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eBook Nothing's Fair in Fifth Grade epub

by Barthe DeClements

eBook Nothing's Fair in Fifth Grade epub
  • ISBN: 0142413496
  • Author: Barthe DeClements
  • Genre: Children
  • Subcategory: Growing Up & Facts of Life
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: Puffin Books; First Edition edition (September 11, 2008)
  • Pages: 144 pages
  • ePUB size: 1276 kb
  • FB2 size 1957 kb
  • Formats rtf lit mbr docx


Start by marking Nothing's Fair in Fifth Grade as Want to Read . I haven't read anything else by Barthe DeClements and I don't know why. I think this book may have taught me something about friendship when I was younger. Curious to hear from anyone else who read it as a kid!.

Start by marking Nothing's Fair in Fifth Grade as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read.

Nothing's Fair in Fifth . .has been added to your Cart. Barthe Declements is an author of children's and young adult books

Nothing's Fair in Fifth . Barthe Declements is an author of children's and young adult books.

other books by Barthe DeClements you may enjoy. The Fourth Grade Wizards. Mrs. Hanson, our fifth grade teacher, was sitting at her desk grading papers. We were all sitting at our desks. Sixth Grade Can Really Kill You. This book is dedicated to. my beloved son Christopher. We were supposed to be writing paragraphs with one main sentence and three supporting sentences.

Is nothing fair for you in fifth grade?If so,the book Nothing's Fair in Fifth . Barthe DeClements has created the most wonderful book for fifth-graders to read. Kids of all ages and grades would appreciate it as well, but I imagine that it is a target for most fifth-graders. There is humor, for sure.

Is nothing fair for you in fifth grade?If so,the book Nothing's Fair in Fifth Grade is the perfect book for you to read. Another reason to read the book is because it is full of friendship,so for all of you who like friendship books, this is for you. The story is focused on the life of Elsie Edwards, who goes to a new school and is not welcome there.

A fifth grade class, repelled by the overweight new student who has serious home problems, finally learns to accept he. We’re dedicated to reader privacy so we never track you.

Nothing's Fair in Fifth Grade. To read this book, upload an EPUB or FB2 file to Bookmate. A fifth grade class, repelled by the overweight new student who has serious home problems, finally learns to accept her.

Barthe's books were always books I could not put down as a child. Much like the Beverly Cleary books. Library Thing Part D lements, Barthe. Nothing's Fair in Fifth Grade. A simple, but personal look into human thought and the struggles in relating to others. It shows just how well children can interpret life and other people's feelings. The dialog is engaging and realistic. New York, NY: Puffin, 2009. She was correct, the book is poignantly sharp. It deals with friendship and obesity.

Suddenly everyone wants to help Elsie. Nothing's fair in fifth grade - but sometimes things get better!

So when the book club money disappears, why is the whole class punished? Nothing's fair! But soon Jenny realizes some things aren't fair for Elsie, either. Instead, she plans to send Elsie to boarding school. Suddenly everyone wants to help Elsie. Nothing's fair in fifth grade - but sometimes things get better!

A fifth grade class, repelled by the overweight new student who has serious home problems, finally learns to accept her.
Comments: (7)
Malodor
I was first exposed to the work of Barthe DeClements in my FOURTH-grade year - 1989. During story time, my teacher read this book to us, and I immediately fell in love with it.

Some may compare this to Judy Blume's "Blubber," as both are about fifth-graders, both feature girls who are singled out for teasing and torment due to being overweight, and both the narrator and the object of torment are presented - initially at least - as unsympathetic characters (Elsie because she steals from her classmates and panhandles for forbidden sweets during lunch, Jenifer because of her initial hate of Elsie before she begins to understand Elsie's life situation). However, this book seems to have more heart and certainly has a more satisfying conclusion than "Blubber."

In "Blubber" (which I still enjoy) Judy Blume never characterizes Linda "Blubber" Fischer as anything more than a chubby pushover without a backbone. In "NFIFG," we come to understand why Elsie is the way she is - she comes from a broken home, she's been abandoned by her father (at least it seems so), she has a verbally and physically abusive mother who very likely has some psychological issues of her own, and she eats for comfort. (In that respect the book, published in 1981, may be seen as ahead of its time, being written at a time when the psychology behind obesity was not as widely discussed in the public sphere as it is today.) At the same time, her stealing is not condoned and she is made to face the consequences for her actions.

One other reviewer thought the book was an example of fat-shaming. I can't disagree more. Elsie's suffering doesn't end when she begins to lose weight, because she still has a less-than-ideal home life to contend with, including a mother who is so neglectful and abusive toward her that she won't even buy her new clothes when the old clothes no longer fit (until a classmate's mother shames her into doing so). Jenifer becomes Elsie's friend not because of Elsie's weight loss, but because she comes to understand Elsie's life situation better and to realize that Elsie is a human being with real feelings. Eventually she is able to bring Sharon and Diane around to do the same. And despite her weight loss, Elsie is still a target for bullies and name-calling. There is a sequel, HOW DO YOU LOSE THOSE NINTH GRADE BLUES?, published in 1983, which continues the story of Elsie into high school, and even though she has slimmed down into a svelte beauty by then, the weight loss hasn't solved all of her problems, as she still suffers from insecurity and her relationship with her mother is still strained. Nowhere do I see a message along the lines of MAGGIE GOES ON A DIET (i.e. that losing weight will magically make you popular and solve all of your problems).

As for the narrator, "Blubber"'s Jill Brenner is a spoiled brat and a jerk essentially throughout the entire book, and never grows or matures in any way - the lesson she learns is about standing up for herself, not about treating others with respect, and she never feels any remorse for the torment she caused Linda, even after she herself is on the receiving end of the teasing. In "NFIFG," Jenifer's coming to know Elsie as more than just "the fat girl" - as a human being with real emotions who is mired in a very tough time in her life - seems somewhat cliche and "After School Special"-like at first, but it has better lessons for readers than "Blubber." Jenifer is simply much more likeable than Jill.

Since this was published over 30 years ago, a number of the cultural references are obviously dated - for example, MORK AND MINDY, and when was the last time 10/11-year-old girls listened to Elton John, the Bee Gees, and the Rolling Stones? - but the lessons about not judging a person until you understand his or her life situation, and about looking past a person's attractive (or unattractive) exterior to see the person inside, still hold true. For more of Elsie, read the sequel HOW DO YOU LOSE THOSE NINTH GRADE BLUES?, which gives much more insight into Elsie's unhappy home life and frosty relationship with her mother. Also recommended is 1985's SIXTH GRADE CAN REALLY KILL YOU, which introduces a new character, Helen (who hides her own feelings of inadequacy due to her reading disability through juvenile delinquency) and brings back Jenifer, Elsie, Diane and the rest for supporting roles.
Conjulhala
Loved this book as a 5th grader, and my 5th grade daughter also loved it. She asked for more in the series.
grand star
My granddaughter loved this book and insisted on getting it even though she is just going into 2nd grade. She reads at a 4th grade level.
Rare
This was a gift and a fifth grader at that and she enjoyed the book very much
Rolling Flipper
this book is full of adventure and friendship. I love how this author use such strong actions for Elsie. I would give the author the Nobell award. love her!
wonder if there is a another book to continue this story. the title would be Sixth Grade Stinks. such a good title!
love love love love this book. I would read this a million times if I could...... I wish I want to have another book of this.
Akirg
Daughter enjoyed the book very much.
Skunk Black
The book was a gift for a 5th grader who currently lives in China. He claimed it to be his favorite book EVER and took it to school so his teacher could read it to his class. As a grandmother I was concerned he would think kids have changed too much to enjoy it, but apparently kids are much the same. Barthe DeClements is a dear friend and I was more than delighted to share his review with her!
Kids are mean but everything turns out right at the end. Not what I expected but a good book in general.
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