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eBook Fork It Over: The Intrepid Adventures of a Professional Eater epub

by Alan Richman

eBook Fork It Over: The Intrepid Adventures of a Professional Eater epub
  • ISBN: 006058629X
  • Author: Alan Richman
  • Genre: Cookbooks
  • Subcategory: Cooking Education & Reference
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: Harper; First Edition edition (October 26, 2004)
  • Pages: 336 pages
  • ePUB size: 1220 kb
  • FB2 size 1495 kb
  • Formats txt lit lrf mbr


Alan Richman's Fork It Over comes across as a naked attempt to cash in on the growing interest in food literature that started several years back

Alan Richman's Fork It Over comes across as a naked attempt to cash in on the growing interest in food literature that started several years back. For the most part, it's a collection of Richman's selected writings for various food publications from the early 90s to the mid noughties. The problem is, many of the articles haven't aged well over the years.

Fork It Over: The Intrepid Adventures of a Professional Eater. Alan Richman has dined in more unlikely locations and devoured more tasting menus than any other restaurant critic alive. All of this attests to his herculean constitution, and to his dedication to food writing. In Fork It Over, the eight-time winner of the James Beard Award retraces decades of culinary adventuring.

Alan Richman has dined in more unlikely locations and devoured more tasting menus than any other restaurant critic alive.

I consider Alan Richman the finest food writer out there and this book provides a sampling of the quality .

I consider Alan Richman the finest food writer out there and this book provides a sampling of the quality writing GQ and Bon Appetit readers have known for years. Fork It Over", Richman's first collection of stories, largely compiled from his years at "Gentleman's Quarterly", is so compelling, so vibrant, so funny, that it cannot help but leave you wanting more. And oh, is there more.

Other readers will always be interested in your opinion of the books you've read. and the man we both loved, Art Cooper. Whether you've loved the book or not, if you give your honest and detailed thoughts then people will find new books that are right for them. A M u s e - b o u C h e. The Eating Life, 3. A p p e t I z e r s.

Richman is the author of Fork It Over: The Intrepid Adventures of a Professional Eater

Richman is the author of Fork It Over: The Intrepid Adventures of a Professional Eater. Richman is the author of Fork It Over: The Intrepid Adventures of a Professional Eater - below are excerpts from the book: 10 Commandments for Diners.

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Alan Richman has dined inmore unlikely locations and devoured more tasting menus than any three other food critics combined.

Alan Richman has dined inmore unlikely locations and devoured more tasting menus than any three other food critics combined. Over the decades, his editors have complained incessantly about his expense accounts but never about his appetite. He has reviewed restaurants in all the best Communist countries (China, Vietnam, Cuba) and supped heartily all over the free world. Wherever he's gone, GQ magazine's acclaimed food, wine, and restaurant critic has brought along his impeccable palate, Herculean constitution, and biting humor.

In this globe-trotting literary smorgasbord, the eleven-time winner of the James Beard Foundation Award for food writing retraces his most savory culinary adventures. Richman's inexhaustible hunger and unquenchable curiosity take him to the best restaurants and most irresistible meals, from Monte Carlo to Corona, Queens. He seeks out the finest barbecue in America -- it's in Ayden, North Carolina, by the way -- the costliest sushi in Los Angeles, and the most perfumed black truffles in France. Along the way he has studied at Paul Bocuse's cooking school in Lyon (and failed), moonlighted as a sommelier in New York (and failed), and charmed his way through a candlelight dinner with actress Sharon Stone (and failed big time).

Through it all -- roughly 50,000 meals and still counting -- one thing is certain: Alan Richman has never come to a fork in the road without a fork in his hand.

Comments: (7)
Ynye
Alan Richman was one of the regular columnists who made Art Cooper's GQ such a great magazine, and I remember many of these articles from their first appearance at the turn of the millennium. They were a pleasure to read again, although they may be factually out of date.

Here is a sample of Mr. R's humor:

A joint has no high concept. It just is. It is a safe haven in a culinary world that swirls with inconsistencies. It is a respite from fast food, small food, tall food, and fancy food. Nothing is flambéed in a joint—except accidentally, should there be a grease fire. While the food in a joint is usually native-born American, the people who work in them are more likely to have been naturalized. English is always spoken, but not necessarily by the employee assigned the job of answering the telephone.

And here is some of his restaurant reviewing:

The maître d’ of the restaurant was continually trying to brighten my mood, announcing cheerily, “Very light today, only two courses.” Then out would come food on plates so large they appeared seaworthy. One of the “very light today” meals started with the signature dish of the restaurant: zucchini, turnips, fennel, carrots, and cabbage cooked with olive oil and black truffles. The baby vegetables in this assemblage were soft and impossibly succulent, bound up with the chopped truffles and olive oil. The dish was so savory I could imagine never needing meat again. It was also so oversize I could imagine never eating again. Next came veal, and never before had I tasted veal this tender and yet this flavorful, slice after slice of delicately pink loin, so many slices this was no mere dish of veal. This was a vista of veal, veal that seemed to go on forever, fading into the horizon, and surrounding the veal were spinach-flecked potato gnocchi in a black truffle sauce. Cerutti came out and applied the coup de grâce, shaving black truffles over the dish. I ate every bite of the best vegetables I’d ever had in my life, and then I ate every bite of the best veal I’d ever had in my life, and then I stumbled into the kitchen, barely able to remain upright.

Humor:

By selecting the eastern North Carolina sandwich as the beau ideal of barbecue, I was placing it above pork ribs and beef brisket, the industry favorites. I had no qualms about my commitment, for this sandwich is barbecue at its most sublime. I believe the reason it has never received proper acclaim is that it is little known outside the coastal regions of North Carolina, which are seldom visited, except by devastating hurricanes.

Food:

The tables had brown Formica tops, the chairs had brown vinyl seats, and the floor had brown-speckled tile. A couple of Rubbermaid Brute garbage cans stood in one corner. All these ambiance issues became immaterial the moment I bit into the sandwich. I couldn’t stop myself. I ate it so fast I had to go back and get another one right away. The pork was creamy and soft. The crunchy bits of skin were done just right, which meant they encompassed the yin and yang of barbecue, the crackle of carmelization and the ooze of fat. The vinegar was barely noticeable, and the presence of hot sauce was undetectable until it touched the back of my throat, leaving a tiny burn like the finish of a Napoleon Cognac. The coleslaw was fresh, elegant, and fine, containing a hint of mustard, so little that it seemed to influence the color more than the taste. I tried to eat my second sandwich slowly, but I gulped it, too, and I was too full to have a third.

Some of the cities Alan Richman eats his way through: Montreal, Havana, Shanghai, Saigon, Naples, the Hamptons.

Some topics to which he devotes an essay apiece (including some arduous research): Jewish waiters, sushi (he eats fugu, the fish of death), haggis, working as a sommelier, "My Beef with Vegans" (that title alone deserves a Pulitzer), truffles, and (one more quote), why he quite French cooking school:

The world of the pastry chef is alien to me. It is a place where French meringue and Italian meringue and Swiss meringue are all different, where a biscuit is not a biscuit, and where ice-cold cream poured into caramelized sugar will explode. Every preparation requires enormous amounts of time, effort, and meringue. And yet the pastry chef suffers like no other man. His delicacies are either thoughtlessly popped in the mouth, as though they were Chiclets, or refused by overstuffed diners who have gorged on a tasting menu and decided to skip dessert. My final pastry humiliation occurs when Chef Alain fires up a blowtorch and prepares to caramelize something. I failed shop when I was in junior high school and cannot imagine such a weapon in my hands.

Dare I say it? The book is a veritable feast.
Doomblade
I definitely recommend this book, there are hilarious stories that are also touching in the author's witty style of writing. It's a book that would be appreciated by those who like to critique their meals.
WUNDERKIND
Well written, funny and entertaining from front to back. Easy to read, somewhat short paragraphs and has a good pace. Well worth it.
Gamba
What a fun read!! My husband found me giggling at chapter after chapter. I enjoy reading this kind of book. I am interested in what really goes on in the Culinary world. I would sugest this book for anyone that likes this kind of book.
Grari
The first page elicited a chuckle and I henceforth forked, spooned and devoured Richman's delightfully engaging and profoundly informative book; an amalgamation of previously published columns that have appeared in GQ, Bon Apetit, and Food & Wine magazines. I was afraid his wry wit would be the book's undoing, but like the black truffles he extols, it served to elevate his food critical narratives from the banal to the sublime. Biased by chef challenge television, I naively thought that only celebrity chefs were consummately qualified to critique the food of other chefs. Richman not only doesn't cook, he's never worked in the food service industry. Perfectly portioned, Richman "forks over" appetizers consisting of mom's ritualistic cooking to "gratuity," dinner with Sharon Stone. Pure indulgence in all the courses in between!
Asher
I enjoyed this book so much i've reread it several times. Not only is the novelty of his journey in search of food enjoyable, but Richman's personal style adds so much to the narrative; you feel like you're with him while he tells the tales. I'm not sure which essay was my favourite, but i found myself nodding my head so many times in agreement my neck hurts. If you're a well traveled foodie of a certain age you will probably love this book...and even if you aren't, it's bound to be enoyable on some level. And Mr. Richman, if you ever care to enjoy dinner with a real woman who knows what they're in a good restaurant for..... one who wants to talk about the menu, can eat course for course right along with you, and keep the conversation focused on food and wine, give me a call. I wish there were another volume to look forward to.
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