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eBook Not Just A Living: The Complete Guide To Creating A Business That Gives You A Life epub

by Mark Henricks

eBook Not Just A Living: The Complete Guide To Creating A Business That Gives You A Life epub
  • ISBN: 0738208124
  • Author: Mark Henricks
  • Genre: Business
  • Subcategory: Business Culture
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: Basic Books (July 2003)
  • Pages: 248 pages
  • ePUB size: 1116 kb
  • FB2 size 1409 kb
  • Formats mbr lrf lit docx


Not Just A Living book.

Not Just A Living book. Details (if other): Cancel. Thanks for telling us about the problem. Not Just A Living: The Complete Guide To Creating A Business That Gives You A Life.

Mark Henricks is a regular columnist for Entrepreneur Magazine and American Way, and a frequent . Nevertheless, the book is worth the read if this is a new concept to you. Funding an enjoyable lifestyle is a very much needed idea in today's world of overdoing-work and burning-out cycles.

Mark Henricks is a regular columnist for Entrepreneur Magazine and American Way, and a frequent contributor to the Wall Street Journal, the New York Times, Men's Health, National Geographic World, and a wide variety of other business, technology, investment, and general-interest publications. A full-time free-lance writer, he is the author of several books for entrepreneurs. He lives with his family in Austin, Texas. The author has done our culture a great service in bringing clarity to these ideas.

In Not Just a Living, Mark Henricks explores the genesis of this cultural and social phenomenon and offers a comprehensive approach for assessing your own potential, taking the plunge, and building a business that helps you fulfill both personal and professional. ISBN13:9780738208121.

Not Just a Living: The Complete Guide to Creating a Business That Gives You a Life.

Mark has written books including, Not Just A Living: The Complete Guide to Creating a Business . Mark Henricks has reported on personal finance, investing, retirement, entrepreneurship and other topics for more than 30 years. His freelance byline has appeared on CNBC

Mark has written books including, Not Just A Living: The Complete Guide to Creating a Business That Gives You A Life. A graduate of the University of Texas journalism program, he lives in Austin, Texas. His freelance byline has appeared on CNBC. com and in The Wall Street Journal, The New York Times, The Washington Post, Kiplinger’s Personal Finance and other leading publications.

Reflections Of A ManReflections Of A Man is a book designed for both men .

Reflections Of A ManReflections Of A Man is a book designed for both men and women to enhance the q. .

Mark Henricks is a regular columnist for Entrepreneur magazine and .

Mark Henricks is a regular columnist for Entrepreneur magazine and StartUpJournal. com and a contributor to The Wall Street Journal, The New York Times, Men’s Health, National Geographic World, American Way, and a variety of other business, technology, investment, and general-interest publications. A full-time freelance writer, he is the author of several books for entrepreneurs, including Not Just A Living: The Complete Guide To Creating A Business That Gives You A Life (Perseus Books, August 2002). Similar Posts: How to Turn from a Hobbyist to a Business Owner.

Mark Henricks reports on finance, business, technology and other topics from Austin, Texas. He is the author of Not Just A Living: The Complete Guide to Creating a Business that Gives You A Life and other books. Visit him online or on Twitter henricks.

Use this question to guide what kind of business you want to start But keep in mind, it takes a village to create a product

Use this question to guide what kind of business you want to start. If you want extra money, maybe you should start a side hustle. But keep in mind, it takes a village to create a product. If you want to make an app and you're not an engineer, you will need to reach out to a technical person. Or if you need to mass-produce an item, you will have to team up with a manufacturer. Here is a seven-step checklist - including finding a manufacturer and pricing strategies - you can use for your own product development.

As people have come to yearn for more fulfilling and creative work, many are realizing their dreams by leaving the corporate life behind and creating businesses around the things they love. In Not Just a Living, Mark Henricks explores the genesis of this cultural and social phenomenon and offers a comprehensive approach for assessing your own potential, taking the plunge, and building a business that helps you fulfill both personal and professional aspirations. Combining the authority of firsthand experience, colorful and engaging stories from the front lines, and a variety of diagnostic and planning tools, Henricks shows you how to determine whether the entrepreneurial route is right for you, recognize opportunities, overcome obstacles, plan your course, and launch and sustain your business-whether it's a solo venture out of your garage or a multi-million-dollar enterprise.
Comments: (7)
monotronik
I really liked the introduction of the concept of a "lifestyle entrepreneur." Too many times, people go into business to get more control, more balance in their lives, and wind up creating environments for themselves that give them far less of each. Making the conscious choice to have a lifestyle is an excellent point of discussion.

Unfortunately I think the book actually seeks to be far too comprehensive in the mechanics of starting and operating a business. In the process, the treatment of these areas is superficial and feels off track.

There is plenty of literature on the mechanics of business, and some commentary on the distinct tack a lifestyle entrepreneur would have to take is definitely needed. The unique aspects required - keeping operating costs low, work to profit ratio high - are good areas to cover, but the book attempts to introduce basic business concepts where only aspects applicable to this lifestyle may be needed.

Overall, the book was a good read - definitely more supportive than science. But, that's okay. I think this book should be supportive, discussion oriented, inspirational, and I felt it should have had more of that. The attempt at being mathematical, business tutorial-ish felt like it really didn't fit. Instead pointing to some basic resources on this - such as the Appendix does - with maybe a chapter on the seriousness of staying on task in business operation (still discussion oriented) may have done the trick. (Because in the end the only way you'll remain supporting your lifestyle is to cover costs and meet personal expenses.)

A discussion (along the lines of Barbara Sher) where it just may be many small things that you do - many services you provide - could enhance the usability for active minds that don't settle on one thing to do.

Nevertheless, the book is worth the read if this is a new concept to you. Funding an enjoyable lifestyle is a very much needed idea in today's world of overdoing-work and burning-out cycles. The author has done our culture a great service in bringing clarity to these ideas.
Negal
As I read this book, I was reminded of Socrates' observation that "the unexamined life is not worth living" and of Thoreau's assertion that many people "live lives of quiet desperation." If either or both describes your current situation, Hendricks offers information and counsel which can be of incalculable value to you. The origin of the word "entrepreneur" is a late-19th century French word meaning "one who undertakes." Today, we think of entrepreneurs as those who undertake risks. Obviously, a decision to leave a "job" to seek opportunities elsewhere can be perilous. It should also be noted that many of those who are self-employed are miserably unhappy, and, that many of those within an organization are enthusiastic, indeed passionate about their "job." Henricks makes a critically important distinction between standard of living and quality of life. Moreover, the latter refers to both personal and career issues. He provides rock-solid advice, anchored in a wealth of his own real-world experiences. obviously, he is a thoughtful and caring person. His counsel is practical, expressed with no-nonsense eloquence.
The questions Henricks poses, in my opinion, are far more important than any of the answers he provides. Years ago, Rod Steiger was asked if young people sought out his advice. "Oh yeah, sure, all the time. And I always ask them the same question: 'Do you want to be an actor or do you [in italics] have to be an actor?' The longer it takes them to answer that question, the less likely they'll ever make it." Not everyone feels compelled to create a business. Fair enough. But surely everyone can "undertake" to obtain more than a paycheck for their labors; to take prudent risks; in Tennyson's words, "to strive, to seek, to find" a higher, more fulfilling quality of life. How easy it is to become hostage to what Jim O'Toole characterizes as the "ideology of comfort and the tyranny of custom." Henricks urges his reader to free herself or himself from such confinement. It is no coincidence that, year after year, the most highly admired companies (e.g. Southwest Airlines) are also the most profitable. Each has a culture in which the "lifestyle entrepreneur" (Henricks' term) is strongly encouraged, not merely tolerated.
Who will derive the greatest benefit from this book? Those who now live unexamined lives of quiet desperation. Once having read this book, many of them may be unwilling and/or unable to free themselves from the "ideology of comfort and the tyranny of custom." But at least, thanks to Henricks, they will have completed a rigorous process of self-examination. Does he provide a map or a blueprint for personal fulfillment? No. Rather, he provides a mirror and a compass which, for many of his readers, will be of incalculable value.
Kupidon
I thought this was an excellent read on a subject that has gotten little attention, Lifestyle Entrepreneurship.
Part One of the book explains the difference between Lifestyle vs. Classic entrpreneurship and offers an alternative to those wishing to work for themselves, but without having to build a business.
Part's Two and Three covers such topics as getting started, funding, people and technology. For those that have read other entrepreneurial books, these topics have been covered before, but the author gives a concise treatment of each topic.
Finally, what makes this a good read is the author's writing style which is easy to read and concise, as demonstrated by the book length. The book should serve both as a first read on lifestyle entrpreneurship and reference manual to get started.
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