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eBook Galileo, Bellarmine, and the Bible epub

by Richard J. Blackwell

eBook Galileo, Bellarmine, and the Bible epub
  • ISBN: 0268010242
  • Author: Richard J. Blackwell
  • Genre: Christians
  • Subcategory: Bible Study & Reference
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: University of Notre Dame Press; 1st edition (January 31, 1991)
  • Pages: 304 pages
  • ePUB size: 1150 kb
  • FB2 size 1748 kb
  • Formats lrf azw lrf rtf


Richard J. Blackwell is professor emeritus of philosophy, Saint Louis University. Bellarmine, the most important authority in Galileo's time, interpreted these decrees in the most unfortunate way possible for Galileo

Richard J. Bellarmine, the most important authority in Galileo's time, interpreted these decrees in the most unfortunate way possible for Galileo. Firstly, he took the relation of Bible and tradition to be complementary rather than concurring. Thus the Fathers' approval of geocentrism is independent rather than redundant evidence. Secondly, he took "unanimous agreement of the Fathers" to be achieved when one Father spoke on a matter while the others remained silent.

Richard J. Blackwell is professor emeritus of philosophy, Saint Louis . But Bellarmine and the church establishment had no interest in bringing about Inquisition proceedings. The book acknowledges that, as a devout Catholic himself, Galileo offered detailed explanations of why scripture and science do not conflict in the proposition that the Earth moves around the Sun. The explanations, translated from his own words, are inspiring, and his concepts are surprisingly modern. However, Galileo's Aristotelian enemies (with whom he had debated on floating bodies and mechanics) saw an opportunity. Blackwell offers a fresh approach to the Galileo case, using as his primary focus the biblical and ecclesiastical issues that were the battleground for the celebrated confrontation. Richard J. Blackwell.

Start by marking Galileo, Bellarmine, and the Bible as Want to Read . Blackwell appends the first modern translation into English of this important and neglected document, which was placed on the Index of Forbidden Books in 1616.

Start by marking Galileo, Bellarmine, and the Bible as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read. Though there were differing and competing theories of biblical interpretation advocated in Galileo's time-the legacy of the Council of Trent, the views of Cardinal Bellarmine, the most influential churchman of his time, and, finally, the claims of authority and obedience that weakened the abillity of Jesuit scientists to support the new science-all contributed to the eventual condemnation of Galileo in. 1633.

Galileo, Bellarmine, and the Bible. by Richard J. Galileo, Bellarmine, and the Bible. To read this book, upload an EPUB or FB2 file to Bookmate. Blackwell offers a fresh approach to the Galileo case, using . Galileo once said that science is written in the book of nature, which always lies open in front of our eyes for our inspection

Richard J. by Cardinal Bellarmine and the Jesuits in attempting to weigh the discoveries of the new science in the context of traditional philosophy and theology. Galileo once said that science is written in the book of nature, which always lies open in front of our eyes for our inspection. The methods needed to read this book would constitute, in effect, the logic of science.

Similar books and articles. Galileo, Bellarmine, and the Bible by Richard J. The Louvain Lectures of Bellarmine and the Autograph Copy of His 1616 Declaration to Galileo by Robert Bellarmine; Ugo Baldini; George V. Coyne; Francois de Aguilon, . Scientist and Architect by August Ziggelaar. William Wallace - 1986 - Isis: A Journal of the History of Science 77:190-192. The Louvain Lectures of Bellarmine and the Autograph Copy of His 1616 Declaration to Galileo, And: The Galileo Affair: A Meeting of Faith and Science. Maurice A. Finocchiaro - 1988 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 26 (1):149-151.

Considered the paradigm case of the troubled interaction between science and religion, the conflict between Galileo and the Church continues to generate new research and lively debate. Richard J. Blackwell offers a fresh approach to the Galileo case, using as his primary focus the biblical and ecclesiastical issues that were the battleground for the celebrated confrontation. Blackwell's research in the Vatican manuscript collection and the Jesuit archives in Rome enables him to re-create a vivid picture of the trends and counter-trends that influenced leading Catholic thinkers of the period: the conservative reaction to the Reformation, the role of authority in biblical exegesis and in guarding orthodoxy from the inroads of "unbridled spirits," and the position taken by Cardinal Bellarmine and the Jesuits in attempting to weigh the discoveries of the new science in the context of traditional philosophy and theology. A centerpiece of Blackwell's investigation is his careful reading of the brief treatise Letter on the Motion of the Earth by Paolo Antonio Foscarini, a Carmelite scholar, arguing for the compatibility of the Copernican system with the Bible. Blackwell appends the first modern translation into English of this important and neglected document, which was placed on the Index of Forbidden Books in 1616. Though there were differing and competing theories of biblical interpretation advocated in Galileo's time―the legacy of the Council of Trent, the views of Cardinal Bellarmine, the most influential churchman of his time, and, finally, the claims of authority and obedience that weakened the abillity of Jesuit scientists to support the new science―all contributed to the eventual condemnation of Galileo in 1633. Blackwell argues convincingly that the maintenance of ecclesiastical authority, not the scientific issues themselves, led to that tragic trial.
Comments: (2)
Love Me
If you want to have a better understanding of what really happened between Galileo and the Church, this book is a good place to start. Blackwell tries to deal fairly with the complex religious and sociocultural backdrop of 16th century western civilization. He points out, for instance, that the Church commissioned Copernicus to save appearances of the incorrect calender predicted by the geocentric theory of Ptolmey, and also that many Jesuit scientists of the day were, at one point, sympathetic to the heliocentric theory being defended by Galileo.

The book acknowledges that, as a devout Catholic himself, Galileo offered detailed explanations of why scripture and science do not conflict in the proposition that the Earth moves around the Sun. The explanations, translated from his own words, are inspiring, and his concepts are surprisingly modern. However, although there were rational Catholic authorities who understood that scripture and science must agree on the same physical truths about the world, they were unfortunately overridden― in the case of heliocentrism― by more powerful legates with an opposing ideology. For someone with a scientific mindset, the key issue that requires our daily vigilance is the unjustifiable silencing of free thought and the abuse of power that can result from centralized authority.
JoJolar
The counter-reformation unwittingly provided the weapons with which Galileo would be attacked. Luther challenged church authority and emphasised reliance on and personal understanding of the Bible (sola Scriptura). The Council of Trent was formed to answer this threat. The Council decreed that: God's message was conveyed both through the Bible and unwritten traditions; interpreting the Bible is a matter for the appropriate authorities; "in matters of faith and morals" no one shall dare to interpret the Bible contrary to church tradition and "the unanimous agreement of the Fathers."

Bellarmine, the most important authority in Galileo's time, interpreted these decrees in the most unfortunate way possible for Galileo. Firstly, he took the relation of Bible and tradition to be complementary rather than concurring. Thus the Fathers' approval of geocentrism is independent rather than redundant evidence. Secondly, he took "unanimous agreement of the Fathers" to be achieved when one Father spoke on a matter while the others remained silent. Thus strengthening this independent evidence. Lastly, he interpreted "matters of faith" in such a way that everything in the Bible (geocentrism, the fact that Tobias had a dog, etc.) is a matter of faith. This is the crucial point in Bellarmine's letter to Foscarini. Foscarini and Galileo had a reasonable argument that Copernicanism was not in conflict with the Fathers or the Counsil, but these authoritative interpretations by Bellarmine effectively made any further debate impossible ("checkmate," as Blackwell says).

But Bellarmine and the church establishment had no interest in bringing about Inquisition proceedings. However, Galileo's Aristotelian enemies (with whom he had debated on floating bodies and mechanics) saw an opportunity. By persistently and prominently accusing Galileo of arguing contrary to scripture they forced him into a dilemma: either let the argument stand unopposed (thus blocking his theories from being accepted and pursued) or get involved with the dangerous matter of scriptural interpretation. Galileo chose the latter option; now all the Aristotelians had to do was to sit back and watch the vultures mince this easy pray. Caccini, a petty priest and "a thoroughly nasty person," took the bait and unwittingly executed the Aristotelians' plan. He preached against Galileo with such fervour that his superior had to send Galileo a formal apology (p. 69). And with considerable effort and calculated deceit he managed to force the matter onto the initially reluctant Inquisition (p. 112).
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