» » How the Stars Fell into the Sky: A Navajo Legend (Sandpiper Houghton Mifflin Books)

eBook How the Stars Fell into the Sky: A Navajo Legend (Sandpiper Houghton Mifflin Books) epub

by Jerrie Oughton

eBook How the Stars Fell into the Sky: A Navajo Legend (Sandpiper Houghton Mifflin Books) epub
  • ISBN: 0395779383
  • Author: Jerrie Oughton
  • Genre: Children
  • Subcategory: Geography & Cultures
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: HMH Books for Young Readers; Sandpiper Houghton Mifflin Books edition (March 3, 1996)
  • Pages: 32 pages
  • ePUB size: 1409 kb
  • FB2 size 1426 kb
  • Formats azw lit mobi mbr


Publisher: Houghton Mifflin Juvenile Books (30 Ma. Jerrie Oughton has written several novels for young adults. Her first, Music From a Place Called Half Moon. was awarded the Bank Street College Children's Book Award. She lives with her husband in Lexington, Kentucky.

Publisher: Houghton Mifflin Juvenile Books (30 Mar. 1992).

This book is writen in the thoughts and belifes of the Native Americans. It is about how the starts got into the sky. I kids 4 and 14 love this book.

About the Author: Jerrie Oughton has written several novels for young adults.

How the Kangaroos got their Tails - Продолжительность: 4:09 Dave Edgren Recommended for you. 4:09.

Every LIKE makes Chrome Dinosaur faster. How the Kangaroos got their Tails - Продолжительность: 4:09 Dave Edgren Recommended for you.

Boston : Houghton Mifflin. inlibrary; printdisabled; ; china.

Navajo Indians-Folklore. Children's Books/Ages 4-8 Fiction. Indians of North America. Lists With This Book. About the Authors 4. Jerrie Oughton page on TeachingBooks. Native American Stories. A Universe of Stories! CSLP Children. A Universe of Stories! CSLP.

Jerrie Oughton has written several novels for young adults. Oughton's fine debut provides Desimini with the best vehicle she's had for her spare, powerful style.

Find nearly any book by Jerrie Oughton. Get the best deal by comparing prices from over 100,000 booksellers. by Jerrie Oughton, Lisa Desimini. ISBN 9780780763685 (978-0-7807-6368-5) Hardcover, Perfection Learning, 1996.

This retelling of a Navajo folktale explains how First Woman tried to write the laws of the land using stars in the sky, only to be thwarted by the trickster Coyote.
Comments: (7)
Inth
I actually purchased this book because I loved the cover art, and the title, "How the Stars Fell into the Sky," intrigued me. The image of the Navajo woman, star in hand, gazing up thoughtfully into the dark, "new" sky really captured and held my attention. I wanted to read this book! :) I also felt that it would be worth sharing and discussing with my students.

The illustrations are amazing; they feel warm, soft, and alive--not harsh or garish at all. Each image underscores the emotions and actions of this story of First Woman who wants to communicate laws to her people---present and future--in such away as the laws would always be accessible and always be remembered. She carefully places stars in certain patterns until the impatient, meddling Coyote offers to help--which eventually brings the woman grief and human beings confusion.

What's interesting about this story is the dynamic comparison / contrast that occurs with the main characters: First Man, First Woman, and Coyote. The First Man and the Coyote (Man and animal) are both extremely impatient to be getting onto other here and now "Life" activities while the First Woman considers the future, believing that writing the laws is necessary. Writing the laws requires time and careful efforts. It is a sacred duty she takes seriously. Thus, in this tale, the woman is the respectable, responsible, beyond-the-moment person and the dedicated law giver. (Some world legends and myths tend to place women in subservient roles and / or vilify them.) Her only mistake is trusting the Coyote to help her. [Perhaps, this is the warning embedded in the story: beware of "animal instincts," "urges," and haste because they can cause unhappiness, discord, and disorder.]

"How the Stars Fell into the Sky" contains the following collection of universal themes that can be examined and discussed in group / class settings:

First Woman is compelled to write the laws of her people. (Her mission, her divine calling)
First Woman cares for her people and their welfare. (Identification with a Group)
Coyote enters the scene (Animals with human characteristic--talents and flaws.)
First Woman trusts the Coyote at first. (Innocence)
First Woman witnesses the Coyote's tragic deed. (Experience)
First Woman respects the world, nature, and all its cycles (Acceptance)
Humanity has often looked to the heavens / stars for guidance.
Stars are jewels of the sky
trust / distrust
impatience and haste
darkness and light
organization; chaos (confusion)
Haralem
I teach preschool. I luv this story for my daughter who was in kindergarten when I bought this story.
anneli
Cute book
Kerry
Excellent book...can make many connections to today.
Braswyn
Honestly, this is the kind of book I would have read once as a child and then never looked at again. But my daughter loves it and asks for it every night at bed time. I do like the color and style of the pictures. I do like that the vocab steps it up a bit so that my child asks what a word means and thus learns a bit when I read to her.
DrayLOVE
I had to buy this for my sons K12 curriculum and it was actually a really neat story. We had never read it before, but we enjoyed it. It's something I can see us reading again and most likely passing on to others.
Ferri - My name
An fun and deep story.
I like it.
eBooks Related to How the Stars Fell into the Sky: A Navajo Legend (Sandpiper Houghton Mifflin Books)
Contacts | Privacy Policy | DMCA
All rights reserved.
lycee-pablo-picasso.fr © 2016-2020