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eBook Miscarriages of Justice: Famous London Cases epub

by John J. Eddleston

eBook Miscarriages of Justice: Famous London Cases epub
  • ISBN: 1845630963
  • Author: John J. Eddleston
  • Genre: Biographies
  • Subcategory: True Crime
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: Wharncliffe (November 19, 2009)
  • Pages: 160 pages
  • ePUB size: 1331 kb
  • FB2 size 1835 kb
  • Formats docx lrf mobi azw


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Miscarriages of Justice book.

In these cases, it is impossible not to question some of the evidence, the theories, and the convictions.

This is a list of miscarriage of justice cases

This is a list of miscarriage of justice cases. This list is not exhaustive. Crime descriptions with an asterisk indicate that the events were later determined not to be criminal acts.

book by John J. Eddleston.

The stories involve the eventual execution by hanging of nine men and one woman. To date, two of those men have been reprieved; too late for them and their families of course but, nevertheless, the state had admitted that it was wrong.

Some of these cases are shocking and enlighten any reader as to why there are still issues with miscarriages of justice, both politically and legally.

Miscarriages of Justice: Famous London Cases . .by John J. Eddleston Paperback. Vintage Paperback Paperback Books. Justice League American Comics Novels. Justice Denied by J. A. Jance - NEW - (Paperback, 2008). Green Tea, and Mr. Justice Harbottle by J. Sheridan Le Fanu (Paperback, 2007). £. 9 postage by John J. Young Justice American Comics Novels.

Электронная книга "Criminal Women: Famous London Cases", John J. Eddleston

Электронная книга "Criminal Women: Famous London Cases", John J. Эту книгу можно прочитать в Google Play Книгах на компьютере, а также на устройствах Android и iOS. Выделяйте текст, добавляйте закладки и делайте заметки, скачав книгу "Criminal Women: Famous London Cases" для чтения в офлайн-режиме.

The body of literature about miscarriages of justice is enormous, so for this list .

The body of literature about miscarriages of justice is enormous, so for this list I’ve chosen a mix of fiction and nonfiction that has impacted me personally, both as a novelist and as a crime reporter. Donald Trump and the Central Park Five: the racially charged rise of a demagogue. Burns examines how this high-profile case was so badly bungled, taking on police, prosecutors, the media and politicians in this fearless, infuriating book. I love this book for its scope – it is a grand and thrilling adventure – but also for its implicit warning: defining your life by the worst thing in it comes at a cost.

To face a trial for murder must be a terrifying prospect, all the more so when you know that you are innocent of the charge. How much more horrific must it be then, when you know that should you be found guilty, the sentence must be that you will lose your life at the end of a rope? All of the cases reviewed in this book involved one or more individuals who were put on trial for taking the life of a fellow human being. The stories involve the eventual execution by hanging of nine men and one woman. To date, two of those men have been reprieved; too late for them and their families of course but, nevertheless, the state had admitted that it was wrong. What of the others? What of Louisa Masset, the first person to be hanged in the twentieth century? Did she really murder the son she apparently loved so much? What of Frederick Seddon who went to the gallows still protesting that he was innocent of the murder of his lodger? And what of Harry Armstrong, hanged for murdering his fiancée on New Year's Day 1939? The cases in this book all took place in London. Read the stories for yourself and remember that the law states that if there is a reasonable doubt, then it is the jury's duty to acquit. Was there not a reasonable doubt in some of the cases detailed here? Put yourself onto those juries and decide whether you would have still been prepared to stand in court and announce that dreaded word: 'Guilty!'
Comments: (2)
greatest
The application of the word "famous" to various old criminal cases must be subjective. There were those which were not just famous but infamous and will always remain so in spite of the passage of time. Others, however, only remained notable during living memory. Whilst all the trials and verdicts described in this book were undoubtedly renowned at the time, it is fair to say that several are now long-forgotten. Nevertheless, each selected crime is exciting and offers considerable intrigue.

In selecting nine cases (I do so hate odd numbers - ten would have been much better!) from as early as 1899 to as late as 1972 from the law courts of London, author John Eddleston begins by describing each crime and the subsequent trial in sufficient detail. He includes all relevant evidence, testimony, witness accounts, judges comments and even the press coverage of the day. He then exercises a fair degree of personal judgement in analysing each segment of the story, the motives and whatever else occurred before finally concluding with his own views.

The results are quite extraordinary and make for fascinating reading. In one instance, for example, Eddleston recounts the story of Timothy Evans who was hanged for murder and later granted a posthumous pardon. Having explained what actually happened, the author then argues with considerable reasoning that Evans was not only very probably guilty of the crime in question and, therefore, pardoned for the wrong reasons but, although guilty, still deserved that pardon in any event. Confusing? Not at all, simply well written.

The content is supported, where possible, with an interesting selection of photographs and other documents from National Archives. Apart from all those with an interest in the overall subject matter, this book should prove to be extremely popular with those who are fond of short-stories.

NM
Aloo
If you have read Eddleston's other books on capital crimes in 20th-century Britain -- in particular his Encyclopaedia of Executions, you're not missing much here. Mainly I read the book to see why Eddleston thought Louisa Masset, whom I wrote about on a death penalty blog, was the victim of a miscarriage of justice. The evidence seemed pretty convincing to me.

In this book Eddleston just briefly summarizes each of the nine cases, using the same material as in his other books, then adds a few paragraphs of his own opinion that there was reasonable doubt, or the defendant wasn't mentally competent to be executed, etc. It's a good read if you want to hear a bit about some of the more ambiguous cases in recent history, but there's really very little here that wasn't in the other books he wrote before.
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