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eBook The Great Swim epub

by Gavin Mortimer

eBook The Great Swim epub
  • ISBN: 0802717497
  • Author: Gavin Mortimer
  • Genre: Biographies
  • Subcategory: Specific Groups
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: Walker Books (May 4, 2009)
  • Pages: 336 pages
  • ePUB size: 1402 kb
  • FB2 size 1252 kb
  • Formats lrf lit azw lit


Gavin Nicholas Mortimer is a British writer and historian, specialising in World War Two Special Forces.

Gavin Nicholas Mortimer is a British writer and historian, specialising in World War Two Special Forces. Educated at Mill Hill School in north London, Mortimer's first book, the critically acclaimed Fields of Glory: the extraordinary lives of 16 warrior sportsmen was published in 2001 and described by the Sunday Telegraph as "inspiring reading"

Gavin Mortimer uses primary sources, diaries, interviews with relatives, and contemporary reports to paint an unforgettable . More than an underdog story, The Great Swim is a tale of perseverance, strength, and sheer force of will.

Gavin Mortimer uses primary sources, diaries, interviews with relatives, and contemporary reports to paint an unforgettable portrait of a competition that changed the way the world looked at women, both in sport and society. A portrait of an era that is as evocative as Cinderella Man, this is a memorable story of America and Americans in the 1920s. To read this book, upload an EPUB or FB2 file to Bookmate.

Books for People with Print Disabilities. Internet Archive Books. Uploaded by Lotu Tii on September 20, 2013.

Sports - General, Women, Sports & Recreation, General, Biography & Autobiography, Biography, Autobiography, Biography, English Channel, Long distance swimming, Swimmers, United States, Women swimmers, phy. Walker & Company. Books for People with Print Disabilities. SIMILAR ITEMS (based on metadata). Terms of Service (last updated 12/31/2014).

The dramatic story of the four courageous female swimmers who captivated the world in the summer of 1926.

com User, August 4, 2009. I greatly enjoyed this book for a number of reasons. As a swimmer it was very elucidating, shedding light on what is considered the greatest challenge in distance swimming. But as I stated in the title, this is more than just a book on the annals of Channel swimming. In fact, I would classify it as social history.

Gavin Mortimer - The Great Swim. In the Roaring Twenties, many doubted that a woman could swim the Channel, until one remarkable attempt. Adapted by Anita Sullivan from the book by Gavin Mortimer. In the roaring twenties the world was changing at an electric pace. In science, commerce and art, everything seemed possible and the challenges were there to be confronted

Gavin Mortimer uses primary sources, diaries, interviews with relatives, and contemporary reports to paint an unforgettable portrait of a competition that changed the way the world looked at women, both in sport and society.

Mortimer (The Longest Night: The Bombing of London on May 10, 1941, 2005, et. recounts the quest of four intrepid women who in the summer of 1926 attempted to become the first female to swim the turbulent English Channel. Mortimer (The Longest Night: The Bombing of London on May 10, 1941, 2005, et. Nineteen-year-old Gertrude Ederle, sponsored by Chicago Tribune owner and New York Daily News founder Joseph Patterson, had tried and failed the previous year.

Gavin Mortimer paints a vivid picture of the perils, agonies and frantic brouhaha endured . During practice swims, it sometimes took 20 minutes to restore the circulation to her hands.

Gavin Mortimer paints a vivid picture of the perils, agonies and frantic brouhaha endured by rival competitors when, during the summer of 1926, Ederle and three other American women battled to become the first female to conquer the notorious 21-mile stretch of sea between Calais and Dover. Mortimer's book, narrated with pacy enthusiasm and highlighted by the achievements of four largely forgotten heroines, is a fascinating and irresistible slice of sporting history.

Gavin Mortimer's story of the grit of these women cracks along like a Channel tide - " Daily Telegraph "Mortimer's . I thoroughly enjoyed this book. This was the great period of channel swimming and belongs peculiarly to the twenties.

Gavin Mortimer's story of the grit of these women cracks along like a Channel tide - " Daily Telegraph "Mortimer's tale, narrated with pacy enthusiasm, is a fascinating and irresistible slice of sporting history. The Daily Mail "Gavin Mortimer has unearthed one of the lost souls of twentieth-century history" TLS "The long-forgotten battles against cold, adverse tides, jellyfish and each other are marvellously brought back to life - " Sunday Times. Other than Gertrude Ederle the other lady challengers were unknown to me and their "can do" spirit is amazing.

I put my whole vocabulary of interjections to use while reading Gavin Mortimer‘s book The Great Swim .

I put my whole vocabulary of interjections to use while reading Gavin Mortimer‘s book The Great Swim (Walker Books, 2008). Mortimer, an English writer based in Paris, tells the story of four Americans who attempted in 1926 to become the first woman to swim the English Channel: Gertrude Ederle, Lillian Cannon, Amelia Gade, and Clarabelle Barrett. The woman who succeeded was Ederle, a 19-year-old Olympic swimmer who broke the existing record–set of course by a man–by nearly two hours. But while Ederle bested the rough seas of the Channel, she was unprepared for the media storm that engulfed her.

The dramatic story of the four courageous female swimmers who captivated the world in the summer of 1926. During the summer of 1926, the story that enthralled the public revolved around four young swimmers, Gertrude Ederle, Mille Gade, Lillian Cannon, and Clarabelle Barrette, who battled the weather, each other, and considerable odds to become the first woman to conquer the English Channel―and to become the latest darling of the American tabloid press. Gavin Mortimer paints an unforgettable portrait of a competition that changed the way the world looked at women, in both sport and society.

Comments: (7)
Djang
This book was great. The stories of the four American women who tried to swim the Channel in 1926 are far more interesting than I anticipated -- and the Channel swim itself is much more complicated. The story is well told and compelling. The story touches on so much more than just these women and their challenges -- it's about the culture wars of the 1920s, equality for women athletes, and the newspapers of the era. I enjoyed the book.

I read the book on my Kindle 3. The formatting was really, really bad, with so many OCR errors that some passages are almost incomprehensible. I was really disappointed. This is presumably not the author's fault, but the publisher's, which is why I did not factor it into my review -- I just want to note it for other Kindlers.
Quttaro
Really loved reading this. All about women swimming the English channel and what it was like in the 20s.
Skunk Black
Great book for women, swimmers or no. Great book for all swimmers. Thanks to my sister for the recommendation.
LivingCross
I don't remember this one, I mix it up with Young Woman and The Sea but essential reading for all those interested in Channel swimming.
Unsoo
I bought this as a gift for my father in law who is still competitively swimming. He read the book cover to cover and has since passed it through his entire club. An great read for anyone who loves the sport.
Bulace
A really great story, well told. A must-read for anyone interested in the history of open water swimming.
Taur
Interesting, historical, inspiring, contains lessons on life. I had not heard of the endeavors described in The Great Swim previously.
I didn't expect to like this as much as I did. I learned not just about the swim but the world of 1925-1926. This was the biggest event in the world at that time and then it disappeared. Shocking facts from 1926 include that men and sometimes women would compete in major races either in full-body suits or nude, Ederle invented the bikini, Churchill spoke against America in Parliament, American tourists were attacked by mobs in impoverished Paris. Ederle was briefly worshipped by hysterical fans reminiscent of the Beatlemania of the 1960s.

The author does not take sides in the rivalries between the swimmers and presents facts that put the great Ederle in various lights. It is acknowledged that Ederle went the easier route (France to England) which is no longer allowed by today's swimmers. The book ends with the presentation of the fact that Ederle's backers reserved every single tug boat to prevent them from being used by her competitors except one which was secured by Cannon. Did the presence of two tugs give Ederle an unfair advantage? Did the France to England route make it easier? The reader gets to decide.
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