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eBook Creationism's Trojan Horse: The Wedge of Intelligent Design epub

by Paul R. Gross,Barbara Forrest

eBook Creationism's Trojan Horse: The Wedge of Intelligent Design epub
  • ISBN: 0195319737
  • Author: Paul R. Gross,Barbara Forrest
  • Genre: Christians
  • Subcategory: Theology
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: Oxford University Press; Updated ed. edition (May 16, 2007)
  • Pages: 448 pages
  • ePUB size: 1595 kb
  • FB2 size 1159 kb
  • Formats azw lrf mobi rtf


Actually, the book is just as up to date as when it was published, but only because Intelligent Design proponents are making exactly the same arguments that Young Earth Creationists such as Henry Morris were making 40 years ago. The only difference is that the current creationists.

Actually, the book is just as up to date as when it was published, but only because Intelligent Design proponents are making exactly the same arguments that Young Earth Creationists such as Henry Morris were making 40 years ago. The only difference is that the current creationists have stripped out their brand of religion from their arguments (except when they are addressing their natural constituency of fundamentalist Christians).

Forrest and Gross expose the scientific failure, the religious essence, and the political ambitions of intelligent design creationism. They examine the movement's Wedge Strategy.

Creationism's Trojan Horse: The Wedge of Intelligent Design is a 2004 book by Barbara Forrest and Paul R. Gross on the origins of intelligent design. Gross on the origins of intelligent design, specifically the Discovery Institute's Center for the Renewal of Science and Culture and its wedge strategy. The authors are highly critical of what they refer to as intelligent design creationism, and document the intelligent design movement's fundamentalist Christian origins and funding.

Creationism's Trojan Horse book.

In Creationism's Trojan Horse, Forrest and Gross document the agenda and advances of "Intelligent Design .

In Creationism's Trojan Horse, Forrest and Gross document the agenda and advances of "Intelligent Design," the most recent manifestation of American science education's perennial affliction: creationism. Explaining and analyzing what "design theorists" call their "Wedge Strategy" - an attempt to substitute "theistic science" for natural science in the public mind - this book documents the Wedge's aggressive, decade-long public relations campaign to implement the strategy

She co-authored Creationism's Trojan Horse: The Wedge of Intelligent Design (Oxford University Press, 2004), with biologist Paul R. Gross.

She co-authored Creationism's Trojan Horse: The Wedge of Intelligent Design (Oxford University Press, 2004), with biologist Paul R. The book examines the goals and strategies of the intelligent design movement and its attempts to undermine the teaching of evolutionary biology. If DI thought this would unsettle me, they were.

Home Browse Books Book details, Creationism's Trojan Horse: The Wedge o. .Forrest and Gross expose the scientific failure, the religious essence, and the political ambitions of "intelligent design" creationism

Home Browse Books Book details, Creationism's Trojan Horse: The Wedge o.Creationism's Trojan Horse: The Wedge of Intelligent Design. By Barbara Forrest, Paul R. Forrest and Gross expose the scientific failure, the religious essence, and the political ambitions of "intelligent design" creationism. Analyzing the content and character of "intelligent design theory, " they highlight its threat to public education and to the separation of church and state.

by Barbara Forrest and Paul R. Published by Thriftbooks. com User, 11 years ago. Analyzing the content and character of "intelligent design theory," they highlight its threat to public education and to the separation of church and state.

Forrest and Gross expose the scientific failure, the religious essence, and the political ambitions of "intelligent design" creationism.

Barbara Forrest, Paul R.

Forrest and Gross expose the scientific failure, the religious essence, and the political ambitions of "intelligent design" creationism. They examine the movement's "Wedge Strategy," which has advanced and is succeeding through public relations rather than through scientific research. Analyzing the content and character of "intelligent design theory," they highlight its threat to public education and to the separation of church and state.
Comments: (7)
Delirium
The authors wrote in the Introduction to this 2005 book, "This book is about a current, national, intellectual seduction phenomenon... they are not actors, but executors of a real and serious political strategy. The 'audiences' ... consist of ... students, parents, teachers, public officials across ... the United States... people who don't, in most cases, know much about science... This book is about the newest form of creationism, named by its proponents 'intelligent design' (ID); but it is, especially, about the organization of the system of public and political relations that drives the movement. That system operates on a very detailed plan... named 'The Wedge' by its executors. It offers an upgraded form of the religious fundamentalist creationism long familiar in America." (Pg. 5-6)

They note, "By 1997, [Philip] Johnson was talking publicly about the Wedge strategy in his book Defeating Darwinism by Opening Minds... calling on the familiar metaphor of a splitting wedge employed to widen a small crack, which can then split a huge log... Johnson's 1998 book Objections Sustained is dedicated to 'the members of the Wedge, present and future.' One of his recent books is The Wedge of Truth..." (Pg. 22)

About the Michael Polanyi Center at Baylor University, they observe, "This undertaking has not, however, been altogether successful. The Polanyi Center as a self-contained research unit has been dissolved. [William] Dembski and [Bruce] Gordon can no longer act autonomously, as they once did... the MPC's demise as an independent research center was not a result of the objections of Baylor faculty, although a majority did indeed fear its effect on Baylor's reputation as a research university and implored President Sloan to dissolve it... Dembski was relieved of his duties as director of the Polanyi Center in October 2000." (Pg. 207-208)

They state, "Dembski sees an amalgam of intelligent design 'theory,' ... and his fervent evangelicalism... 'Indeed, intelligent design is just the Logos theology of John's Gospel restated in the idiom of information theory.' ... Statements such as these... betray the disingenuousness of Dembski's ... statement that 'design has no prior commitment to supernaturalism.'" (Pg. 260-261)

They point out, "other CRSC fellows make an explicit connection between their religiosity and their work for the Wedge. Jonathan Well's religious life ... has dictated his zealous anti-Darwinism. Wells... [who is] a devout member of Sun Myung Moon's Unification Church, obtained a Ph.D. in biology---AFTER earning a theology degree---IN ORDER to attack evolution. He explains... '[Moon's] words, my studies, and my prayers convinced me that I should devote my life to destroying Darwinism... When Father [Moon] chose me... I welcomed the opportunity to prepare myself for battle.'" (Pg. 263)

This book---which is absolutely FILLED with interesting "background" information about ID and its proponents---will be "must reading" for anyone concerned with the ID/Creationism/Evolution controversies.
Vozuru
Undoubtedly, this is a book that needed to be writen. In Creationism's Trojan Horse (CTH) Forrest and Gross attempt to show readers, via many angles, that Intelligent Design should not be allowed (and actively is not allowed) into the world of science. They do this not only by exposing the flawed, and woefully "mistake"-laden, works of those like Michael Behe and William Demski, but also by linking just about all major proponents of Intelligent Design to evangelical christian missions. If a person was only allowed to read one book to state the case against ID, this should be it.

The first chapters focus on the 'science' of the whole thing. One chapter, for instance, is devoted to Intelligent Design's very strange claim that the Cambrian Explosion should be causing a major problem to evoltionists. How can all of these forms just suddenly appear out of nowhere, the ID theorists ask? To ask this of course is to woefully misunderstand what is meant by "explosion." These forms did not suddenly appear, that is, unless by "suddenly" we mean over millions of years! Evolutionists have known this for quite some time, but it is news to the ID crea. And what about the absence of pre-Cambrian fossils? Not quite true, of course (and this is why evolutionists are not worried on this score, rather than ID's charge that it is a cover-up conspiracy.) The fossil record here is not as rich as would be liked, but it exists. These fossils not only didn't come from nowhere; any responsible - key word, that - should have known this.

We also get a thorough treatment on two of ID's stars - Michael Behe and William Dembski. The chapter on Behe shows us a man who simply seems rather oblivious to most critics. Forrest and Gross meticulously document the thorough rebuttals Behe has recieved and his thorough lack of response to these. Many of Behe's claims that certain organisms are irreducibly complex - that there is no way they could have evolved piece-by-piece - have shown false, and there is no reason to think that this trend will not continue. (To his credit, of course, he DOES make falsifiable predictions that just as often happen to be falsified, but at least that is somewhat scientific.) Dembski is given the same treatment. Though he is acknowledged to be more responsive to critics than Behe, we get to see some devastating criticisms (many by mathemeticians) of his work.

Perhaps the most damaging chapters, however, are those which show Intelligent Design to be the insignificant blip on the scientific radar that it is. As of Forrest and Gross's writing, not one peer-reviewed article had appeared in any scientific journal mentioning Intelligent Design theory as something other than a failed hypothesis. Only one of its books - one of Demski's - had been published by an academic press, and most had been published by InterVarsity prses (affiliated, of course, with the very sceince loving InterVarsity Christian Fellowship). Dembski, Behe and the others do most of their responding to critics (that are published in peer reviewed journals) on websites. (This is why Intelligent Design felt it necessary to create their own 'peer reviewed' journal.) (In 2004, there was an article supporting the design 'hypothesis' that appeared in a journal. It was nothing more than a literature review that was poorly cited and very swiftly critiqued by the scientific community.)

The latter chapters in the book offer meticulous proof and documentation that ID is a thinly veiled attempt to bring God back as a sceintific hypothesis. We are shown that according to the Wedge document (which the Discovery Institute reluctantly admits that they wrote) that ID aims at speaking to a Christian audience, which is, according to the document, their 'most natural' base. We are shown speech after speech after speech where a proponent of ID, when in the comfort of non-scientifically educated laypersons, proclaim the relationship between ID and the Christian God. As this book shows, ID theorists are caught in a bind - they need to drum up enthusaism to their 'natural' Christian base by selling the idea of ID as a defender of the Christian worldview while at the same time trying to convince science and the law that any association is coincidental. Avoid doing the one, and half of the support withers. Thus, they must engage in both and hope that neither side connects the dots.

Well, Forrest and Gross did connect the dots. At times - this is my only criticism - the book can seem like it engages too much in ad hominems; guilt by association. But the problem is that ID theorists opened the door to this by repeately asserting that they only 'happend to be christian,' and that ID was free of an agenda. As CTH shows, it certainly is not free of an agenda; its agenda is to fight for, and make room for, a christian worldview in a field of science that is actively making that harder and harder.

Well, one can do that in one's personal life, but when one is doing science, one neeeds to keep within the confines - yes, confines - of science. We cannot look for a supernatural cause in science, because to do so is to foray into an area not testable by empirical methods. (If we could not find a reason why a drug acted a certain way on a person, would be be able to make a hypothesis out of the 'miracle hypothesis'? No. Science looks for natural answers.

Anyway, read it. It is not a balanced, unbiased treatment. But anyone who says that Forrest and Gross are lying are themselves probably lying. This book is meticulous in its documentation and very careful to support all of its assertions. It would be a good model for ID to follow.
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