» » Laughter: A Theological Reflection

eBook Laughter: A Theological Reflection epub

by Karl-Josef Kuschel

eBook Laughter: A Theological Reflection epub
  • ISBN: 0334008670
  • Author: Karl-Josef Kuschel
  • Genre: Christians
  • Subcategory: Theology
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: SCM Press (April 26, 2012)
  • Pages: 174 pages
  • ePUB size: 1729 kb
  • FB2 size 1944 kb
  • Formats doc rtf mobi docx


A fine weaving of literature, biblical scholarship, and Christian theology.

Karl-Josef Kuschel’s most popular book is Laughter: A Theological Essay.

In this volume, theologian Kuschel traces a fascinating story of laughter: from Sarah in the Hebrew Bible through Homer, Plato, Aristotle, Mozart, Kafka, and Umberto Eco in The Name of the Rose. Kuschel discusses the foundations of Christian laughter in the New Testament and, in contrast, the Christian condemnation of laughter among the church fathers and in the monastic tradition.

Laughter: A Theological Reflection. Karl-Josef Kuschel, John Bowden. Anita Houck, "Laughter: A Theological Reflection. Karl-Josef Kuschel, John Bowden," The Journal of Religion 75, no. 4 (Oc. 1995): 589-591.

Reflexions on a Personal Literary.

A Theological Reflection, translated by John Bowden, London 1994 (SCM. Press) and New York 1994 (Continuum Publishing Company). Presence of God? Towards the possibility of a theological aesthetic in an analysis of. George Steiner. In: Literature and Theology 10 (1996), p. 1–19. Reflexions on a Personal Literary. In: E. Borgman – B. Philipsen – L. Verstricht (Ed., Literary Canons And.

A fine weaving of literature, biblical scholarship, and Christian theology.

6) Karl-Josef Kuschel and Stephen Halliwell cite abundant evidence of John Chrysostom's distaste for laughter .

6) Karl-Josef Kuschel and Stephen Halliwell cite abundant evidence of John Chrysostom's distaste for laughter as unbecoming of the true Christian. 7) Likewise, M. A. Screech points out that the highly influential work of Pseudo-Chrysostom, the Opus imperfectum in Matthaeum, contains strong condemnations of laughter. 8) This list could be greatly expanded. The theological importance of laughter is especially clear when Christ is its object, as when the wicked laughed at Christ the Head in his earthly life, and laugh at Christ the Body now; (10) or its agent, as when Christ the Head laughs from heaven at the wicked, and Christ the Body laughs at them on earth.

However, since laughter is such an important element in life, there would be something wrong if it could not be heard in theology: not mocking laughter, but the laughter which indicates delight and joy. And that such laughter cannot be heard today in the Roman Catholic church in its 'wintry season' is an important indication of its problems. The delight at the end of a joke is the result of a complex set of conditions and processes, and Cohen takes us through these conditions in a philosophical exploration of humor. Between heaven and mirth: Why joy, humor, and laughter are at the heart of the spiritual life.

Theology is not a subject especially noted for its jokes (though one of the chapters in this book has a good collection of them). However, since laughter is such an important element in life, there would be something wrong if it could not be heard in theology: not mocking laughter, but the laughter which indicates delight and joy. And that such laughter cannot be heard today in the Roman Catholic church in its 'wintry season' is an important indication of its problems. Dr Kuschel traces a fascinating story of laughter: from Sarah in the Hebrew Bible through Homer, Plato and Aristotle, Mozart and Kafka, to Umberto Eco and The Name of the Rose. There is a long chapter on Christian laughter and its foundations in the New Testament and there is a discussion of the Christian condemnation of laughter, among the church fathers and the monastic tradition. And sometimes laughter is out of place - a lesson which our modern world has not really learned. Jesus, from whom Christianity arose, was laughed at; and his followers have known what it is to be laughed at too. That recognition, too, is vital; one more strand in what proves to be the rich vein of new theological insights offered here. `How much underlies laughter! This is the kind of theology that we need: the world in all its heights and depths, everything clearly thought through, brilliantly written and at the same time centred on the Christian message' (Hans Kung). Karl-Josef Kuschel teaches ecumenical theology and theological aesthetics in the University of Tubingen.
eBooks Related to Laughter: A Theological Reflection
Contacts | Privacy Policy | DMCA
All rights reserved.
lycee-pablo-picasso.fr © 2016-2020