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eBook Dominion & Common Grace: The Biblical Basis of Progress epub

by Gary North

eBook Dominion & Common Grace: The Biblical Basis of Progress epub
  • ISBN: 0930464095
  • Author: Gary North
  • Genre: Christians
  • Subcategory: Christian Living
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: Christian Liberty Pr (January 1, 1987)
  • Pages: 312 pages
  • ePUB size: 1766 kb
  • FB2 size 1227 kb
  • Formats lrf lrf mobi docx


Gary North, Dominion & Common Grace: The Biblical Basis of Progress. Tyler, TX: Dominion Press.

Gary North, Dominion & Common Grace: The Biblical Basis of Progress. Smith, Gary Scott, ed. God and Politics: Four Views on the Reformation of Civil Government - Theonomy, Principled Pluralism, Christian America, National Confessionalism. Presbyterian and Reformed Publishing C. 1989, ISBN 0-87552-448-6.

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Other readers will always be interested in your opinion of the books you've read. Whether you've loved the book or not, if you give your honest and detailed thoughts then people will find new books that are right for them. Распространяем знания с 2009.

Dominion & Common Grace. Dominion and Common Grace provides the biblical answers. North deals especially with the hard question of the weakness of the Church in history, and the power of the God-haters in history. The Biblical Basis of Progress. These answers are intended to reshape your life. When enough Christians learn the truth, they will begin to use biblical principles to reshape the world. Christians should not be surprised to learn that humanists don't want to world reshaped by the Bible. How is it that those who hate Christ seem to prosper, while Christians seem to be powerless?

Dominion & Common Grace: The Biblical Basis of Progress. This is the first book I've read by North, though I read him online occasionally. He makes a convincing case for postmillenialism in this book, though that's an indirect purpose.

Dominion & Common Grace: The Biblical Basis of Progress. 0930464095 (ISBN13: 9780930464097). His focus is on common grace and its role in the dominion given to Christians. He argues mostly with and against Van Til in showing how he was right, but inconsistent in his epistemology and eschatology. North has a very interesting, and straight forward approach to interpreting scripture that I found very refreshing.

North, Gary: Dominion and Common Grace: The Biblical Basis of Progress (Tyler, TX: Institute for Christian . Gary Kilgore North (born 1942) is head of the Institute for Christian Economics, and a prominent Christian Reconstructionist, who has written widely on many topics (including postmillennial eschatology)

Dominion & Common Grace: The Biblical Basis of Progress. Gary Kilgore North (born 1942) is head of the Institute for Christian Economics, and a prominent Christian Reconstructionist, who has written widely on many topics (including postmillennial eschatology). My book is what some people will call a 'quickie.

Поиск книг BookFi BookSee - Download books for free. Dominion & Common Grace: The Biblical Basis of Progress. God and Politics: Four Views on the Reformation of Civil Government - Theonomy, Principled Plurlaism, Christian America, National Confessionalism.

If the millennium is followed by great rebellion (Rev. 20:9-10), how can these rebels have been Christians? If they are not Christians, how can the millennium itself be Christian? What is the relationship in history between saving grace and common grace? North deals especially with the hard question of the weakness of the Church in history, and the power of the God-haters in history. How is it that those who hate Christ seem to prosper, while Christians seem to be powerless?
Comments: (6)
thrust
The book is one of my favorites. However, this book was supposed to be in good condition. It arrived in very poor condition and well worn. I will not buy from this seller again.
MeGa_NunC
Gary Kilgore North (born 1942) is head of the Institute for Christian Economics, and a prominent Christian Reconstructionist, who has written widely on many topics (including postmillennial eschatology).

He wrote in the Preface to this 1987 book, "'How can unbelievers possess so much power after generations of Christian dominion?' ... 'How can a world full of reprobates be considered a manifestation of the kingdom of God on earth?' ... Answering these two questions is what this book is all about... The reader should understand in advance that this book is not intended to present the exegetical case for postmillennialism... I simply assume it, and then get on with the business at hand. This is an exercise in apologetics, not systematics. David Chilton's Paradise Restored: A Biblical Theology of Dominion and The Days of Vengeance An Exposition of the Book of Revelation have presented the case for postmillennialism better than I could or any other theologian ever has."

He admits, "Van Til is an enigma to those of us who studied under him or who have struggled through his books. His books are always filled with brilliant insights, but it is very difficult to remember where any single insight appeared. They are scattered like loose diamonds throughout his writings..." (Pg. 10)

He responds to an objection, "there are permanent standards that enable us to distinguish between the life of God-hating Communist Joseph Stalin from the life of God-hating pantheist Albert Schweitzer. There are different punishments for different unregenerate men..." (Pg. 52)

He argues, "Perhaps (Meredith Kline) has decided that it is unwise to try to fight a two-front war: theonomy and postmillennialism. (My attitude is that it is giving away the battle not to fight on both fronts simultaneously, which is what this book is about." (Pg. 139)

Sometimes mean-spirited, this book will still be of interest to those interested in Christian Reconstruction/Theonomy.
RED
I've been a Christian for ten years and I was nauseous at the (what I now know to be) antinomian pessimistic pietism in the church. I've been Reformed and postmillennial for five, praise the Lord - skipped right over amillennialism. There is no way I could ever believe that Christians lose in history - it's unfathomable. I believe in the applicability of God's law for every area of life. I believe in pushing the antithesis. What I struggled with (until now) was the doctrine of common grace. I knew God provided rain for both the elect and the non-elect. But while I never wondered about the "final rebellion" in history (Rev. 20), I did wonder how to resolve the apparent dilemma of what a believer is to do regarding maintaining the antithesis with the world and yet recognizing that there were positive contributions they made to culture, e.g., wealth, logic, etc., even though they never gave glory to God. I wrestled with "are we to give unbelievers our pearls?" (e.g., parenting wisdom, homeschooling, leadership models, economic laws) and thereby make them better enemies of God? Or do we let them remain consistent with their professed presuppositions and reap the wrath of God. This was my dilemma. Now, with this book by Dr. North, not only were those questions answered, but far more! I now have a working theology of the common curse and special curse, common grace and special grace, consistency with presuppositions and inconsistency, external blessings to external obedience to the law (common grace), and external curses (judgment) to autonomy and arrogance. I understand the progressive sanctification of culture in history, the highs and lows of culture led by the church (special grace) and followed by the world (common grace). I understand much more. I am so impressed with this book. It also distinguishes between theonomic postmillennialism (which the author and I embrace) and pietistic postmillennialism (e.g., Jonathan Edwards). I wish this book were more prevalent in the Reformed community. I've been postmill and Reformed for five years and just "happened" to pick up my already purchased copy of this book because of the title which included the words "common grace." In God's perfect timing, He knew what I need to read to answer the questions to my dilemmas. It's a fabulous book and I highly recommend it for all Christians to read. It filled in my gaps. When Christians share the Law of God with unbelievers (and it better have the Gospel attached to it), even if all the unbelievers do is adopt our worldview apart from our Lord (e.g., are inconsistent), everyone still benefits from a culture that is more consistent with the Law of God. Should they never convert, well then the heaping of the coals on their heads is in God's hands. I want Christian culture for me, my children and grandchildren. It begins with evangelism, and consistent Christianity (special grace and consistent epistemological self-consciousness). Common grace then, like crumbs from the table, spreads to the unbelievers. I knew they always borrowed from our worldview (pushing the antithesis), but now I know how that works and why it's important they continue to do so, but that Christians should never borrow from the unbelievers (which leads to syncretism, apostasy, and judgment). All this is to say I can't thank Dr. North enough for this tremendous work. Get this book and read it. I've added to my homeschool high school curriculum so my children have a proper and biblical philosophy of history not just victory in history, but also how that victory works.
Naktilar
The wheat of special grace and the tares of special wrath are on opposite courses through history. Both are maturing in their respective conditions. The great irony is that the tares can only survive and flourish when they try to look like wheat and feed on the spill-over of God's common grace rain and fertilizer.
This is North's best work. He must think so too given all of the places it has shown up: several appendicies, this book, taped lectures, and essays.
One word of warning, don't buy into the grief North gives Cornelius Van Til. CVT is well worth reading - even if he is difficult.
Arihelm
I agree with Andrew Sandlin: the great value of this book is that it is the first to suggest a theoretical mechanism for postmillennialism. Without this sort of understanding of common grace, it is difficult to see how the Christianization of the world could progress in the way postmils believe, and North alone has produced it. Kudos to him!
Fordredor
This is probably the author's best--certainly his most original--work. His thesis is that God's common grace to the wicked increases over time, though this in no way implies His favor to them. Rather, it assures an increasingly godly society as the wicked are forced to obey God's law if they are to succeed in their earthly lives.
The great value of this book is that it is the first to suggest a theoretical mechanism for postmillennialism.
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