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eBook Little Runner of the Longhouse epub

by Betty Baker

eBook Little Runner of the Longhouse epub
  • ISBN: 0060203412
  • Author: Betty Baker
  • Genre: Children
  • Subcategory: Literature & Fiction
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: Harper and Row (June 1, 1962)
  • Pages: 64 pages
  • ePUB size: 1344 kb
  • FB2 size 1900 kb
  • Formats lrf doc rtf mbr


Little Runner did his best to convince his mother that he was one of the big boys, but she could not be fooled. We had previously learned about longhouses when we studied Indians last year so ds was pointing things out in the pictures he would not have otherwise noticed or known.

Little Runner did his best to convince his mother that he was one of the big boys, but she could not be fooled. How he finally achieved his goal makes a warmly happy story. The stunning pictures and skillfully chosen words realistically re-create the Iroquois way of life, and children will find this book that they can actually read by themselves both absorbing and delightful. He thought Little Runner's idea of taking Little Brother was hilarious.

Little Runner wants to play big boys games. It is especially appropriate for children living in parts of the country where maple sugaring is done, but every child will identify with the idea of "all the maple sugar they can ea. He wants to wear old clothes and scary masks, just like them. But Mother thinks he's too young. until clever Little Runner thinks of a funny trick to get what he wants.

Little Runner of the Long. has been added to your Cart. It is humorous and yet gives the reader a small window into their life living in a longhouse. It is a sweet children's story, not meant to be offensive, but meant to be positive. Flip to back Flip to front.

But Mother thinks he's too young. Close X. Learn about new offers and get more deals by joining our newsletter.

Little Runner of the Longhouse by Betty Baker, pictures by Arnold Lobel. Three to Get Ready by Betty Boegehold, pictures by Mary Chalmers. What Do They Do? Policemen and Firemen by Carla Greene, pictures by Leonard Kessler. What Spot?, story and pictures by Crosby Bonsall. The Secret Three by Mildred Myrick, pictures of Arnold Lobel. Doctors and Nurses: What Do They Do? by Carla Greene, pictures by Leonard Kessler. Grizzwold, by Syd Hoff. Oscar Otter, by Nathaniel Benchley, pictures by Arnold Lobel.

Betty Lou Baker was born in Bloomsburg, Pennsylvania, on June 20, 1928, to Robert Weidler Baker and Mary (Wentling) . In 1962, Baker's first two books, The Sun's Promise and Little Runner of the Longhouse, were published

Betty Lou Baker was born in Bloomsburg, Pennsylvania, on June 20, 1928, to Robert Weidler Baker and Mary (Wentling) Baker. Baker attended school in Orange, New Jersey before acquiring an array of different jobs. Her early jobs included writing anacrostic crossword puzzles, assembling xylophones, working as a dental assistant, and owning a gift shop. In 1962, Baker's first two books, The Sun's Promise and Little Runner of the Longhouse, were published. The next year, Killer-of-Death(1963) was published and also won Baker her first award, the Western Heritage Award. Besides authoring children's books, she instructed and lectured groups on writing for children.

For your enjoyment is this nice children's book titled Little Runner Of The Longhouse. This one is rated a strong B with wear from shelving. ISBN : N/A Cr. 1962 Of Pages: 63 Color Pictures: Yes Hard or Soft Cover: Hard. Juan Bobo series, by Virginia Schomp, pictures by Jess Yeomans.

A young Indian boy, too young to join the older boys in part of the New Year celebration, celebrates his own way with his family.
Comments: (7)
Arihelm
I remember this book from when I was a little kid. I clearly remember the story - the older bother exploring the many ways he could get his hands on some maple sugar. I also remember the cool, yet simple, pictures that graced the inside pages. My mother must have red the book to me a thousand times and that is why I just had to have a copy of my own. I might even give it to my nephews. Maybe not. ^_^

I don't remember the book having any BAD influence on me. I never tried to kidnap my bother, I never tried to blackmail my parents, I never mishandled museum objects at the museum I work at and I never tried to hunt down deer to trade their skins for a tiny canoe. This is a simple story for kids to enjoy. Sometimes a cigar is just a cigar.
Thiama
great
Cordanara
An excellent choice for a beginning reader or for reading aloud to a small child. It is especially appropriate for children living in parts of the country where maple sugaring is done, but every child will identify with the idea of "all the maple sugar they can eat."
Jay
just as i remembered. it as a child
my sons loved this book growing up
I'll be liking to buy another copy sh they both have one for their children
Agalen
Reason for Reading: Ds read this aloud to me as his reader.

This easy reader starts off with introducing us to Little Runner's way of life in the Indian village, eventually leading up to telling us that today is New Years Day for them. The older children play a game involving masks and an old woman with a basket where they go from longhouse to longhouse asking for maple sugar. The alternative is, if a family does not give maple sugar each boy may take something from them. The indigenous game has some similarities to the traditional roots of modern day Hallowe'en. Of course, Little Runner wants to play, too, but Mother says he is still to little so he cooks up a plan where he has taken Little Brother from Mother and won't give him back until she gives him some maple sugar. Of course, Mother can play the game too and it's quite a funny predicament Little Runner finds himself him.

This is a fun story. We had previously learned about longhouses when we studied Indians last year so ds was pointing things out in the pictures he would not have otherwise noticed or known. He thought Little Runner's idea of taking Little Brother was hilarious. The story is quite simple, but the use of repetition makes it fun and, of course, works on those reading skills. Lobel's artwork is as always just as expected from him. Except for the round baby faces on Little Runner & Brother, the adult Indians have been drawn realistically and respectfully. Recommended but unfortunately is out of print at this time. It is easy enough to find secondhand copies though.
Tygralbine
As an Iroquois (or as we prefer to call ourselves Haudenosaunee), I am deeply
urked by this book!!! The book's sacriligious use of allowing a young boy to play with a false face mask
rips at the core of my religion. A child would never be allowed to show such disregard for such a sacred
object. This book should NOT be read!!!!!!!! At best it should be used to show the disregard for Native American
religion and culture by the dominate society!!!
Weetont
This book, written in 1962, sadly reflects the worst tendencies of Indian-themed children's books.
Little Runner, whose tribe is never identified, looks Anglo and dresses like Daniel Boone. His life is made to look like a cartoon. Sacred items are treated in a disrespectful, offensive way. Imagine a book showing a young Jewish boy playing with a Torah, or a young Christian tossing about a crucifix, and you might get the idea of how offensive this book is.
Avoid this at all costs, and toss it out of your school library. There are many, many children's books with Native themes that are beautiful and entertaining. (...)
When I was younger I really liked my dad to read this book to me. Now that I am almost 8 I can read it to myself. I like Little Runner because he is funny and tries really hard to get maple sugar. It also shows the ways of the Indians long ago. I like the part when he steals his little brother and hides him the best
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