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eBook Across Many Mountains: Three Daughters of Tibet epub

by Yangzom Brauen

eBook Across Many Mountains: Three Daughters of Tibet epub
  • ISBN: 0099546035
  • Author: Yangzom Brauen
  • Genre: Biographies
  • Subcategory: Specific Groups
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: Vintage Books; 1st Edition Thus edition (March 1, 2012)
  • ePUB size: 1498 kb
  • FB2 size 1881 kb
  • Formats rtf lrf mbr txt


324 pages, 8 unnumbered pages of plates : 24 cm. At a Free Tibet demonstration in Moscow in 2001, a Swiss actress is captured on film being arrested.

324 pages, 8 unnumbered pages of plates : 24 cm. s attention for her passion and her striking, Tibetan beauty. The result is this breathtaking book about Yangzom Brauen. s Tibetan heritage, and most particularly her extraordinary grandmother and mother, who fled Tibet in the early 1950s when the Chinese came to take their country away.

Start by marking Across Many Mountains: Three Daughters of Tibet as Want to Read . Many important stories lie hidden until the right person arrives to tell them

Start by marking Across Many Mountains: Three Daughters of Tibet as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read. Many important stories lie hidden until the right person arrives to tell them. Yangzom Brauen has rescued the story of her inspirational grandmother, writing a book full of love and endurance, and giving us a rare and vivid glimpse of life in rural Tibet before the arrival of the Chinese.

Most importantly, though, ACROSS MANY MOUNTAINS is a testament to three . Across Many Mountains - Yangzom Brauen

Read on the Scribd mobile app. Download the free Scribd mobile app to read anytime, anywhere. Across Many Mountains - Yangzom Brauen. Singing with a voice that tells us of Tibet, Mola sings as she sang as a young girl-and as a nun-when she lived the life of a hermit in a hut high in the Tibetan mountains.

Across Many Mountains. The Extraordinary Story of Three Generations of Women in Tibet. In Across Many Mountains Sonam’s daughter, Yangzom, born in safety in Switzerland, has written the story of her inspirational mother and grandmother’s fight for survival, and their lives in exile. It is an extraordinary story of determination, love and endurance.

Across Many Mountains: A Tibetan Family's Epic Journey from Oppression to Freedom. Author Yangzom Brauen is skilled in weaving the texture of Tibetan culture into her narrative – the practice of kora (walking around a sacred place absorbed in prayer), the chod ritual of cutting through the ego, sky burial rites, healing practices ( Carry our child four times around the holy lake Basum Tso and she will recover ), the eating of barley-based tsampa, the celebration.

Authors: Brauen, Yangzom. Across Many Mountains: Three Daughters of Tibet. Title: Across Many Mountains: Three Daughters of Tibet. Condition: Used; Good. Read full description.

Most importantly, though, ACROSS MANY MOUNTAINS is a testament to three strong, determined women who are .

A powerful, emotional memoir and an extraordinary portrait of three generations of Tibetan women whose lives are forever changed when Chairman Mao's Red Army crushes Tibetan independence, sending a young mother and her six-year-old daughter on a treacherous journey across the snowy Himalayas toward freedom. Kunsang thought she would never leave Tibet. One of the country's youngest Buddhist nuns, she grew up in a remote mountain village where, as a teenager, she entered the local nunnery.

Brauen, the daughter of Swiss ethnologist Martin Brauen and Tibetan artist Sonam Dolma Brauen, started her acting career with small roles in Swiss television series. She had her Hollywood debut in the film Aeon Flux in the role of Inari. Since then, she has played in various American independent productions including a minor role in Al Pacino's Salomaybe, an adaptation of Oscar Wilde's Salome and the leading part in the German film Asudem (2006) by Daryush Shokof  .

Across Many Mountains: Three Daughters of Tibet. Yangzom Brauen, translated by Katy Derbyshire. From the publisher: Kunsang thought she would never leave Tibet. Other Titles of Interest. Across Many Mountains: The Extraordinary Story of Three Generations of Women in Tibet.

Yangzom Brauen's Across Many Mountains, a triumphant tale of three generations of Tibetan women as they journey from Tibet to Switzerland, teaches us that there is much to learn from those who persevere in the face of injustice and the unknown

Yangzom Brauen's Across Many Mountains, a triumphant tale of three generations of Tibetan women as they journey from Tibet to Switzerland, teaches us that there is much to learn from those who persevere in the face of injustice and the unknown.

Across Many Mountains
Comments: (7)
Kanal
A great read telling the family history including great hardship and challenges written in such and engaging way that you really feel for the characters. There is no self pity and no melodramatics just strength and determination. Definitely recommended.
MrRipper
My wife and I, who have been to Tibet, loved this book. It was a great insight into Tibetan Buddhism and to the sweet primitiveness of the Tibetan people. It is also softly told, fitting the subject. We wish the author had written twenty others.
Rose Of Winds
Wonderful read that describes early life in Tibet and the transitions of 3 generations of women to the present. Heartfelt challenges with the tradition of compassion.
Celace
Overall pleased with the book. The spine of the book was a bit more broken than advertised, however.
Hasirri
Amazing insight to a neglected culture
Samugor
“When the iron bird flies and horses run on wheels, the Tibetan people will be scattered like ants across the face of the earth, and Buddhist teachings will reach the land of the red man.” This 1200 year old prophecy was proven true in 1950 when the Chinese overran Tibet, eventually killing over 1.5 million Tibetans and destroying most of Tibet’s sacred monasteries.

Across Many Mountains is a fabulous read and inspiring testimony to the lives of Tibetan refugees. Initially, it introduces us to Kungsang Wangmo, a Tibetan nun in the Nyingma Buddhist tradition, who contrary to tradition, marries a Tibetan monk. With her young daughters, Kungsang escapes from the Chinese, crossing the high, frozen Himalayas on foot at night, in search of sanctuary in India. There, in a refugee camp, she raises Sonam, who later gives birth to Yangzom Brauen, the author, of this eloquent narrative of three generations of Tibetans.

This biography reads like a novel, yet is rich in the vivid details of Tibetan culture, the Chinese occupation, refugee life, and resettlement in the West. Seamlessly, Brauen interweaves history and culture with her plot and presentation of characters.

We learn of life in pre-occupation Tibet – an insulated, illiterate, hierarchical society, lacking modern means of transportation, but where the people were united by unshakable faith in Buddhism and devotion to Buddhist ideals. We experience Kungsang’s life as a Tibetan nun – involving 100,000 prostrations, 100,000 recitations of a mantra, and 100,000 offerings of the universe mandala - and also her unusual courtship by the Tibetan monk she eventually marries.

We witness the first years of Chinese occupation –destruction, sacrilege, violence, killing, and propaganda: “One after another the soldiers led them [the villagers] up onto the podium and ordered them to exercise ‘self-criticism’. They were supposed to tell their life stories, describing the traditional Tibetan ways as feudal and backwards, and praising everything Chinese as correct, progressive, and promising a bright future.”

We travel with Kungsang and her young daughters on foot across the Himalayas, and live with them in a refugee camp, where they battle illness, living under open tarpaulin shelters in monsoon soon and enduring backbreaking work. But there they also re-unite with friends from the past, and revered Tibetan lamas.

Author Yangzom Brauen is skilled in weaving the texture of Tibetan culture into her narrative – the practice of kora (walking around a sacred place absorbed in prayer), the chod ritual of “cutting through the ego,” sky burial rites, healing practices (“Carry our child four times around the holy lake Basum Tso and she will recover”), the eating of barley-based tsampa, the celebration of Losar, the Tibetan New Year, and dedication to building “good karma” through selfless action.

In the second half of the narrative, when Sonam marries a young Swiss man who is a devoted student of Tibetan culture, we experience with her the difficult adaptation to an entirely new lifestyle , for in Switzerland people eat with utensils, buy processed food, wash frequently, and show little respect for the dignity of the dying. Each of the three women must find her own balance between her Tibetan heritage and western life. Finally, the author tells her own story - as a Swiss-American who becomes an actress and an activist in the Free Tibet movement, and who honors the lives of her mother and grandmother by writing this book.

Across Many Mountains is a treasure, a must-read because its portrayal of Tibetan female refugees and Tibetan culture in the wake of Chinese occupation, and because of the literary skills with which Yangzom Braun narrates the lives of her family. I highly recommend it.
NiceOne
What a great read! I've never had a good understanding of "The Tibet Issue" and found this book really helpful. It gave me that background I needed about Tibet and China, in a very enjoyable format. Reading the personal stories of those experiencing it is, for me, a good way to learn more history. Of course I have to keep in mind that I am hearing only the perspective of these particular individuals. Three generations of Tibetan women tell their story and within this one family of course there are very different experiences. Thus we get both the beginning of the story as well as updates and current issues, from the Chinese invasion through the family fleeing to India, to intermarriage with other cultures and ethnic groups. We learn about not only what it is like to be a refugee, but what it is like to be the mother of a refugee.

I especially appreciated that the author addressed the problem of what to do TODAY, when many Chinese people have lived their whole lives in Tibet, as Tibet has been occupied 60 years. This is now their home also and they are not moving anymore than I, an American whose family came here in the 17th century, am moving back to Ireland/England/Scotland/France. The author does briefly talk about other ways that Tibetans can regain some autonomy, which I found hopeful.

I also found interesting some descriptions of how this family experienced Buddhism, which is very different from the Buddhism that I have seen practiced in the U.S. I find cultural effects on religion intriguing, and often annoying, so was glad to increase my understanding.

This book is rich in the details of daily life and experiences of refugees, as well as the adjustment to a new culture. Recommended to anyone interested in other cultures, the life experiences of women, or world history.

You WILL need to look elsewhere for a Chinese perspective, which I believe I will find in my next read [Waiting for the Dalai Lama].
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