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eBook Billion Dollar Lessons: What You Can Learn from the Most Inexcusable Business Failures of the Last Twenty-five Years epub

by Paul B. Carroll,Jim Bond,Chunka Mui

eBook Billion Dollar Lessons: What You Can Learn from the Most Inexcusable Business Failures of the Last Twenty-five Years epub
  • ISBN: 1423370813
  • Author: Paul B. Carroll,Jim Bond,Chunka Mui
  • Genre: Business
  • Subcategory: Biography & History
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: Brilliance Audio; Library edition (September 11, 2008)
  • ePUB size: 1102 kb
  • FB2 size 1165 kb
  • Formats mobi azw rtf lit


The authors investigated 2500 failures for more than two years to form the basis for this book. They relate these stories in a very readable and absorbing manner, analyze them from various aspects and bring out learnable lessons

The authors investigated 2500 failures for more than two years to form the basis for this book. They relate these stories in a very readable and absorbing manner, analyze them from various aspects and bring out learnable lessons. The first lesson learnt is that "it is not enough to just try to be more aware of potential pitfalls. Some outside mechanism needs to be applied as a safeguard to head off bad deals and bad strategies". What can this "outside mechanism" be? Proper Corporate Governance probably.

Billion-Dollar Lessons book. There are thousands of books about successful companies but virtually none about the lessons to be learned from those that crash and burn. Lesson One: The Cold Hard Facts. Between 1981 and 2006, 423 major publicly held .

Электронная книга "Billion Dollar Lessons: What You Can Learn from the Most Inexcusable Business Failures of the Last 25 Ye ars", Paul B. Carroll, Chunka Mui. Эту книгу можно прочитать в Google Play Книгах на компьютере, а также на устройст. Эту книгу можно прочитать в Google Play Книгах на компьютере, а также на устройствах Android и iOS. Выделяйте текст, добавляйте закладки и делайте заметки, скачав книгу "Billion Dollar Lessons: What You Can Learn from the Most Inexcusable Business Failures of the Last 25 Ye ars" для чтения в офлайн-режиме.

Think of Billion Dollar Lessons as the flip side of Good to Great, but just as eye opening and essential as that business classic.

There are thousands of books about successful companies, but virtually none about the lessons to be learned from those that crash and burn. Think of Billion Dollar Lessons as the flip side of Good to Great, but just as eye opening and essential as that business classic. Billion Dollar Lessons will keep you from going from good to gone.

Author Bio. ▼▲. Paul B. Carroll wrote for The Wall Street Journal for seventeen years. The author of Big Blues,/I, he founded Context, the first "new economy" magazine, in 1997. Now a freelance writer, he lives outside Sacramento, California. Chunka Mui is the coauthor of the major business bestseller Unleashing the Killer App and a fellow at Diamond Management and Technology Consultants

The Penguin Group (2008)}, author {Afie M. Badawy}, journal {Journal of Engineering and Technology Management}, year {2009}, volume {26}, pages {211-214} }.

The Penguin Group (2008)}, author {Afie M. Afie M. Badawy.

There are thousands of books about successful companies but virtually none about the lessons to be learned from those that crash and burn. Скачать с помощью Mediaget.

Billion-dollar Lessons by Chunka Mui 9781591842897 (Paperback, 2009) Delivery UK delivery is usually within 10 to 12 working days. Read full description. See details and exclusions. Billion Dollar Lessons: What You Can Learn from the Most Inexcusable Business Failures of the Last 25 Years by Paul B. Carroll, Chunka Mui (Paperback, 2009). Brand new: lowest price.

Chunka Mui follows Unleashing the Killer App with Billion Dollar Lessons. Who knew? Mui and Carroll write that, after World War I, more than 75 percent of . Air Mail pilots died in crashes on the job. Published on: Sep 1, 2008. More from Inc. Sponsored Business Content.

In Billion Dollar Lessons Chunka Mui and Paul Carroll look at the flip side of Jim . I enjoyed reading Billion Dollar Lessons.

In Billion Dollar Lessons Chunka Mui and Paul Carroll look at the flip side of Jim Collin's study of successful companies (Good to Great) and how they got there. In this book, Mui and Carroll take a pointed look at corporate failure. Billion Dollar Lessons - one of the most important books ever written on business strategy. com User, October 6, 2008. Many business books read like school texts, but these authors connect with each example and the story to easily teach each lesson.

“This book is your chance to learn from others’ mistakes.” ―Entrepreneur


In the 1960s, IBM CEO Tom Watson called an executive into his office after his venture lost $10 million. The man assumed he was being fired. Watson told him, “Fired? Hell, I spent $10 million educating you. I just want to be sure you learned the right lessons.”


There are thousands of books about successful companies but virtually none about the lessons to be learned from those that crash and burn. Now Paul Carroll and Chunka Mui draw on research into more than 750 flameouts to reveal the seven biggest reasons for business failure.


Comments: (7)
Tojahn
Wow. As a small business owner I learned a great lesson from the BIG guys. Acquisitions, mergers or takeovers fail well North of 70%. As someone who had in his business plan to buy out a competitor, I'm seriously thinking twice and doing 3x the due dillengence than I thought I needed.

If you are an aggressive small to medium business owner spend a week reading this book if only to see how people over pay for a business only to lose billions on the back end because of reasons seen and unseen.

Company culture, IT systems, fake accounting all the into this theme. Again, read this book if only to second guess yourself if you are thinking about buying out another company. Eye Opener!
Doukasa
This is an excellent detailed analysis of major business failures and how to avoid them. Every person involved in business of any kind must read this book to learn from the billion dollar mistakes of those who came before them.
Maximilianishe
This book is very smart. Frankly, the majority of the book is dedicated to failures. The reason why this book is smart is because few are drawn to stories of failure. This book's readership -- executives, business owners and those thinking about those roles -- would rather hear of success. The sad truth, however, is that wisdom does not reside in snapshot stories of success. My bookshelves contain stories of Enron and WorldCom as exemplars of success. Wisdom is not found there, but rather in the analyses of failures. That outcome is final. And that's part of what the authors are trying to get across -- things change. The stories of companies who did not make it contain lessons of how they overlooked the context where possibilities of change and structural weakness lived. The hopeful part of this book is in the second part where they offer prescriptions on how to overcome the flaws that cause failure. I do think many of their suggestions are spot-on. As a matter of fact, I give them a standing ovation for promoting the use of a devil's advocate, deciding first how to decide and constructing alarm systems. But, some areas of leading an organization are just so hard to pin down. For instance, they reveal that it is a human tendency to rely on stories and myth over more concrete -- and accurate -- evidence. Yet, they say to "find history that fits" when evaluating strategy. And later they say "focus on the strategy, not the process that produced it." I suggest that it is very hard for a leader to discern between what is a story that will misguide and what is a story that will inform. Nonetheless, this book is an enjoyable and worthwhile read.
Arashitilar
The delivery of spectacular failures is the subject of this book. Whereas most management texts deal with success stories and how to be successful, this book relates stories of failures and advises how not to fail while making management decisions. The authors investigated 2500 failures for more than two years to form the basis for this book. They relate these stories in a very readable and absorbing manner, analyze them from various aspects and bring out learnable lessons.
The first lesson learnt is that "it is not enough to just try to be more aware of potential pitfalls. Some outside mechanism needs to be applied as a safeguard to head off bad deals and bad strategies". What can this "outside mechanism" be? Proper Corporate Governance probably.

Another lesson learnt is that "it is awfully hard to kill dangerous ideas when the need for earnings (and bonuses) is very real and short term while the potential problems are ephemeral or long-term". This is often because "once a strategy starts to build momentum it will steamroll any possible objections".

A very valid fact brought out by the authors is that "boards can spot problems, but directors are sometimes reluctant to speak up because they don't have as much information as the CEO and seldom have as much background in the industry". They have also quoted case where directors were "outmaneuvered". Is having more knowledgeable and assertive directors the answer?
The authors suggest that "failures tended to be associated with one of seven types of strategy. Failures could certainly happen for other reasons, but if a company followed one of these seven strategies it was far more likely to flop". These seven strategies are synergy, financial engineering, rollups, staying the course, adjacencies, riding technology and consolidation.
"Part One" of the book is divided into chapters to deal with these seven strategies respectively.
The authors quote a study that found that in 124 mergers only 30 percent generated synergies and even these were "even close to what the acquirer had predicted". The reason that they write for the failures in synergy is "that as companies are becoming more dependent on technology, achieving synergy targets is heavily dependent on the combined entity's ability to integrate their business platform and operate as one", but "the awareness of business platform integration issues is typically missing at all stages of planning".

About "financial engineering" the authors write that "companies get sucked into the idea that they'll indulge in some creative accounting, but only briefly ... but the one or two quarters of aggressive accounting can become ... a way of life - until disaster strikes".
Rollup, as defined by the authors, is the concept that "you can operate more efficiently by taking dozens, or even thousands of small businesses and combining them into one large one". The quote studies that suggest that "more than two-thirds of rollups fail to create any value for investors", but the "problem is not the concept but the execution".
The authors say that executives, like pilots of a crashing aircraft, have warning signs that they are about to crash, but they do it anyway. They relate the interesting story of Kodak in this regard in detail.

Expanding into adjacent markets has been a popular strategy for growth, but the authors find that a majority of such moves fail and that the problem lies mainly in the defining an "adjacent" market.

A very interesting quote from this book is that "marketing is when you lie to your customers, marketing research research is when you lie to yourself". This assertion is supported by the interesting story of Iridium.

The lesson that the authors teach regarding consolidation is that "simply because an industry will consolidate, it does not mean that you should be the buyer" to win. Examples quoted in the book do prove this advice.

The chapter titled "The Devil's Advocate" is very interesting. The authors advise the dissent should be institutionalized to ensure rational decision-making.

This is a very interesting and absorbing book and is recommended to middle and senior levels of management and to directors of companies.
Nightscar
I enjoyed reading this book about companies that went bankrupt. I bought this book to learn more about the Kmart Corporation for a book I was writing. I learned a lot from reading this book. It is full of interesting information about many corporations that went through bankruptcy. A must read for anyone who is doing research in this area. The book is also a good read for business owners who want to learn what NOT to do and how to avoid bankruptcy in these difficult economic times.
Steel balls
If you are thinking about a merger, buyout, consolidation, roll-up or any of the cute names that corporate takeovers go by, read this first. While there are several examples of successful buyouts, this book contains a number examples of disasters.

The stories are well told without being preachy. The research is good, and while I might want more in depth information, for the average corporate exec, the level of detail works.

The part that sets this book apart is that it offers some great coaching questions should you be considering a buyout.

A solid read, and one with a number of takeaways.
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