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eBook Everything but the Coffee: Learning about America from Starbucks epub

by Bryant Simon

eBook Everything but the Coffee: Learning about America from Starbucks epub
  • ISBN: 0520269926
  • Author: Bryant Simon
  • Genre: Business
  • Subcategory: Biography & History
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: University of California Press (February 9, 2011)
  • Pages: 320 pages
  • ePUB size: 1477 kb
  • FB2 size 1428 kb
  • Formats txt azw docx mbr


Bryant Simon, the author of "Boardwalk of Dreams: Atlantic City and the Fate of Urban America," has written another compelling book about a once beloved, now declining, American institution in "Everything But the Coffee: Learning About America from Starbucks

Bryant Simon, the author of "Boardwalk of Dreams: Atlantic City and the Fate of Urban America," has written another compelling book about a once beloved, now declining, American institution in "Everything But the Coffee: Learning About America from Starbucks. From its inception in the early 1970s to today, Simon traces the rise and fall of Starbucks, not only as a company and business venture, but also as a piece of Americana.

Everything but the Coffee - Bryant Simon. Learning about America from Starbucks. Everything but the Coffee. University of California Press, one of the most distinguished university presses in the United States, enriches lives around the world by advancing scholarship in the humanities, social sciences, and natural sciences. Its activities are supported by the UC Press Foundation and by philanthropic contributions from individuals and institutions.

Everything but the Coffee book. Bryant Simon visited hundreds of Starbucks around the world to ask, Why did Starbucks take hold so quickly with consumers? What did it seem to provide over and above a Everything but the Coffee casts a fresh eye on the world's most famous coffee company, looking beyond baristas, movie cameos, and Paul McCartney CDs to understand what Starbucks can tell us about America. Bryant Simon visited hundreds of Starbucks around the world to ask, Why did Starbucks take hold so quickly with consumers?

Everything but the Coffee casts a fresh eye on the world's most famous coffee company, looking beyond baristas .

Everything but the Coffee casts a fresh eye on the world's most famous coffee company, looking beyond baristas, movie cameos, and Paul McCartney CDs to understand what Starbucks can tell us about America.

Everything but the Coffee This Page Left Intentionally Blank Everything . And not my mom and dad, Bob and Susan Simon.

Everything but the Coffee This Page Left Intentionally Blank Everything but the Coffee Learning about America from. It is hard to explain, and even harder to understand, just how true and steadfast they are in their love. For me, this book had a soundtrack, the music that played in my head and out of my computer as I wrote. That expansiveness, as this books shows, explains why the coffee was worth it. For a fifteen-year stretch from 1992, when the company first went public, to 2007, when its profits started to flag for the first time, Starbucks delivered much more than a stiff shot of caffeine.

Simon's book is a fascinating, sometimes dispiriting look at how Starbucks is emblematic of some deeper . Simon knows more about Starbucks-and about why so many Americans find perfection in their lattes-than anyone.

Simon's book is a fascinating, sometimes dispiriting look at how Starbucks is emblematic of some deeper socioeconomic phenomena at work in this country over the past decade and a half. -Mike Miliard"Boston Phoenix" (12/09/2009). Those who frequent Starbucks will enjoy Simon's range of topics, from business matters to the music played to the (very American) concept of 'self-gifting. "-Publishers Weekly (12/07/2009). He connects our deepest desires to be good, smart, ethical consumers with our equally strong yearning to consume in an authentic way.

Bryant Simon, Professor of History and Director of American Studies at Temple University, knows Starbucks

Bryant Simon, Professor of History and Director of American Studies at Temple University, knows Starbucks. He gathered his "data" while spending fifteen hours a week, for about nine months, in Starbucks. All told, he spent about 500 hours observing Starbucks and those who frequent its "coffee houses. Mostly he seemed to sit and watch, but he often talked with the people he met.

Everything but the coffee : learning about America from Starbucks, Bryant Simon. FROM THE AUTHOR: When I began in the coffee business fourteen years ago, I read every book I could.

Everything but the coffee : learning about America from Starbucks, Bryant Simon 'Coffee Table' Book (PDF). 26 MB·2,295 Downloads. Start and Run a Sandwich and Coffee Shop (Small Business Start Ups). 05 MB·1,422 Downloads·New!

Everything but the Coffee casts a fresh eye on the world's most famous coffee company, looking beyond baristas, movie cameos, and Paul McCartney CDs to understand what Starbucks can tell us about America. Bryant Simon visited hundreds of Starbucks around the world to ask, Why did Starbucks take hold so quickly with consumers? What did it seem to provide over and above a decent cup of coffee? Why at the moment of Starbucks' profit-generating peak did the company lose its way, leaving observers baffled about how it might regain its customers and its cultural significance? Everything but the Coffee probes the company's psychological, emotional, political, and sociological power to discover how Starbucks' explosive success and rapid deflation exemplify American culture at this historical moment. Most importantly, it shows that Starbucks speaks to a deeply felt American need for predictability and class standing, community and authenticity, revealing that Starbucks' appeal lies not in the product it sells but in the easily consumed identity it offers.
Comments: (7)
Majin
Informative and interesting, but a little clinical
Marige
Whether you're a Starbucks junkie or a Starbucks hater, this book lends an excellent insight into one of the world's largest and fastest growing companies. The author discusses everything from Starbucks' ethics, consumption, to sociological role of the company in simple "plain English" that everyone can learn from. An excellent read for anyone interested in the state of modern corporations, environmental sustainability, and how you can help change how things are run.
Velellan
Awesome book! Capitalism FTW! MURICA!
Heri
I wanted to like this book, I really did. But I felt that it was just one big, long bash of Starbucks. Over and over again, the author made his point. Too bad, as I had really hoped that at some point it would move beyond the bashing and brought something positive to the text.
Thetalas
Met the author several years ago. Great book! Just bought another copy for my brother!
Kanal
insightful, inspiring and well written book. I will read it twice later. also a lively case study for business school.
Thabel
Synaposis of what theory is being explained is at from what the expectations of the reader....Disappointment of a read
Thanks
Bryant Simon, the author of "Boardwalk of Dreams: Atlantic City and the Fate of Urban America," has written another compelling book about a once beloved, now declining, American institution in "Everything But the Coffee: Learning About America from Starbucks." From its inception in the early 1970s to today, Simon traces the rise and fall of Starbucks, not only as a company and business venture, but also as a piece of Americana.

Simon, a Professor of History at Temple University, defines what he calls "the Starbucks moment," where in a short period of time, Starbucks exploded and was literally everywhere. However, as he points out, as quickly as Starbucks arrived and became the talk of the business community and Wall Street, the company began to fade and lose its luster. He describes how Starbucks sought people of status and wealth to tout its name and logo and then how it used those high end customers to draw in the middle class. It was the middle class customers buying high priced coffees and lattes that allowed Starbucks its meteoric rise and swollen stock price.

Starbucks, says Simon, convinced a whole group of people that they could abdicate their responsibilities for environmentalism, human rights, poor peasant farmers, and an array of other causes to a large corporation simply by paying more for its products. Yet despite the company's advertising - or is it propaganda? - Simon shows that very little of what Starbucks claims is reality. One example he sites is the environmental issue of recycling. Clearly, using ceramic cups that can be washed is more environmentally sound than using paper cups that go into a landfill. Simon opines that rather than providing reusable cups for its customers, Starbucks continues to use paper cups (the inside is coated with a polyethylene plastic) so that its logo can continue to be seen. After all, if a customer has a paper cup, he or she is more inclined to leave the coffee shop with cup in hand to become a walking advertisement. In an amusing story, he recalls going into a Starbucks and asking for a mug because he was going to drink his coffee on site. Bedlam ensued as the staff searched for a ceramic mug. Just as he was about to give up and settle for a paper cup, an employee shouted "I found it!" "It" was the only ceramic, or reusable, cup in the place.

In other chapters, Simon talks about Starbucks role as a "Third Place," which is a term used to describe somewhere outside the home or workplace where people meet. Starbucks' ventures into music and books and its impact on globalization and fair-trade coffee are some other topics covered.

As the author states in the Afterword, "Everything but the Coffee" was not intended to be a hatchet job on Starbucks. "I defended Starbucks against what I saw then...as knee-jerk attacks against bigness...." However, after getting into his research, "...I stopped seeing the company as an engine of community. Instead, I saw it as a mythmaker offering only an illusion of belonging...." What the reader will find is a well-written, well-researched work that will be an eye opening experience for those who have loved or hated Starbucks. Eric Schlosser's "Fast food Nation" opened the first decade of the 21st Century with an expose of McDonalds and the fast food industry. Bryant Simon ends the decade with a dissection of Starbucks and the abdication of consumer responsibility.
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