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eBook The Rabbit's Umbrella epub

by George Plimpton,William Pène du Bois

eBook The Rabbit's Umbrella epub
  • ISBN: 0670587044
  • Author: George Plimpton,William Pène du Bois
  • Genre: Children
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: Viking Books for Young Readers; 1St Edition edition (1955)
  • Pages: 159 pages
  • ePUB size: 1648 kb
  • FB2 size 1639 kb
  • Formats docx rtf lit mobi


William Sherman "Billy" Pène du Bois (May 9, 1916 – February 5, 1993) was an American writer and illustrator of books for young readers

William Sherman "Billy" Pène du Bois (May 9, 1916 – February 5, 1993) was an American writer and illustrator of books for young readers. He is best known for The Twenty-One Balloons, published in April 1947 by Viking Press, for which he won the 1948 Newbery Medal. As illustrator he was twice a runner-up for the Caldecott Medal written by others, which he illustrated (below), and the two Caldecott Honor picture books, which he also wrote.

com: The Rabbit's Umbrella: Clean tight and unmarked hardcover in lightly shelf worn price clipped jacket. The Rabbit's Umbrella" is peppered with amusing, imaginative illustrations by William Pène du Bois, which are a complete delight in themselves

com: The Rabbit's Umbrella: Clean tight and unmarked hardcover in lightly shelf worn price clipped jacket. Larger books or sets may require additional shipping charges. Books sent via US Postal. The Rabbit's Umbrella" is peppered with amusing, imaginative illustrations by William Pène du Bois, which are a complete delight in themselves.

The Rabbit's Umbrella book. George Plimpton, William Pène du Bois (Illustrator). Depicts in text and illustrations the fanciful adventures of rabbits with umbrellas.

William Pène du Bois. Flag as Inappropriate. William Pène du Bois was born in Nutley, New Jersey. His father, Guy Pène du Bois, was a noted art critic and painter known for his landscapes and portraits; his cousin Raoul Pene Du Bois would become a noted costume and scenic designer. When Wiliam was eight the family moved to France where he was educated at the Lycée Hoche at Versailles and the Lycée de Nice. They returned to Nutley when he was 14.

William Sherman "Billy" Pène du Bois was an American writer and illustrator of books for young readers. His other most widely held works are five books written by others, which he illustrated, and the two Caldecott Honor picture books, which he also wrote.

William Pène Du Bois (1919-1993) was an illustrator and award winning children's author. The Rabbit's Umbrella. His collection includes correspondence, manuscripts, mock-ups, posters, and original artwork for several of the books he illustrated, including his own works Otto at Sea and Otto in Texas. The Pène du Bois family returned to New Jersey when William was fourteen. After finishing high school, he was accepted, with a scholarship, to the Carnegie Technical School of Architecture. But his college plans dissolved when he sold a book he wrote to pass time during a vacation.

Pène du Bois was born in Nutley, New Jersey. His father, Guy Pène du Bois, was a noted art critic and painter known for his landscapes and portraits. When he was eight, his family moved to France and he attended the Lycee Hoche at Versailles and the Lycee de Nice. His family returned to Nutley when he was 14. After high school he accepted a scholarship to the Carnegie Technical School of Architecture. He also illustrated magazine articles and advertisements.

YOUNG BOY: But there are more things I want to know. I want to know about the rabbit with the umbrella.

William Pene du Bois. Professor William Waterman Sherman just wants to be alone. But when he is found after just three weeks floating in the Atlantic among the wreckage of twenty hot-air balloons, naturally, the world is eager to know what happened.

The rabbit's umbrella. by. Plimpton, George. New York, Viking Press. inlibrary; printdisabled; ; americana. Books for People with Print Disabilities. Internet Archive Books. Uploaded by AltheaB on November 3, 2010.

"The Rabbit's Umbrella," as large and gay as a circus tent, and with a strange assortment of characters, houses a plot as full of twists and surprises as a troupe of juggling clowns. And as for the rabbit himself, the umbrella-holder, whether at the close of the book you think him a figment of the imagination, or actually feel him standing behind you watching you read the book, you'll never forget him after having seen him carouse through Mr. Plimpton's light-hearted fantasy. "The Rabbit's Umbrella" is peppered with amusing, imaginative illustrations by William Pène du Bois, which are a complete delight in themselves.
Comments: (3)
Yellow Judge
Although this is supposed to be a children's book, I have found (over the more than 40 years that I have known of it and enjoyed repeatedly reading it out loud to those that I think would benefit from it, or simply enjoy it) that it speaks to more significant truths than one might expect for a "children's book." Combined with the pure hilarity of a couple of chapters, it is both entertaining and thought-provoking. It addresses what should be most importnt in our lives, the value of working at a job you like, the importance of parent-child relationships, and relationships in general. It considers the importance of pets in a child's life, and of contemplation and time for thoughtful conversation in a society that has become increasingly sped up, racing pel mel, but towards what? Mixed in is a tale of redemption and a little bit of whimsy, couched in a sort of "Princess Bride" story-telling scenario. I can't imagine someone not enjoying this wonderful piece of deceptively simple story-telling..
Talvinl
I read this book mainly to look at the pictures, because I'm a big William Pène du Bois fan, but I figured a story by George Plimpton would be interesting, as well. As it turned out, I found the illustrations to be far better than the actual text, which is a bit meandering and dated. It does have its fun moments, and the ending is surprising and charming, but overall, I was disappointed. The book seems strongly influenced by Roald Dahl [NOTE: I have since been reminded that the story predates Dahl's children's books, so Plimpton could not have been "influenced" by him], but the story doesn't have his imaginative flair, or momentum. The humor occasionally depends on wordplay, which may go over the heads of children who are young enough to appreciate the rather silly and implausible plot. The story concerns the citizens of a small American town, who are struggling over whether to save their old streetcars, now that automobiles have become popular. While this debate rages, a large dog tangles with a trio of extremely inept robbers, with far-reaching repercussions.

The characters are almost all adults who are unusually foolish. The only child named in the story (a boy; little girls don't seem to exist in the fictional town of Adams) doesn't get much "stage time." Another boy exists in a meta-role, as a listener who occasionally interrupts the narrator. I thought these exchanges mainly got in the way of the story, but occasionally they pay off.

I accidentally discovered another meta-joke in the book: I noticed that, unusually, Pène du Bois made a mistake in one of the pictures: he put the grooves of the robbers' "Webley-Vickers" revolver on the wrong side of the cylinder. While checking this, I found that this gun does not exist in real life--it's an invention of Plimpton's colleague James Thurber, who used it in his Walter Mitty stories. Plimpton and Pène du Bois must have decided to include the name as a little joke for their fellow writer/artist.

All in all, if you have a child who likes innocent, silly, but rather complicated stories, they will probably enjoy hearing this one, but it's not the kind of book that I would want to read repeatedly. I would recommend Pène du Bois' own books, such as "The Three Policemen," over this one.
I'm a Russian Occupant
Although first read as a teenager, this book has continued to provide comfort and entertainemnt as I have moved into middle age. In fact, when a female friend of mine and I were both going through divorces, we read this book out loud to each other, enjoying the hysterics and down-home country values, as well as the underlying messages that things can get better, that there are forces at work that are larger than the individual, that pretenses in our society lead to embarassing situations, that spoiling your children is not good, but time spent with them and them having pets are both good things. There is definitely a "Stop and smell the roses" message that is as apropos today as when the book was writeen, if not more so!
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