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eBook The Enemy of Nature: The End of Capitalism or the End of the World? epub

by Joel Kovel

eBook The Enemy of Nature: The End of Capitalism or the End of the World? epub
  • ISBN: 1552662551
  • Author: Joel Kovel
  • Genre: Business
  • Subcategory: Economics
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: Brunswick Books; 2 edition (October 30, 2007)
  • Pages: 329 pages
  • ePUB size: 1585 kb
  • FB2 size 1544 kb
  • Formats mobi lrf azw docx


Indeed, Kovel points out that up to 20 percent of the world economy already exists in the "informal" sector, although most of this is comprised of criminal activity and much less of the positive kind (such as the Bruderhof communities of the . This latter part of Kovel's analysis bears similarity to Nick Dyer-Witheford's "Cyber-Marx", although Kovel does.

Then it became clear that you couldn't just breeze through this book, you had to go through paragraph by paragraph, and by the middle of the book I almost put it down.

Joel Kovel argues against claims that we can achieve a better environment through the current Western 'way of. .

Joel Kovel argues against claims that we can achieve a better environment through the current Western 'way of being'.

Joel Kovel has written a challenging and compelling book. Both inform this new text, but here the concern is with the development of an eco-socialist perspective on the world and a politics which could give expression to such a viewpoint. Senate in 1998 and for the Presidency in 2000.

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Joel Kovel is Distinguished Professor of Social Studies at Bard College.

The Enemy of Nature is a challenging book, written with passion and eloquence. This master work by Joel Kovel then pursues the necessary implications - including the opportunity and need to imagine an ecological socialist society.

Joel Kovel has served as a professor in Psychiatry, Anthropology, Political Science, Social Studies and Communications. Kovel has developed his distinctive approach, which draws on both psychoanalysis and Marxism, across a wide range of publications. Kovel is also a political activist.

Download Citation On Jan 1, 2002, Joel Kovel and others published The Enemy of Nature: The End of.

The reason behind this attempt at cross-fertilisation is that, if one reads Deleuze’s book on Kant together with that on the time-image in cinema, the parallel between Kant’s revolutionary reconceptualisation of time (against the backdrop of the Aristotelian conception) and Deleuze’s on the time-image in cinema (as opposed to the movement-image ) becomes apparent.

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Comments: (7)
Garr
Joel Kovel's "The Enemy of Nature" offers a powerful and unflinching eco-Marxist critique of the capitalist system. Concluding that the path of accumulation must inevitably lead to a world wide ecological crisis, the author theorizes about the type of "ecosocialist" system that must supplant capitalism in order to ensure humanity's survival.
Kovel is part of a growing "Red/Green" movement that also includes the outstanding Marxist scholar James O'Connor. Kovel's arguments seem to build upon and indeed are closely aligned with many of the ideas in O'Connor's excellent book "Natural Causes," but I personally find Kovel's writing to be a bit more accessible than O'Connor's. Perhaps this pragmatism can be attributed to Kovel's political sensibilities, as he was a candidate for the Green Party Presidential nomination in 2000.
Kovel believes that various forms of so-called "Green economics" are doomed to failure because they do not address what he sees as the root problem driving the ecological crisis: namely, capital's need to continuously expand. He points out that whatever gains might be realized from the introduction of environmentally-friendly technology will be quickly outweighed by the expansion of the economy. For example, fuel cells might be less harmful than internal combustion engines, but if the technology merely enables the manufacture of hundreds of millions of new automobiles, the planet will ultimately be much worse off.
But Kovel acknowledges that the current Green movement is in fact helping to lay the groundwork for what is yet to come. The Green's emphasis on local democratic control of the means of production will help free labor from its bondage with capital, which is essential for socialism to succeed.
Of course, Kovel devotes a section to readers who may need to be reminded that really existing socialism as practiced in the Soviet Union and elsewhere was NOT what Marx intended. Kovel shows that these countries actually substituted the state for the market, in the end merely proving that markets were superior to centralized planning. The ruined environments left behind by the Communist states were testaments to a failed attempt at accumulation, in much the same way that the West is currently degrading the air, land and sea in its ongoing frenzy of accumulation.
Kovel speculates on how collapse might occur in the capitalist nations. He understands that a breakdown of the financial system could easily lead to fascism, or possibly "ecofascism", as capital seeks to hold on to power. But Kovel thinks it may be plausible that the pockets of production growing outside the bounds of capital may be strong enough to resist the counter-revolution. Indeed, Kovel points out that up to 20 percent of the world economy already exists in the "informal" sector, although most of this is comprised of criminal activity and much less of the positive kind (such as the Bruderhof communities of the U.S.).
This latter part of Kovel's analysis bears similarity to Nick Dyer-Witheford's "Cyber-Marx", although Kovel does not appear to be aware of this book nor is it referenced in his bibliography. In short, Dyer-Witheford theorizes that technophiles will appropriate the means of production in order to empower a society that eventually achieves autonomy by existing outside the bounds of capitalist control. Like Kovel, Dyer-Witheford envisions that the post-capitalist society will choose to apply its surplus value to the cause of freeing labor and restoring its ravaged social, physical and natural environments. In my view, the convergence of these two authors' thoughts -- albeit arrived at from different angles, but perhaps more compelling because of this -- bolsters both of their arguments and suggests that the possibility of radical change may not be as elusive as one might suppose.
I strongly recommend Kovel's book for anyone who may be concerned about the future of our society or for those who may be contemplating how a more humane world might come about.
Obong
If you haven't read this you are poorly educated. How bizarre that Dr. Kovel's book comes within a decade of the takeover of America by capitalist billionaires.
Fordrekelv
I completely agree with the political agenda of this book. I am glad it was written. Kovel is RIGHT ON TARGET.
But the book was dreadful to plow/bore through. Talk about OBTUSE VERBIAGE. There is still this awful tradition out there that if you wor dsomething so that it "sounds" brilliant -- it must be. I hate that tradition. We need plain language and simple articulation. This book is just the opposite. Here are but a couple of random examples to give you some idea: "Capital's invasion takes place across an ecosystemic manifold encompassing both culture and nature, with points of commodity formation arising everywhere" (p.55) -- got that? or "If 'entropy' is a logarithmic measure of the probabilistic disorder of a given physical system, the Second Law states that for such a system, whether it be the air in a room, a living body, or the earth as a whole, so long as neither energy nor matter is added to said system -- that is, so long as the system is 'closed' -- then its entropy will rise with time" (p.93) -- got that?
Look, there were many times in this book where I wrote "right on!" in the margins. There were also many times whene I wrote "blah blah blah"...I was going to assign this to my students of social theory -- I teach at a small liberal arts college. No way. Very few people can plow through this dense stuff.
Mr_NiCkNaMe
This is probably the greatest title on ecosocialism out there (side by side with Bellamy Foster's Marx's Ecology). I must really recommend it.
Gamba
I bought and read this book several years ago.
I recall that it was horribly written, even though I am entirely sympathetic with the author's message. The book appeared to be written by a professor who does not know how to express himself simply or clearly.

I give it one star because it is written so poorly. I would like to give it zero stars, but I believe that isn't an option in the Amazon ranking system.

If ecosocialists can't write better than this, we're certainly doomed.
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