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eBook Good Business: Your World Needs You epub

by Giles Gibbons,Steve Hilton

eBook Good Business: Your World Needs You epub
  • ISBN: 1587991616
  • Author: Giles Gibbons,Steve Hilton
  • Genre: Business
  • Subcategory: Marketing & Sales
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: Texere; 2 edition (January 21, 2005)
  • Pages: 288 pages
  • ePUB size: 1221 kb
  • FB2 size 1193 kb
  • Formats lrf docx lit mobi


Steve Hilton, Giles Gibbons

Steve Hilton, Giles Gibbons. Or shoes from the company that also uses its brand to promote anti-smoking?In Good Business, the authors argue that in the 21st century, the successful companies will be those that use their power and influence to work for social progress. And they’ll do it because making the world a better place will also be the best way to make money. This is social marketing and is the core idea behind Good Business.

Steve Hilton & Giles Gibbons. Download PDF book format. 65. 08 21. Personal Name: Hilton, Steve. Publication, Distribution, et. New York : London. Choose file format of this book to download: pdf chm txt rtf doc. Download this format book. Good business : your world needs you Steve Hilton & Giles Gibbons. Book's title: Good business : your world needs you Steve Hilton & Giles Gibbons. National Bibliography Number: GBA2-Y9034.

Hilton and Gibbons have written an excellent book on corporate social responsibility which is full of. .

Hilton and Gibbons have written an excellent book on corporate social responsibility which is full of motivational reasons as to why companies should be responsible for the world’s problems and their resolution. The book is well-written and easily read and you find yourself agreeing with the authors.

Steve Hilton and Giles Gibbons founded Good Business in 1997, a London-based consulting firm which advises companies on how they can help themselves by helping society. Their clients, include Coca Cola, Nike, Morgan Stanley Dean Witter, Sky TV, DaimlerChrysler, and McDonald¿s. Steve and Giles managed and raised private-sector funds for an award-winning anti-racism campaign for the UK¿s Commission for Racial Equality. The authors are the founders (1997) of a British consulting firm that specializes in social marketing.

Good Business by Steve Hilton and Giles Gibbons (co-founders of Britain's first social marketing company, "Good Business") has a.If you want to help your business, then help change the world

Good Business by Steve Hilton and Giles Gibbons (co-founders of Britain's first social marketing company, "Good Business") has a very direct and candid message: "If you want to change the world, then do it through business. If you want to help your business, then help change the world.

Steve Hilton and Giles Gibbon. Hilton, S. and Gibbon, G. (2002), "Good Business: Your World Needs You", Corporate Communications: An International Journal, Vol. 7 No. 4, pp. 277-278. Corporate Communications: An International Journal. Emerald Group Publishing Limited.

Good Business: Your World Needs You, Steve Hilton and Giles Gibbons. Dinner with Mugabe: The Untold Story, Heidi Holland. Politicians and Public Services: Implementing Change in a Clash of Cultures, Kate Jenkins. Carlton on Carlton, Joan Dillinger. The BPB aside, Xaxier couldn’t remember the last time he’d read a book of any description. He seriously doubted whether he’d read thirty-three books in total during his whole bloody life.

STEVE HILTON along with Giles Gibbons founded Good Business, a London based consulting firm which advises companies on how they can help themselves by helping society. Prior to Good Business, Steve Hilton was a campaign manager for Prime Minister John Major's successful 1992 Election. He then moved to Saatchi & Saatchi. Steve is also a former columnist for the Observer, writing on media and marketing issues. He also writes for the Times, Evening Standard and Sun newspapers. Five Days in London, John Lukas. Hitler's Empire: Nazi Life in Occupied Europe, Mark Mazower. Paradise Lost: Smyrna 1922: The Destruction of Islam's City of Tolerance, Giles Milton. 1948: The First Arab Israeli War, Benny Morris. Cold Cream: My Early Life and Other Mistakes, Ferdinand Mount. Thinking in Time: The Uses of History for Decision Makers, E Neudstadt and Ernest R May. Britain in Africa, Tom Porteous.

If you want to stop an eight year old boy from smoking - who is he most likely to listen to? parents? teachers? the government? or Nike? If that same boys parents are buying him a Christmas gift, which will they chose? Sports shoes from the company that only promotes its brand? Or shoes from the company that also uses its brand to promote anti-smoking? In Good Business, the authors argue that in the 21st century, the successful companies will be those that use their power and influence to work for social progress. And theyll do it because making the world a better place will also be the best way to make money.
Comments: (2)
Hellmaster
I found it extremely hard to keep my mind on this book. I felt exactly the way the average customer feels when confronted by a high pressure used car salesman. These people were here to sell me something - and anything goes if it clinches the sale.
Having said that, there is value in the book as it demonstrates areas in which business and customers can work together to find arenas of social activity that are to their mutual advantage. It also puts forward good examples of why it is to the advantage of a company to engage in these sorts of activity and that they can turn a profit out of it as well.
The first two chapters are better forgotten. They set up the least sophisticated of the arguments against globalisation as a sort of straw man that they then tear down with decidedly simplistic and statistically dubious arguments. (It is one of the banes of this very important debate that each side presents totally 'authoritative' statistics that 'prove' the exact opposite of each other. However, these authors argue that the gap between rich and poor is not growing wider, which *really* requires some fancy definition bending.)
In the rest of the book, it is necessary to ignore the underlying theme that anybody who criticizes an aspect of business practice or the current global system is antibusiness and because some business is doing things well and responsibly all business is therefore beneficial. Neither extreme position is true. This leaves the possibility of becoming interested in the examples that they cite of good practice and thinking, with them, of how these examples could be spread and expanded. There are clearly many opportunities and it is equally clear that the authors' particular promotional skills will often be useful in identifying these opportunities and working out effective ways of getting them accepted and implemented.
Kulafyn
Enron. WorldCom. Tyco. And the list goes on. Capitalism is practically a dirty word. Conversations in board rooms, executive suites, universities, and other environments of though wrestle with how corporations can pull themselves out of the quicksand of questionable integrity. Hilton and Gibbons have a few suggestions.
The authors are the founders (1997) of a British consulting firm that specializes in social marketing. They've built an enviable track record already working with a range of clients including Coca-Cola and Nike. Their position is that companies should start becoming the solution to the world's problems instead of being seen as the cause. By using their power for social good, they can influence environment issues, human rights, and social justice.
Seven chapters carry the message: Orthodoxy, Heresy, Responsibility, Leadership, Anatomy, Possibility, and Unity. Intrigued? Prepare to read an interesting book filled with examples and stories about how business became so unpopular, but really isn't so bad after all. The heresy chapter tells the other side of the story that is pounded at us through the media: globalization makes the poor richer, corporations are good for human rights, and we can close sweatshops and end child labor. Under Responsibility, the authors explore how corporations respond to all this criticism and how they can be truly socially responsible. Leadership is needed-real leadership, not just lip service. Commercialism, profit, and social good can all live together in harmony. The authors offer some ideas about what business could do to make a real difference and how ordinary citizens can join the movement for common good.
This is an almost conversational book that is comfortable to read. You'll gain some new perspectives and perhaps some inspiration.
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