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eBook Buildings in Disguise epub

by Joan Marie Arbogast

eBook Buildings in Disguise epub
  • ISBN: 159078099X
  • Author: Joan Marie Arbogast
  • Genre: Children
  • Subcategory: Arts Music & Photography
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: Boyds Mills Press (November 1, 2004)
  • Pages: 32 pages
  • ePUB size: 1423 kb
  • FB2 size 1362 kb
  • Formats mobi lrf docx azw


Joan Marie Arbogast is the author of one book for adult readers and is published in numerous children's and family magazines.

Joan Marie Arbogast is the author of one book for adult readers and is published in numerous children's and family magazines . .Joan Marie Arbogast is the author of one book for adult readers and is published in numerous children's and family magazines. She lives in Stow, Ohio.

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I am blessed to call Joan Marie Arbogast my friend. Buildings in Disguise was published in 2004 by Boyds Mills Press. She’s encouraged and inspired me, as a Catholic mom and as a writer. It is a wonderfully photographed book about mimetic architecture – so called because the buildings mimic animals, food, and other things

Join Joan Marie Arbogast in this IRA Children's and Young Adults' Book Award winner as she traces the history of this . Buildings in Disguise" is an entertaining trip through American offbeat architecture, yesterday and today.

Join Joan Marie Arbogast in this IRA Children's and Young Adults' Book Award winner as she traces the history of this funtastic form of architecture.

Join Joan Marie Arbogast as she traces the history of this "fun tastic form of architecture in the US. Discover a variety of eye-catching, head-turning buildings beginning with our nation's oldest functioning example, Lucy the Elephant, to one of our youngest, a beagle named Sweet Willy.

Written by Joan Marie Arbogast. Check out some of the funnest forms of architecture in the United States, with real buildings in crazy shapes. Answer clues based on the content and vocabulary words from Buildings In Disguise.

Join Joan Marie Arbogast in this IRA Children's and Young Adults' Book Award winner as she traces the .

Join Joan Marie Arbogast in this IRA Children's and Young Adults' Book Award winner as she traces the history of this funtastic form of architecture in the United States.

Buildings in disguise. Architecture That Looks Like Animals, Food, and Other Things. by Joan Marie Arbogast. As the endpaper maps show, Arbogast ranges from coast to coast, opening with Lucy, the Margate, NJ, elephant still in use after almost 125 years, closing with Sweet Willy, a 30-foot-high Idaho beagle completed just last year. In between, she profiles an entire office building shaped like a picnic basket, Long Island’s renowned Big Duck, South Dakota’s Corn Palace, plus arrays of hot dog and fried-chicken stands, quirky motels, and gas stations.

Buildings in Disguise: Architecture That Looks Like Animals, Food, and Other Things. J 720 GOL. Spectacular Skycrapers by Meish Goldish.

Boyds Mills Press publishes a wide range of high-quality fiction and nonfiction picture books, chapter books, novels, and nonfiction
Comments: (5)
Bulace
I love this book.
good info.
LadyShlak
Why not plan a road trip from the Elephant to the Madonna Inn? I doubt that any nation on Planet Earth has an equal variety of odd-ball buildings that kids would love to visit, have their picture taken with, and take home for Show and Tell. Lucy the Elephant near Atlantic City has a window in her butt, and used to be a bathhouse where you could change into your clothes after a tough day on the beach. The Teapot Gas station in Zillah is sort of a gateway to wineries in the area. The ORIGINAL White Castle in Wichita is about the size of a garage. The Corn Palace in Mitchell, SD is often the site of a Prairie Home Companion show. It would be such fun to do a BIG book of Weird America with lots more sites to visit. But this one has plenty, and lots of possibilities for the classroom using mapping, Google, and virtual travel. The book has maps front and back with many states devoid of sites. There's the challenge for the classroom--to find something in every state and build a national directory of nutty architecture. Start your engines!
Kahavor
I ordered this book for the library where I work. My main reason was to have something on hand about Lucy, the Margate Elephant, since it's in our area. I would have been satisfied at almost anything on a child's reading level, but was pleasantly surprised at the quality of the book.

The photos are large and plentiful, mostly in full color, and printed on high-quality glossy paper. The text is not difficult yet doesn't talk down to the reader. I've watched several tv shows on this type of architecture, yet there are buildings in this book I'd never heard of before. Likewise, there is more explanation about some familiar buildings than I'd come across before.

At the end the author provides a bibliography of books suitable for both children and adults. She has even starred adult books which will be of special interest to kids because of great illustrations or explanations. A list of websites is also given.

The book is a total pleasure to look at, read and touch. I hope to see it on a list of award-winners sometime soon.
Skyway
We love this book. It is creative and helps to bring forth related memories and stories.
Felolv
This review first appeared in the "Ephrata (PA) Review":

This book's cover catches (merited) attention and readers' imagination; it features a building shaped as an elephant. Lucy-constructed of nearly 1 million pieces of wood, 200 kegs of nails and 4 tons of bolts and beams-makes her home in Margate, New Jersey. Erected in 1881, the elephant is the nation's oldest example of mimetic architecture-buildings that mimic other objects.

Designed by engineer and land-developer James V. Lafferty Jr., Lucy was meant to attract potential buyers of land that Lafferty owned near the growing seaside resort of Atlantic City. The marketing ploy paid off, hugely, and residents grew fond of the community's "mascot." In 1976 Lucy was designated a National Historic Landmark.

Travelers have purchased gas at stations designed to look like teapots, gas cans, pagodas, even an iceberg. They've stayed in lodgings resembling giant teepees, windmills, and ships. They've eaten at restaurants and food stands shaped like milk bottles, dogs, watermelons, castles, roosters, and ice cream cones.

This attractive book, highlighting 35 still existing mimetic structures, provides fun and facts as it explores a whimsical, little-known facet of Americana.
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