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eBook Johannine Faith and Liberating Community epub

by David Rensberger

eBook Johannine Faith and Liberating Community epub
  • ISBN: 0664250416
  • Author: David Rensberger
  • Genre: Christians
  • Subcategory: Bible Study & Reference
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: Westminster John Knox Press; 1st edition (March 1, 1996)
  • Pages: 172 pages
  • ePUB size: 1613 kb
  • FB2 size 1235 kb
  • Formats lrf lrf lit azw


Rensberger, David K. Publication date. Books for People with Print Disabilities. Internet Archive Books.

Building on recent developments in biblical studies, David Rensberger explores new avenues of interpretation of the Fourth Gospel made possible by the rediscovery of its social and historical settings. He looks to the first generation of readers and considers the range of meanings the Gospel might have held for them.

Weight: 9 ounces ISBN: 0664250416 ISBN-13: 9780664250416 Stock No: WW4250416. Publisher's Description. He sees that behind the "spiritual" there is the possibility of social and even political interpretations. He discusses the relation of John's Gospel to liberation theology and to contemporary questions on the role of the church in the world.

Building on revent develeopments in biblical studies, David Rensberger explores a new avenues of interpretation of the Fourth Gospel made possible by the rediscovery of its social and historical settings. He looks to the first generation of readers and considers the range of meanings the Gospel might have help for them. Similar Items you may enjoy! Discovering the New Testament: Community and Faith Author: Alex Varughese, ed.

1st ed. by David K. Rensberger. Published 1988 by Westminster Press in Philadelphia.

David K Rensberger, Religious studies educator. Board of directors Clergy and Laity Concerned, Atlanta, 1988-1989. After years of close contact with the Johannine epistles

n scholarly jargon, "low" christology involves the application to Jesus of titles derived from the Old Testament or intertestamental expectations (. Messiah, prophet, servant. High" christology involves an appreciation of Jesus that moves him into the sphere of divinity, as expressed, for instance, in a more exalted use of Lord and Son of God, as well as the designation "God. Raymond E. Brown, The Community of the Beloved Disciple (London : Chapman, 1979) 25.

Building on recent developments in biblical studies, David Rensberger explores new avenues of interpretation of the Fourth Gospel made possible by the rediscovery of its social and historical settings. He looks to the first generation of readers and considers the range of meanings the Gospel might have held for them. He sees that behind the "spiritual" there is the possibility of social and even political interpretations. He discusses the relation of John's Gospel to liberation theology and to contemporary questions on the role of the church in the world.

Comments: (4)
Dalallador
If you have a heart for liberation theology, you might enjoy getting into bed with this book. However, to my taste, the author is one-eyed, over-insisting on seeing John's gospel as political. He certainly has an axe to grind. Well, of course nothing is non-political. But he makes a whole meal of finding social and political angles in the gospel - and it's a messy meal, repetitive, convoluted, and a bit shrill. A determined and creative editor with decent writing skills might have been able to reduce the book to a more palatable 30-40 pages. Not an easy read. Not a pleasant read.
Vichredag
With all due respect to one of the other reviews, I found Rensberger's writing extremely clear, concise and accessible as an academic book. Furthermore, I sense an underlying passion and excitement from the author in his exploration of the Gospel of John. He writes and thinks with great freshness and originality. He does a superb job of bringing out themes and connections rooted in the social/historical setting of the Johannine community of faith. He does so through what he dubs "modest historical imagination" which is what history will always be about -- application of (often more than) modest imagination. His arguments are theologically sound and humbly presented. I agree with his approach that we must pay close attention to the social/historical setting (however challenging this can be) in order to gain enlightenment as to John's theological intent and purpose. Rensberger does this in a descriptive way rather than an explanatory way, thus enabling the reader to hear John's gospel in an excitingly narrative way. Lastly, he does a nice job in a relatively short space (153 pages) of recapping modern theological works to date that affect the current climate of understanding surrounding the Gospel of John (Bultmann, Meeks, Neyrey, etc.).
Pameala
Rensberger's book is outstanding. I am delighted to see that it has remained in print for so many years. I read it for the first time when I began teaching the Gospel of John at a Christian liberal arts college. I learned so much from it and find that it repays rereading. I am planning on having my honors students read it. I think that the book is not only exemplary of rigorous, insightful scholarship but also of passionate, relevant Christian reflection. (I heartily disagree with the other review of this book!). This is particularly true of the final chapter, "Sect, World, and Mission: Johannine Christianity Today." I've read many books on the Fourth Gospel, and this one ranks among the very best.
Umrdana
Rensberger's book lifts up important connections between liberation theology and the fourth gospel. His writing, however, lacks passion and fails to get to the heart of the issue until the end of the book. Verbosity keeps the reader from easily discerning his points. Still, there are interesting ideas worth pursuing here.
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