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eBook The Employee Handbook of New Work Habits for a Radically Changing World: 13 Ground Rules for Job Success in the Information Age epub

by Price Pritchett

eBook The Employee Handbook of New Work Habits for a Radically Changing World: 13 Ground Rules for Job Success in the Information Age epub
  • ISBN: 0944002153
  • Author: Price Pritchett
  • Genre: Business
  • Subcategory: Management & Leadership
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: Pritchett Publishing Company; 2 edition (January 2, 2012)
  • Pages: 51 pages
  • ePUB size: 1982 kb
  • FB2 size 1215 kb
  • Formats rtf doc lrf txt


This powerful employee handbook provides 13 clear and practical guidelines that workers can weave into their daily .

This powerful employee handbook provides 13 clear and practical guidelines that workers can weave into their daily routines immediately. These specific points are made with hard facts. Could this have anything to do with the lucky number 13? Filled with his "13 Ground Rules for Job Success in the Information Age," Pritchett's book really is a survival manual. In an time of new technologies, services, knowledge work, and fierce worldwide competition, only those open to change-those who are flexible and invest their energy in finding and seizing opportunities-will thrive. Those who resist change and harbor bitterness will only end up going the way of the dinosaurs.

This powerful employee handbook provides 13 clear and practical guidelines that workers can weave into their . This is a softcover manual I picked up from work around 1998

This powerful employee handbook provides 13 clear and practical guidelines that workers can weave into their daily routines immediately. These specific points are made with hard facts, powerful logic and a sense of humor that can be universally understood and applied. This is a softcover manual I picked up from work around 1998. I have briefly read it in the past and never completed it. At only fifty-one pages, it should be less than an hour worth of reading, as the words are in large print. I always looked at it as a "must read" handbook to what would be the future of business and employment for my personal mindset.

Books for People with Print Disabilities. Internet Archive Books. Uploaded by LineK on January 22, 2010. org on February 16, 2010. SIMILAR ITEMS (based on metadata). The Employee Handbook of New Work Habits for a Radically Changing World : 13 Ground Rules for Job Success in the Information Age. by Price Pritchett.

The Employee Handbook of New Work Habits for a Radically Changing World : 13 Ground Rules for Job Success in the Information Age.

By: Pritchett, Price. Description: 51 p. ; 23 c. SBN: 0944002153. Other title: New work habits for a radically changing world. Subject(s): Career development Organizational change Work ethic Adaptability (Psychology)DDC classification: 65. Tags from this library: No tags from this library for this title.

Every textbook comes with a 21-day "Any Reason" guarantee. Published by Pritchett & Hull Associates, Incorporated.

Price Pritchett's little book, The Employee Handbook of New Work . Improving job performance also means building a reputation as a problem solver.

Price Pritchett's little book, The Employee Handbook of New Work Habits For A Radically Changing World, should really be called "The Abridged Career Bible" and not a handbook.

NEW WORK HABITS FOR A RADICALLY CHANGING WORLD, the employee handbook of, 13 ground rules for job success in the information age, by Price Pritchett,printed in1999. This item is a book6" by 9" 51 page softcover copy. This item is in good condition, pages are clean and tight. a21 Powered by eCRATER.

This powerful employee handbook provides 13 clear and practical guidelines that workers can weave into their daily routines immediately. These specific points are made with hard facts, powerful logic and a sense of humor that can be universally understood and applied. And, the handbook format will enable people to transform the organization fast by promoting a consistent message throughout the organization.
Comments: (7)
Virn
Price Pritchett's little book, The Employee Handbook of New Work Habits For A Radically Changing World, should really be called "The Abridged Career Bible" and not a handbook. Could this have anything to do with the lucky number 13? Filled with his "13 Ground Rules for Job Success in the Information Age," Pritchett's book really is a survival manual. In an time of new technologies, services, knowledge work, and fierce worldwide competition, only those open to change-those who are flexible and invest their energy in finding and seizing opportunities-will thrive. Those who resist change and harbor bitterness will only end up going the way of the dinosaurs. And we don't need to be reminded of what eventually happened to the dinosaurs...

Pritchett advises workers to become quick-change artists. In an age of restructuring, outsourcing, downsizing, subcontracting, and forming new alliances, workers can expect new ways of working and having to align immediately with new organizational needs and realities. Being a quick-change artist-mobility-can build an employee's reputation.

Then again, says, Pritchett, so does commitment. Commit fully to your job. Companies now cannot afford to hire more employees to solve common problems. Nevertheless, clients and customers expect quality and speed. Companies' response is to throw fewer people at problems and to do more-faster and better-with less. This calls for highly committed people-those who work from the heart and invest passionately to their jobs. It follows that commitment will result in more satisfying work, too, bringing empowerment, relieving stress, and curing the pain of change.

Through their commitment and working from the heart, employees are contributing and adding value. Workers should think that they are being remunerated for the value they add rather than for their tenure, good intentions or activity level.

Employees' job security, therefore, depends on commitment and how valuable they are to customers. Employees must see themselves as service centers. They need to sharpen their insights into their personal "market" and understand what it is their customers do, expect and need. Employees need to know how they fit into the overall picture and how they will contribute to customers' success. Remember, warns Pritchett: "customer" does not only imply people outside the organization but co-workers and internal customers as well. Career success depends on building strong relationships with both internal and external customers and a reputation for responsiveness and quality service.

Just ensure that service and responses are delivered in a timely fashion! We do, as Pritchett says, live in an impatient world. Organizations, then, must accelerate. Workers must operate with a sense of urgency. These are raw survival instincts at work. To survive: speed up. To be successful, organizations must emphasize action: cover ground quickly, eliminate excess baggage, abandon outmoded practices, decentralize, and delegate decision-making power. There really is no room for slow adjustment to change. Valuable employees are those who push the process of change along.

But change brings ambiguity and uncertainty!

Fine. As Pritchett advises, accept it, and manage your own morale! Workers need to realize that placing their morale in someone else's hands disempowers them and that ambiguity may, in fact, be the in the best interest of their career.

Sure, they will be faced with new expectations, shifting priorities, different reporting relationships, vague job descriptions...

Workers need to act upbeat, accept change, and create clarity for themselves-to set priorities, meet deadlines, chase down needed information, show initiative and an ability to improvise. They need to work as though they are in business for themselves.

So what does that mean?

Traditional hierarchies are flattening out. Organizations want to get closer to customers and clients, and are decentralizing business units. The result? Mini-enterprises or self-contained work groups that operate more independently. Employees will need to assume more responsibility for the success of the entire enterprise and consider personally how they can help cut costs, improve productivity, and innovate.

In other words, as hierarchies collapse, responsibility, power, and authority are being pushed to the lower levels. Self-contained work teams must stand accountable for their collective results. Accountability implies thinking in broad terms, considering the larger picture, and considering outcomes. Workers must streamline their approach to economize time, energy, and other resources.

Broad thinking and innovation take brains: it doesn't take long for skills and knowledge to become outmoded in a rapidly changing world-a world that takes no pity on those who are lazy about learning. Workers need to stay in school in order to retool themselves and to keep up with the latest knowledge. Their future employability depends on up-to-date credentials, the latest skills, and the most recent developments in their chosen field. Home study, reading, attending workshops and seminars, volunteering for understudy or apprenticeship programs, asking for learning opportunities-all of these should become "habits".

Lifelong learning implies continuous improvement. Yes, and according to Pritchett, it's the best insurance for both employees' careers and for organizations. How? It is the relentless quest for a better way, for high quality craftsmanship, for daily perfection. Continuous improvement-and this is not just limited to learning, either-may be gradual, but in the long run, it adds up to a competitive advantage.

Employees also need to learn not to rely solely on their reputation anymore: the world is changing too quickly. Employees must then strive to upgrade their job performance-response time, quality, cost control, and customer service-on an ongoing basis.

Improving job performance also means building a reputation as a problem solver. Employees must learn to take care of problems, not point them out. By searching beyond themselves, for solutions, they disempower themselves and lose the ability to find workable solutions. The pro-active solution, according to Pritchett, is for employees to assume ownership of problems and to allow the solutions to start with them.

To summarize, change is inevitable, and there is little, if anything, organizations can do to stop it. The best they can do is adapt and to alter their expectations-preferably before they have to. Some are fortunate enough to scramble and adjust when push comes to shove. As to the rest? Well, just remember the dinosaurs...

(...)
Kison
After reading this book the first time in 1998, I was caused to reflect on my own career and everyday performance. I realized that times are changing, and I had better be prepared to change with them. Accepting that change happens, regardless of how uncomfortable those changes may be, we MUST embrace the changes. Those that see the changes as an opportunity to provide greater value to those we serve. I am not a business person, I am a Firefighter and changes are happening all around us. We must be ready to embrace the changes, and learn to adapt, or we will not be in the business of protecting our citizens.
Gholbithris
New Work Habits for a Radically Changing World reveals: Why resisting change can ruin your career. The real source of job security. Why you should focus on outcomes rather than effort. The power of recommitment. Why you don't have time to take your time. The risks of relying on your reputation. Why you must contribute more than you cost. Plus, more high powered guidelines on how to take personal responsibility for your career and seize the many opportunities you will encounter in the information age.
Gtonydne
No one would argue the points made are actually bad advice. So why the bad reviews? Well, this is the evil version of “Who Moved My Cheese?” This book is a bully. There’s no rooting for cute mice, no hoping the clueless will eventually catch on, no happy ending (together) in a brand new cheese station. This book communicates one main message: “shut the F*** up and PAY ATTENTION because we are sick of your whining, you morons”. It reminds me of a cartoon someone put anonymously on our bulletin board over the copier….”The Floggings will continue until morale improves!” ~The Management.
Shak
Most managers are going to know this principles but I believe this book makes us 'think' about these principles. If we are not going to follow them as managers and employees, are careers and companies are not going to succeedin the long run. It means we need to think about the basics. This book can be used as a training tool for the manager and his staff to work closer as a 'team'. If you don't work together it will not work.
Fhois
This book had to have been written knowing that managers control purchase of such books, so lets tell them everything they want to hear and make some money. Aside from stating obvious advice such as stay flexible, keep your skills up to date, do a good job and other topics that fall under the rubric of "DUH!", this sparsely worded pocketbook proceeds to absolve managment of their duties by shifting them to the employees they manage. In between randomly quoted computer industry statistics that serve no purpose whatsoever other than filler amongst pages starving for content, Price places all responsibility on the worker bees, leaving the managers free to kick back and read more stupid books like this one. Amongst his pearls of wisdom doled out to the troops are "Work like you own the company" and "You are responsible for your own motivation". Need I say more?
Arthunter
I read this in the 80's, when I was just starting out in my career. Much of my success in business can be traced to the lessons that it teaches. Starting out, I thought of my job as a job. I showed up, did what I was asked, but wasn't really engaged. After reading "New Work Habits...", I became invested -- in my career, but mostly in myself -- and have reaped the rewards in recognition, compensation, satisfaction, and flexibility.

Basically, this little book teaches you how to make yourself valuable to employers. Its principles are timeless and true. I am buying copies to give to my daughter, nieces and nephews who are all young adults starting out in their own careers.

Highly recommended.
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