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eBook MarketPsych: How to Manage Fear and Build Your Investor Identity epub

by Richard L. Peterson

eBook MarketPsych: How to Manage Fear and Build Your Investor Identity epub
  • ISBN: 0470543582
  • Author: Richard L. Peterson
  • Genre: Business
  • Subcategory: Marketing & Sales
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: Wiley; 1 edition (September 8, 2010)
  • Pages: 240 pages
  • ePUB size: 1440 kb
  • FB2 size 1177 kb
  • Formats lrf lit mobi doc


Электронная книга "MarketPsych: How to Manage Fear and Build Your Investor Identity", Richard L. Peterson, Frank F. Murtha.

Электронная книга "MarketPsych: How to Manage Fear and Build Your Investor Identity", Richard L. Эту книгу можно прочитать в Google Play Книгах на компьютере, а также на устройствах Android и iOS. Выделяйте текст, добавляйте закладки и делайте заметки, скачав книгу "MarketPsych: How to Manage Fear and Build Your Investor Identity" для чтения в офлайн-режиме.

Richard Peterson and Frank Murtha guide both new and experienced investors through the psychological learning process necessary to achieve their financial goals. An investor's guide to understanding the most elusive (yet most important) aspect of successful investing - yourself. Why is it that the investing performance of so many smart people reliably and predictably falls short? The answer is not that they know too little about the markets.

Use features like bookmarks, note taking and highlighting while reading MarketPsych: How to Manage Fear and . Audible book Switch back and forth between reading the Kindle book and listening to the Audible book with Whispersync for Voice

Use features like bookmarks, note taking and highlighting while reading MarketPsych: How to Manage Fear and Build Your Investor Identity (Wiley Finance). Audible book Switch back and forth between reading the Kindle book and listening to the Audible book with Whispersync for Voice. Similar books to MarketPsych: How to Manage Fear and Build Your Investor Identity (Wiley Finance). Kindle (5th Generation).

MarketPsych is good at describing the mental traps and pitfalls that investors suffer

MarketPsych is good at describing the mental traps and pitfalls that investors suffer. Though I am past all of those traps and pitfalls, nonetheless, I remember what it was like to get past the, and this book would've helped me get past them faster.

Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read. Start by marking Marketpsych: How to Manage Fear and Build Your Investor Identity as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read.

Richard Peterson and Frank Murtha guide both new and experienced investors through the psychological . Chapter 1 Your Investor Identity: And Why You Need One 1. Chapter 2 Investor Identity Fundamentals: Frames, Motivations, and Goals 15. Chapter 3 Your Investor Personality: Your Character and Style 49. Chapter 4 Your Investor Emotions: The Hidden Drivers of Behavior 69.

Richard Peterson, MD. Data/Consulting. which is rearranging our relations and identities with its own logic, or in the cause of someone else's interests we can't even see. Dr. Peterson is CEO of the MarketPsych group of companies where he leads MarketPsych's data and asset management division. He has trained thousands of professionals globally to leverage behavioral insights. Peterson is a board-certified psychiatrist. Frank F Murtha, PhD. Insights/Consulting. This is Not Propaganda: Adventures in the War Against Reality.

by Richard L. Peterson & Frank F. Are you ready to build habits, face your fears and change your life? Because that's the Powe. 13 Things Mentally Strong People Don't Do: Take Back Your Power, Embrace Change, Face Your Fears, and Train Your Brain for Happiness and Success. In an easy and entertaining style that masks the book's scientific rigor, the authors make complex scientific insights readily understandable and actionable, shattering a number of investing myths along the way. You will gain understanding of your true investing motivations, learn to avoid the unseen forces that subvert your performance, and build your investor identity - the foundation for long-lasting investing success.

An investor's guide to understanding the most elusive (yet mostimportant) aspect of successful investing - yourself.

Why is it that the investing performance of so many smart peoplereliably and predictably falls short? The answer is not thatthey know too little about the markets. In fact, they know toolittle about themselves.

Combining the latest findings from the academic fields ofbehavioral finance and experimental psychology with thedown-and-dirty real-world wisdom of successful investors, Drs.Richard Peterson and Frank Murtha guide both new and experiencedinvestors through the psychological learning process necessary toachieve their financial goals.

In an easy and entertaining style that masks the book’sscientific rigor, the authors make complex scientific insightsreadily understandable and actionable, shattering a number ofinvesting myths along the way. You will gain understanding of yourtrue investing motivations, learn to avoid the unseen forces thatsubvert your performance, and build your investor identity - thefoundation for long-lasting investing success.

Replete with humorous games, insightful self-assessments,entertaining exercises, and concrete planning tools, this book goesbeyond mere education. MarketPsych: How to Manage Fear and BuildYour Investor Identity functions as a psychological outfitterfor your unique investing journey, providing the tools, trainingand equipment to help you navigate the right paths, stay on them,and see your journey through to success.

Comments: (7)
Daizil
If I read this book when I started investing instead of this year, I expect that I would be hundreds of thousands of dollars better off today than I am. None of the books I've encountered before this one helped me correctly identify the behavior that was sabotaging my performance.

In practical terms, I have never had a problem accepting loses quickly, but I always had a problem holding onto winners. I had always assumed that I was simply risk averse or humble enough to take a small profit. The funny thing was that I never really felt good about taking a small profit (although it beat small losses).

The truth of the matters is that I was overconfident and attempting to optimize through timing what was already a very good set of investments.

There is one regret much greater than watching an account balance fall, and that is looking back 10-15 years later and realizing how much money you would have had you simply stuck with the first 5-10 stocks you ever bought (after diligent research of course).

For me at least, Chapter 6, is worth the price of the book.
Maveri
Great book on realizing that we individual investors at certain times when the market is overreacting should be doing the exact opposite of what the market (i..e.,big institutions) and our emotions tell us. For example, when everyone is selling, fear rules the day (i.e., everyone and their mother is panicking), and stock prices are plummeting, we should at some point be BUYING, not selling!

On the other hand, when everyone is buying and greed rules, we should be selling and taking profits! It's almost as if Warren Buffet, the greatest investor of all time, wrote this book! A MUST READ for beginning or seasoned investors! Now I don't let my emotions dictate my decisions to buy or sell, thank God! I sell into rallies, and then have money when corrections come, so I can buy stocks at a discount to their fair value! ALWAYS REMEMBER, MR. MARKET ISN'T RATIONAL AT TIMES, AND AT THOSE TIMES WE CAN SELL OVER-PRICED STOCKS AND BUY UNDER-PRICED STOCKS IF OUR EMOTIONS DON'T OVERRULE COMMON SENSE!
GawelleN
Reading this book now. While it has some interesting research on the role of emotions in buying and selling stocks, the authors must not have taken time to proofread their book. That, or the points that seek to make are elusive.

Chapter 4, for example, starts with a talk about a 61 year old named Ed who now has some 12 million in assets. Before the financial crisis in 2008 he had 1.5 million. He must have followed the authors advice, correct?

Nope, esentially the entire chapter is a look at what Ed did wrong.. And concludes on p96 on how he made his "mistakes".

This chapter makes no sense whatsoever to me; I invite the authors to clarify what I'm missing here.
Uranneavo
MARKET PSYCH is a book for investors, which can give you a level of protection that a financial professional may not able to offer. Through the ages dating back to Ancient Greek philosophers, mankind has b been encouraged to "know thyself." Nevermore important in the mysterious mechanism of investing has it been so important to know one's self. And this admonition has been repeated throughout history. Even Clint Eastwood has opined, "A man's got to know his limitations."

The investment world as the authors point out could be given the nomenclature of the speculative world more accurately. You are playing with the house, and the house has all the advantages, although many people "invest" to have something to talk about whether buying speculative stocks, bonds or real property most of us have to invest in order to have funds to live on after our productive employment years come to an end. In truth it is a much more serious matter, and most people know that Social Security will no longer support the golden years. So it will be up to you. That's why the fortunate readers of this book have the opportunity to gain advantage. It is a chance to refine one "self" as a tool in managing one's future.

I have often wondered how the name "securities "came about, when I learned from Helen Keller, in reality, there is no such thing as security.

"Security is mostly a superstition
It does not exist in nature
Neither do the children of men
Experience it often
Avoidance of danger is no safer in the long run
Than outright exposure
Life is either a daring adventure or nothing"

The authors, Peterson and Murtha attack this issue directly addressing the fear that most investors, individual or profession have suppressed to either conscious or unconscious fear, which impairs their judgment on an issue so critical to one's future.

I think this book is essential for so many who rely on their own overconfidence to take them through to a "secure future." I think anyone planning a trip to the jungle or climbing a mountain, or even taking a vacation, would want to rely on and hone their own judgment in planning a venture with some degree of risk.

This book lays out chapter by chapter the steps needed to optimize your investor
Self- awareness. It is pretty common knowledge that many talented people wind up in the poor house at the final chapters of life having lived short term comforts. It is also known that it is hard to see your own self, let alone identify your blind spots and be able to work on them. In this world, one will need a lot of fore-vision to come out whole. Even highly trained psychiatrists and psychologists I have known, have their blind spots, despite their expertise in their professional field. They are no match for the investment professional.
Furthermore, our culture has evolved to accept both willful and naïve deception and lying as part of the acceptable culture. It is possible that a trusted and honest advisor could also be deceived. So then the book comes back to you're as an investor to hone your own self through self-awareness. And, therefore your identity as an investor has to evolve, and you will know what you are doing to your "self" and your loved ones, all the better.

I found the common sense approach of the book allowed them to take my hand and gently guide me through the steps toward identifying repressed fear and towards a more confident identity as an investor/speculator. To me, the importance of this book is even more important as government evolves as an entity to take from your rather than to provide for you. Ask a young person what they expect to get from government or Social Security!

Furthermore the pressures of media and the parade of experts in finance offer potential confusion. Who do you follow or should you avoid joining the "herd" or just bury your head in the sand. I liked Chapter 2 on Investor Identity. The easy examples and analogies crystalize the concepts and points the authors want to impart to the reader. This gets you thinking about your "self", your goals and where you want to go and the "risks" rather than the rewards of how you get there. It's all important and worth consideration.

One thing I found helpful, is the many questions that the authors ask the reader to contemplate. Rarely does one ask questions of themselves, but asks questions about the investment. To me, this is quite important and one of the elements that differentiates the approach of this book from the many other " Behavioral Finance" books I have read.

I don't want to steal the thunder of this book, but the authors have the ability to understand the reader and his/her limitations as a player in the investment/speculation world. You have to read it and put yourself into it, and be willing to examine yourself.
The authors know the investment world and the people world, and can help you to understand your identity as an investor.

This book, in contrast to others I have read on investing will prepare you to be a more effective self in the investing/speculating world. It can also be read and applied by investment professionals. An old axiom of the investment world, like "customer's man" and " know your customer" have now evolved into "know your investing self" thanks to these kind and brilliant authors.

The authors use a method similar to the Socratic, to teach through self -examination.

This book is a big winner.
Andronrad
I liked the book and have given it to a couple of people. I have given audible to more .... easier to listen than read i suppose with traffic.
Great insights into your specifics as to Market Sensitivity. If you invest, you will enjoy.
Mildorah
This book goes far beyond the classic truisms about there being no place for emotions in trading to how you can manage them to trade better.
Perilanim
Excellent.
I found this work by Richard Peterson and Frank Murtha to be a very valuable contribution to my perspective in thinking about ways to enhance the effectiveness of my investment decision process....and as an advisor, good ideas aimed at improving my ability to constructively help improve client process as well.

While it clearly has evolved from a substantial body of research, the presentation style and concise delivery are refreshingly divergent from a number of the more scholarly (and obtuse) works I've read.

If you are looking for thoughtful insights about building a better mental mousetrap as an investor, you should give this a read.
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