coast town wherein he builds a fairly fancy house with his wife. All their ups and downs are described in great humorous detail, but what I appreciated the most were his comments about the insights he gained about the Mexican people in his dealings with the male workers he employed in constructing his house. As someone considering a move to Mexico, I found his hard-earned insights extremely valuable. I heartily recommend this book to anyone considering a move to Mexico, especially if you are thinking of building a house down there, in which case it's invaluable.
Mozel
While I agree with others, a few more figures would have been useful, but leaving the numbers out does make the writing a little more timeless. For example, the community the Golson's chose was already feeling the rampant growth that happens when we gringo's discover a town when they got there. They probably paid more than an early arrival, and clearly a lot less than a more recent one.

What I loved about the book was it spent a good bit of time talking about some of the other challenges faced, and the emotions that evolve from that. Early in their adventure they had a couple of experiences with the health care system, and they talked about the incumbent fears. Very useful, and also very comforting.

I'm glad I chose this as my "first" book as we approach a decision in the next few years. It took me out of thinking of it only as a "numbers" game, and helped us work through some of the deeper issues.
Unirtay
Well written and captivating. Additionally a cautionary tale. It had me longing for the simple life where folks met walking through the plaza and electrical outages were just part of the lifestyle. Then I became saddened when they became consumed by the building of a large, perfect, financially draining house. I was hoping for a happily ever after, I didn't get that feeling as the story ended.
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