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eBook A Desperate Passion: An Autobiography epub

by Helen Caldicott

eBook A Desperate Passion: An Autobiography epub
  • ISBN: 0393316807
  • Author: Helen Caldicott
  • Genre: Biographies
  • Subcategory: Professionals & Academics
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: W. W. Norton & Company (November 17, 1997)
  • Pages: 384 pages
  • ePUB size: 1836 kb
  • FB2 size 1992 kb
  • Formats lrf azw txt lit


Helen Caldicott is an internationally recognized antinuclear activist, cofounder of Physicians for Social Responsibility, and founder of the Women’s Action for Nuclear Disarmament and the International Physicians to Save the Environment. She lives in Australia.

A Desperate Passion is Caldicott's engaging, inspiring memoir, chronicling her life both on and off the scene. And all of us are probably better off as a result" (East Bay Express Books)-but Caldicott, wife and mother of three, found that her success did not come without cost

A Desperate Passion is Caldicott's engaging, inspiring memoir, chronicling her life both on and off the scene. Raised in Australia and trained as a physician, she first found her voice protesting French nuclear tests in the Pacific. And all of us are probably better off as a result" (East Bay Express Books)-but Caldicott, wife and mother of three, found that her success did not come without cost. This is a personal story too, a candid, revealing self-portrait of a woman who has not relinquished her remarkable efforts to save the world.

A desperate passion : an autobiography. A desperate passion : an autobiography. by. Caldicott, Helen. Books for People with Print Disabilities. Caldicott, Helen, Pacifists, Nuclear disarmament. Internet Archive Books. Uploaded by sf-loadersive. org on December 15, 2009.

A Desperate Passion: An Autobiography. Norton & Company.

Helen Mary Caldicott (born 7 August 1938) is an Australian physician, author, and anti-nuclear advocate who has founded several associations dedicated to opposing the use of nuclear power, depleted uranium munitions, nuclear weapons, nuclear weapons proliferation, and military action in general. A Desperate Passion: An Autobiography.

A Desperate Passion book. A Desperate Passion is Caldicott's engaging, inspiring memoir, chronicling her life both on and off the scene. Years later she rose to international prominence, "Dr. Helen Caldicott," the Sunday San Francisco Chronicle declares, "is back on the scene. Helen Caldicott is an internationally recognized antinuclear activist, cofounder of Physicians for Social Responsibility, and founder of the Women’s Action for Nuclear Disarmament and the International Physicians to Save the Environment.

This autobiography by Helen Caldicott is stunning in the information it offers. Caldicott is one of the most important women of our century and her discussion with Ronald Reagan's daughter is worth the price of the book alone

This autobiography by Helen Caldicott is stunning in the information it offers. Caldicott is one of the most important women of our century and her discussion with Ronald Reagan's daughter is worth the price of the book alone. Caldicott as a nationally renown antinuclear activist -full of knowledge and bravier in her cause, had the credentials and intelligence to fight the good fight and her memoir of her adventures in doing so opens the eyes wide and fills the mind with jarring reality

And all of us are probably better off as a result" (East Bay Express Books)-but Caldicott, wife and mother of three, found that her success did not come without cost

She showed me what one set-on-fire human being can do to shift the consciousness of the world.

A Desperate Passion is Caldicott's engaging, inspiring memoir . Driven by intense passions, she seems to have adopted the world's population as her children

Tell us if something is incorrect. Dr. Driven by intense passions, she seems to have adopted the world's population as her children.

"She showed me what one set-on-fire human being can do to shift the consciousness of the world." ―Sister Helen Prejean, author of Dead Man Walking

"Dr. Helen Caldicott," the Sunday San Francisco Chronicle declares, "is back on the scene." A Desperate Passion is Caldicott's engaging, inspiring memoir, chronicling her life both on and off the scene. Raised in Australia and trained as a physician, she first found her voice protesting French nuclear tests in the Pacific. Years later she rose to international prominence, founding Physicians for Social Responsibility, "which did perhaps more than any other group to thrust the nuclear issue under the public eye" (New York Times). "Driven by intense passions, she seems to have adopted the world's population as her children. And all of us are probably better off as a result" (East Bay Express Books)―but Caldicott, wife and mother of three, found that her success did not come without cost. This is a personal story too, a candid, revealing self-portrait of a woman who has not relinquished her remarkable efforts to save the world.
Comments: (5)
Grillador
Now more than ever we need a generation to be informed of the dangers of nuclear war. Clearly, our President elect isn't aware. Nor does he show any interest in being informed about this and many other important matters concerning the longevity of the planet.
Dr. Caldicott engaged more than 20,000 MDs to rally for this cause in the 80s. We need her story told and her activism re-ignited. Thank you Dr. Caldicott for writing this important Autobiography.
OwerSpeed
Helen Mary Caldicott (born 1938) is an Australian physician, author, radio show host, and anti-nuclear advocate, who has also written Nuclear Power Is Not the Answer,War in Heaven: The Arms Race in Outer Space,If You Love This Planet: A Plan to Save the Earth (Revised and updated),Nuclear Madness: What You Can Do, etc.

She said in the first chapter of this 1996 book, "I have ... an intense and unreasonable fear of death, which has plagued me all my life. Clearly this is one of the reasons I decided to study medicine." (Pg. 15) After a life-threatening illness, she thought, "I knew that I had been saved for a reason. My life in a strange way almost didn't belong to me anymore. I felt that I would be called upon to act in service, not to myself or even my family but to something greater." (Pg. 96) While studying intensely for a medical exam, she admits, "Often I sent the kids out of the room when they needed me because I required absolute quiet in order to concentrate ... I feel bad about this now, and I wish I hadn't been so single-minded and had given them the time when they needed it. After all, what was more important, my career or my children?" (Pg. 130)

Of her December 1982 meeting with President Reagan, she wrote, "It had been the most disconcerting hour and a quarter of my life. Reagan reminded me of ... [a] character whose entire life experience came from watching TV and films. Certainly President Reagan had been unfailingly pleasant and courteous to me, but the last thing the world needed was a nice but totally uninformed old guy who might just decide to commit it to radioactive dust." (Pg. 265)

Of her organization, Physicians for Social Responsibility, she recalls, "To all of us who cared about it, it was much more than an organization: it was a kind of surrogate family whose members loved and trusted each other, working together with tremendous energy and creativity... our trust in each other had been shattered. We never recovered... The organization we had created was being destroyed." (Pg. 273-274) Later, she admits, "I learned that, to a degree, I had become arrogant, that I needed to encompass humility within the equation of my life---a difficult lesson to learn at any time particularly for a physician." (Pg. 293) She agonizes, "Why had the peace movement failed? Why had we fared so badly? There were a couple of obvious answers. People didn't like our criticism of President Reagan, who appeared to be so strong and authoritative. I believe that at a fundamental level people enjoy being cared for by supposedly strong leaders ... And Reagan fitted this pattern." (Pg. 307)

Interestingly, she says, "While I appreciate the sense of community derived within churches, I never found any sense of God or a higher power within religious groups. Nevertheless, they are full of wonderful people who do extraordinary things for their fellow human beings." (Pg. 229) She concludes on the note, "Never in all those years of political activity did I believe the arms race and the Cold War would end... But they did end---a miracle occurred. The work of the international peace movement helped to pave the way for a Russian, Mikhail Gorbachev, to perform the final act... This, I believe, was the single most important event of the twentieth century. When the Cold War ended, so did my desperation. And my spiritual work now provided its replacement---a joyful passion for life in all its aspects." (Pg. 354)

Caldicott has been almost forgotten in many quarters now, but her story is still of immense interest to any progressives and peace advocates interested in social struggles.
GAZANIK
Helen Caldicott tells her story on two levels: her fight against uninformed, uninterested and unmotivated politicians ( and the public at that time) to expose the dangers of nuclear energy - and her disarmingly honest look at the toll such a fight took on her marriage and family. I found her book fascinating in both relms. It educated me about the terrible danger to the miners and others exposed to the minerals used in these plants. It frightened me to think of what is happening now in Japan and what dangers those people are experiencing - perhaps not wholly disclosed by the nuclear power plant officials.
But equally interesting were all the psychological insights into her family and herself that Dr. Caldicott so generously and with deep honesty shares. Many many thanks to this scientist for her dedication and humble forthrightness. There is so much wisdom in this book...
Kegal
I wavered between giving this three and four stars, but decided on three stars for folks who don't know anything about Caldicott. Those of us who are either already fans of her personally, or care deeply about anti-nuclear and environmental issues, would more likely give it at least four stars. Dr. Caldicott is an inspiration to anyone who either wants to make a difference in the world, or fears that no one person can. She started on her anti-nuclear campaign as an Australian pediatrician and concerned mother -- writing an angry letter to the editor about French nuclear tests in the South Pacific (which did not get published) -- and went on to found Physicians for Social Responsibility and to inspire millions. I've seen Dr. Caldicott speak twice, and she's a marvel. She has authored other books, _Missile Envy_ and _If You Love This Planet_ among them, about more specific issues; this is a very personal account, in which she is honest about her failures, disappointments, setbacks, loneliness, and fear of death. But it is ultimately a triumph of the will and spirit. I wish her many more years of health, happiness, and successful activism.
GoodBuyMyFriends
An unexciting, uninvolving autobiography. Where's the "passion"? The history is interesting to a point, but the nitty-gritty seems to be lacking. Given Caldicott's powerful speech making and her powerful writing in If You Love This Planet, this desiccated book is a big disappointment. People and events simply don't come alive here.
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