» » Orange Is the New Black: My Year in a Women's Prison

eBook Orange Is the New Black: My Year in a Women's Prison epub

by Piper Kerman

eBook Orange Is the New Black: My Year in a Women's Prison epub
  • ISBN: 0385523394
  • Author: Piper Kerman
  • Genre: Biographies
  • Subcategory: Regional U.S.
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: Spiegel & Grau (March 8, 2011)
  • Pages: 327 pages
  • ePUB size: 1882 kb
  • FB2 size 1152 kb
  • Formats mbr mobi txt rtf


The book was adapted into the Netflix original comedy-drama series Orange Is the New Black.

On July 11, 2013, Netflix started Orange Is the New Black, an original series based on this work.

Start by marking Orange Is the New Black as Want to Read . With a career, a boyfriend, and a loving family, Piper Kerman barely resembles the reckless young woman who delivered a suitcase of drug money ten years before

Start by marking Orange Is the New Black as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read. With a career, a boyfriend, and a loving family, Piper Kerman barely resembles the reckless young woman who delivered a suitcase of drug money ten years before. But that past has caught up with her. Convicted and sentenced to fifteen months at the infamous federal correctional facility in Danbury, Connecticut, the well-heeled Smith College alumna is now inmate - With a career, a boyfriend, and a loving family, Piper Kerman barely resembles the reckless young woman who delivered a suitcase of drug money ten years before.

Электронная книга "Orange Is the New Black: My Year in a Women's Prison", Piper Kerman. Эту книгу можно прочитать в Google Play Книгах на компьютере, а также на устройствах Android и iOS. Выделяйте текст, добавляйте закладки и делайте. Выделяйте текст, добавляйте закладки и делайте заметки, скачав книгу "Orange Is the New Black: My Year in a Women's Prison" для чтения в офлайн-режиме.

This book is a memoir, and is drawn from my own experience.

My Year in a Women’s Prison. To my mother and father. This book is a memoir, and is drawn from my own experience.

The book was very informative - it displayed women bonding in a situation that is less than desirable for most of the human population. Piper Kerman's real-life story chronicling her year in prison is insightful and thought-provoking. While most women, when put together with other women in cramped up places usually proves as challenging and scary, Piper Kerman talked about the positives when it came to serving time together. She included many details that the show leaves out - it was nice to actually get in her head and feel the emotions of doing time. At times the writing impressed me, like this vivid description: "Miss Sanchez had long Frito-chip fingernails painted Barbie pink.

Ten years after her minor role in an international drug ring, Piper Kerman leaves her bourgeois, lefty, New .

Ten years after her minor role in an international drug ring, Piper Kerman leaves her bourgeois, lefty, New York City lifestyle for a 15-month stint in a minimum-security federal prison.

I started watching the Netflix series Orange Is the New Black after it was brought up during the weekly book club I have been .

I started watching the Netflix series Orange Is the New Black after it was brought up during the weekly book club I have been attending at a maximum security prison. The show is based off of an autobiographical book written Piper Kerman, who served a 13 month sentence in federal minimum security prison for drug related crime. After enjoying the show, I decided to check out the book and see what Piper’s actual experience behind bars was like, sans Netflix. The book Orange is the New Black: My Year in a Women’s Prison by Piper Kerman is a fast read and a page turner and you feel like you are right there with her.

And while in prison, Piper doesn't see much lesbian action: The next day was Valentine's Day, my first holiday in prison.

She may be known as Piper Chapman on Netflix's Orange is the New Black, but her real name is Piper Kerman, and her 2010 memoir, Orange Is the New Black: My Year in a Women's Prison, served as the basis for the now hit show. If you've been wondering how the book compares to the series, here are the most noticeable differences: 1. Piper was not in the same prison as her drug-dealing ex-girlfriend. And while in prison, Piper doesn't see much lesbian action: The next day was Valentine's Day, my first holiday in prison.

#1 NEW YORK TIMES BESTSELLER • NOW A NETFLIX ORIGINAL SERIES   With a career, a boyfriend, and a loving family, Piper Kerman barely resembles the reckless young woman who delivered a suitcase of drug money ten years before. But that past has caught up with her. Convicted and sentenced to fifteen months at the infamous federal correctional facility in Danbury, Connecticut, the well-heeled Smith College alumna is now inmate #11187–424—one of the millions of people who disappear “down the rabbit hole” of the American penal system. From her first strip search to her final release, Kerman learns to navigate this strange world with its strictly enforced codes of behavior and arbitrary rules. She meets women from all walks of life, who surprise her with small tokens of generosity, hard words of wisdom, and simple acts of acceptance. Heartbreaking, hilarious, and at times enraging, Kerman’s story offers a rare look into the lives of women in prison—why it is we lock so many away and what happens to them when they’re there.   Praise for Orange Is the New Black   “Fascinating . . . The true subject of this unforgettable book is female bonding and the ties that even bars can’t unbind.”People (four stars)   “I loved this book. It’s a story rich with humor, pathos, and redemption. What I did not expect from this memoir was the affection, compassion, and even reverence that Piper Kerman demonstrates for all the women she encountered while she was locked away in jail. I will never forget it.”—Elizabeth Gilbert, author of Eat, Pray, Love   “This book is impossible to put down because [Kerman] could be you. Or your best friend. Or your daughter.”Los Angeles Times   “Moving . . . transcends the memoir genre’s usual self-centeredness to explore how human beings can always surprise you.”USA Today   “It’s a compelling awakening, and a harrowing one—both for the reader and for Kerman.”Newsweek   Look for special features inside. Join the Random House Reader’s Circle for author chats and more.
Comments: (7)
Invissibale
Like most people, I was first introduced to this story from the show on Netflix. While waiting for the new season to come out it prompted me to buy the book and see how similar it was to Hollywood's spin on things. The book is MUCH different than the show. And better. The book, while it is a memoir written by Piper, makes her out to be a much better person than the Piper on the TV show. Now, if you haven't read the book or seen the TV show and you have plans to, I suggest you stop reading because there are SPOILERS ahead....

The real Piper, whose last name is Kerman and not Chapman, didn't seem as conniving or crazy as the TV show Piper. She didn't take part in a dirty panties operation, didn't do her time with Alex Voss (only a few short weeks when they were testifying in Chicago), and never got starved by the head kitchen worker. As an avid reader, I get it - the book is always different than when Hollywood takes over and makes dramatic effect on it.

The book was very informative - it displayed women bonding in a situation that is less than desirable for most of the human population. While most women, when put together with other women in cramped up places usually proves as challenging and scary, Piper Kerman talked about the positives when it came to serving time together. She included many details that the show leaves out - it was nice to actually get in her head and feel the emotions of doing time.

I'm giving it 4 stars because it took me a little longer to finish than other books. While not a bad book, there were parts where I had a hard time focusing because it felt repetitive and unnecessary. If you were into the TV show, check this out. While there are shades of similarities, the book is extremely different than what Netflix has shared with us.
Spilberg
Prison fascinates and horrifies me. My favorite TV show is Prison Break, so I thought I'd give Orange is the New Black show a try. While the TV show wasn't for me, I'm glad I read this memoir about an upper-middle-class woman who goes to prison for a year. I had the pleasure of meeting the author at a book reading/signing at a women's prison, and she is lovely in real life.

Piper Kerman's real-life story chronicling her year in prison is insightful and thought-provoking.

At times the writing impressed me, like this vivid description:

"Miss Sanchez had long Frito-chip fingernails painted Barbie pink."

There are interesting insights into prison life.

"Prison is quite literally a ghetto in the most classic sense of the word, a place where the US government not puts not only the dangerous but also the inconvenient--people who are mentally ill, people who are addicts, people who are poor and uneducated and unskilled. Meanwhile, the ghetto in the outside world is a prison as well, and a much more difficult one to escape from. In fact, there is basically a revolving door between our urban and rural ghettos and the formal ghetto of our prison system."

My favorite "character" is the Russian wife of a mobster, Pop. Pop is the head cook, and gives invaluable advice to Piper.

This story makes the reader inevitably wonder how she would handle imprisonment. I resonated with Piper helping an inmate write a paper. I also would try to fit exercise into my daily routine to stay sane. But really, it's hard to imagine how awful imprisonment would be.

The groping from male guards infuriated me:

"Other male COs were brazen, like the short, red-faced young bigmouth who asked me loudly and repeatedly, "Where are the weapons of mass destruction?" while he fondled me and I gritted my teeth.

There was absolutely no payoff for filing a complaint. A female prisoner who alleges sexual misconduct on the part of a guard is invariably locked in the SHU in "protective custody", losing her housing assignment, program actives, work assignment, and a host of other prison privileges, not to mention the comfort of her routine and friends."

I like how prison statistics (like one out of 100 adults are locked up in the US) are told factually without a preachy tone. I'm also glad Piper mentioned feeling remorse for trafficking drugs--the very drugs that may have been used by her fellow inmates as part of their crimes. I can get behind the decriminalization of drugs for personal use, but I disagree with the notion that drug dealers are never violent.

Overall, a good read, and I'm impressed Piper is giving back by teaching writing to prisoners.
SoSok
Just finished reading this fascinating book, so had to give it a review, particularly after reading a few of the negative comments, which I wanted to mention in case they put anyone off giving the book a try.

First off, yes, there is a television series based on the real life experiences of the author. Someone posted "they're so different, the tv show and the book - I don't know which is real!" The book is real, the show has added violence, drama, sex, otherwise it might be uninteresting to watch someone sit in a jail cell episode after episode. I enjoyed picking out the details from the real life account and seeing how they were woven into the more dramatic television show.

There were also critiques that the author comes off as boastful, self centered, etc. Yes, she's an educated middle class white female, and she mentions this often, but it references unfair stereotypes regarding race - it is not boastful, but an observation that white women are somehow not as expected by society to be in prison. I enjoyed her candid approach, there's humor, but also depth, as the author comes to terms with the crime she committed years prior to her incarceration.

It was a thoughtful and interesting read. She focuses on the day to day life in prison, interesting anecdotes, and stories of those she met...and makes you think about our prison system and question its effectiveness.

My one critique was the abruptness of the ending, I would like to know more about how she settled back into her everyday life following her release.
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