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eBook Learning to Lead: The Art of Transforming Managers Into Leaders (Jossey Bass Business & Management Series) epub

by Jay A. Conger,Edward E. Lawler III,Gretchen M. Spreitzer

eBook Learning to Lead: The Art of Transforming Managers Into Leaders (Jossey Bass Business & Management Series) epub
  • ISBN: 1555424740
  • Author: Jay A. Conger,Edward E. Lawler III,Gretchen M. Spreitzer
  • Genre: Business
  • Subcategory: Business Culture
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: Jossey-Bass; 1st edition (August 14, 1992)
  • Pages: 234 pages
  • ePUB size: 1369 kb
  • FB2 size 1654 kb
  • Formats docx rtf txt lit


I was favorably disposed toward Conger's compelling analysis in "Learning to Lead" before I began reading his book.

I was favorably disposed toward Conger's compelling analysis in "Learning to Lead" before I began reading his book. L to L" is essentially a "connoisseurship study," with Conger himself in the primary role of scholarly bserver.

Using a diary format supported by workshop outlines, sample materials, and interviews with one hundred fellow participants, he assesses the strengths and weaknesses of four key approaches to leadership development: personal growth, conceptual analysis, feedback, and skill development.

Learning to Lead offers human resource professionals, consultants, and executives personal insights into . I was favorably disposed toward Conger's compelling analysis in "Learning to Lead" before I began reading his book.

Learning to Lead offers human resource professionals, consultants, and executives personal insights into the role training plays in leadership development.

Jay A. Conger, Gretchen M. Spreitzer, Edward E. Lawler

Jay A. Lawler. ISBN: 0787943517; A Stunning Achievement in Change Management In October of 1997, the nation's top business theorists and practitioners met at a conference cosponsored by USC's Leadership Institute and the Center for Effective Organizations. The group was challenged topresent their most advanced ideas regarding leadership and change management. This guide is the stunning result of their collective efforts.

Emotional Intelligence Transformational Leader Change Agenda Journal ofApplied Leadership Learn. R. Quinn and N. Snyder, ‘Advanced change theory’, in . These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves. Lawler III (eds), Leader’s Change Handbook: An Essential Guide to Setting Direction (San Francisco: Jossey Bass, 1998). CONGER, an internationally known author, speaker, and educator, is. . CONGER, an internationally known author, speaker, and educator, is executive director of the Leadership Institute and a professor of business administration at the Marshall School of Business at the University of Southern California. Business Week has recognized Conger as the nation's best professor of executive leadership. GRETCHEN M. SPREITZER is an assistant professor of business administration at the University of Southern California. She is a recognized expert on empowerment and leadership. He was named by Business Week as one of the country's leading management experts. Bibliographic information. Conger, Edward E. Lawler III, Gretchen M. Spreitzer. A Stunning Achievement in Change Management In October of 1997, the nation's top business theorists and practitioners met at a conference cosponsored by USC's Leadership Institute. A Stunning Achievement in Change Management In October of 1997, the nation's top business theorists and practitioners met at a conference cosponsored by USC's Leadership Institute and the Center for Effective Organizations. The group was challenged to present their most advanced ideas regarding leadership and change management.

71 Conger, Jay and Beth Benjamin (1999). 27 Goleman, Daniel (1996). Building Leaders: How Successful Companies Develop the Next Generation. 71 Covey, Stephen (1990). Principle-Centered Leadership. 8 Covey, Stephen (2004). The 8th Habit: From Effectiveness to Greatness (2000). Emotional Intelligence: Why It Can Matter More Than IQ.

Conceptual Underpinnings of Systematic Strategic Management. Conger, Jay A. Learning to Lead: The Art of Transforming Managers into Leaders. New York: Free Press, 1990. Organizational Dynamics 18 (1990): 19–31. San Francisco: Jossey-Bass, 1992. Constantinople, Anne.

In his recent publication, Learning to Lead: The Art ofTransforming Managers Into Leaders, author Jay Conger .

In his recent publication, Learning to Lead: The Art ofTransforming Managers Into Leaders, author Jay Conger discusses this topic in depth. His intent is to argue that while many leadership qualities are inherent atbirth many others can be developed while even the inherent ones require consistent nurturing. Increased consideration of transforming the predoctoral psychology internship into a postdoctoral training experience has resulted from changes in the training and reimbursement for psychology trainees, concerns about employment of recent graduates, and the perceived limited status of psychology interns within health care settings.

Assume you're seriously interested in figuring our how to evaluate the many different approaches to leadership training. Fortunately, Jay Conger has provided a starting point. --Fortune

Gain an insider's view of some of the most popular leadership development programs offered today. Learning to Lead offers human resource professionals, consultants, and executives personal insights into the role training plays in leadership development.

You'll learn:

The forces that foster leadership Classic approaches to leadership training Different feedback approaches The future of leadership training

Turn your managers into effective leaders!

Comments: (2)
Anarasida
This book really was an analysis of several leader development programs as they existed a decade or so ago. I'm sure it was more helpful then than it is now.

It can be helpful to read a book like this if you are interested in how to assess the value of those types of programs or how to develop them, but it should now be read not for the particulars of those that were covered (they've all changed to a degree, some considerably), but to gain an appreciation for how to approach leader development programs in general.
Flarik
I was favorably disposed toward Conger's compelling analysis in "Learning to Lead" before I began reading his book. I've been thoroughly impressed by his work thru' several articles he's written (one of which synthesizes the highlights of this book-length exposition in a shorter essay form).

"L to L" is essentially a "connoisseurship study," with Conger himself in the primary role of scholarly expert/participant-observer. He writes parts of "L to L" in the first person, as he relates his experiences in several of the most popular leadership training programs available on the market today. But he supplements these more subjective impressions w/ more objective critiques of these programs in light of his more scholarly knowledge re: leadership education, as well. The result is a highly engaging, rewarding reflection that blends the immediacy of a compelling autobiography with the longer view and broader perspective of a savvy social-scientific treatise.

Conger has mastered all the salient leadership literature during his long academic career. He thus knows extremely well the subject(s) he writes about here. Yet he complements this professorial persona in "L to L" with his more human, accessible side, too. His readers are thus treated to a very balanced, nuanced appraisal of the major pros & cons of most of the most popular leadership-training approaches one finds being practiced today.

Conger uses the direct personal experience of training participants (plenty of others that he and his staff have interviewed, as well as his own) to ground the theory that informs his analysis. He understands the premises that undergird the various approaches he writes about, so he is able to illuminate the limitations as well as the inherent potential of each. I understand that Dr. Conger twice rec'd McGill University's Distinguished Teacher Award. It isn't hard to see from reading this volume why he is such an incisive and gifted educator.

Although few of us may still be able to take graduate or undergraduate courses from Conger today, anyone who peruses his "Learning to Lead" will be richly rewarded by his trenchant insights about which combinations of leadership training programs might be most effective--and WHY. I recommend this book MOST ENTHUSIASTICALLY to leadership novices as well as more seasoned educators, trainers, and students in this crucially important and rapidly burgeoning field.
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