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eBook The Feast Nearby: How I lost my job, buried a marriage, and found my way by keeping chickens, foraging, preserving, bartering, and eating locally (all on $40 a week) epub

by Robin Mather

eBook The Feast Nearby: How I lost my job, buried a marriage, and found my way by keeping chickens, foraging, preserving, bartering, and eating locally (all on $40 a week) epub
  • ISBN: 158008558X
  • Author: Robin Mather
  • Genre: Cookbooks
  • Subcategory: Cooking Methods
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: Ten Speed Press; All on $40 a Week edition (May 24, 2011)
  • Pages: 272 pages
  • ePUB size: 1836 kb
  • FB2 size 1137 kb
  • Formats docx doc lit mbr


Within a single week in 2009, food journalist Robin Mather found herself on the . I thought this book would provide interesting tips on eating locally, which it does, but most of all, I love Robin's conversational tone

Within a single week in 2009, food journalist Robin Mather found herself on the threshold of a divorce and laid off from her job at the Chicago Tribune. Forced into a radical life change. by. Robin Mather (Author). I thought this book would provide interesting tips on eating locally, which it does, but most of all, I love Robin's conversational tone. I can relate to much of what she says, since I was also born & raised in Michigan.

The Feast Nearby book. Within a single week in 2009, food journalist Robin Mather found.

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The Feast Nearby - I DEVOURED this book - canning - locavore - eating on a budget - Robin Mather is talented. If you want a great book with good information and recipes I wholeheartedly recommend this book. Baked Acorn Squash with Sausage and Maple Syrup // The Feast Nearby. The Feast Nearby celebrates small pleasures: home-roasted coffee, a pantry stocked with home-canned green beans and homemade preserves, and the contented clucking of laying hens in the backyard.

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The Feast Nearby - Robin Mather.

Read unlimited books and audiobooks on the web, iPad, iPhone and Android. Within a single week in 2009, food journalist Robin Mather found herself on the threshold of a divorce and laid off from her job at the Chicago Tribune. Forced into a radical life change, she returned to her native rural Michigan. There she learned to live on a limited budget while remaining true to her culinary principles of eating well and as locally as possible. The Feast Nearby - Robin Mather.

Author: Robin Mather. Past Forgetting: My Memory Lost and Found. Past Forgetting My Memory Lost and Found Jill Robinson FOR STUART SHAW I’ll see you again. Whenever Spring breaks.

Home Ten Speed Press The Feast Nearby: How I lost my job . AbeBooks has millions of books.

Home Ten Speed Press The Feast Nearby: How I lost my job, buried a marriage, and. Published by Ten Speed Press, 2004. View all copies of this book. Description: Ships with Tracking Number!

About book: This is part cookbook, part memoir of a woman who lost her job and her .

About book: This is part cookbook, part memoir of a woman who lost her job and her husband, and had to move to a lakehouse in southwest Michigan (local for m. She made a commitment to eat locally as much as possible, and for obvious reasons had to economize, so she explains how to preserve and what she preserved. At the end of each chapter are recipes for the things she made. But Mather doesn't garden, eats a lot of meat, and relies on lots of processed (sugar/flour) products for her diet, so I couldn't really say she was any different from a person living in a condo in the city, but that she had some hens and a good view of the lake.

Within a single week in 2009, food journalist Robin Mather found herself on the threshold of a divorce and laid off from her job at the Chicago Tribune. Forced into a radical life change, she returned to her native rural Michigan.  There she learned to live on a limited budget while remaining true to her culinary principles of eating well and as locally as possible. In The Feast Nearby, Mather chronicles her year-long project: preparing and consuming three home-cooked, totally seasonal, and local meals a day--all on forty dollars a week.  With insight and humor, Mather explores the confusion and needful compromises in eating locally. She examines why local often trumps organic, and wonders why the USDA recommends white bread, powdered milk, and instant orange drinks as part of its “low-cost” food budget program.  Through local eating, Mather forges connections with the farmers, vendors, and growers who provide her with sustenance. She becomes more closely attuned to the nuances of each season, inhabiting her little corner of the world more fully, and building a life richer than she imagined it could be.  The Feast Nearby celebrates small pleasures: home-roasted coffee, a pantry stocked with home-canned green beans and homemade preserves, and the contented clucking of laying hens in the backyard. Mather also draws on her rich culinary knowledge to present nearly one hundred seasonal recipes that are inspiring, enticing, and economical--cooking goals that don’t always overlap--such as Pickled Asparagus with Lemon, Tarragon, and Garlic; Cider-Braised Pork Loin with Apples and Onions; and Cardamom-Coffee Toffee Bars.  Mather’s poignant, reflective narrative shares encouraging advice for aspiring locavores everywhere, and combines the virtues of kitchen thrift with the pleasures of cooking--and eating--well.

Comments: (7)
Bad Sunny
I just finished this book after receiving it the day after it was released, and my only complaint is that it wasn't longer! I would love to linger with this author a while more. Ms. Mather's story was moving and inspiring, and I really finished feeling that I could move towards a goal of buying my food more sustainably using the book as a guide. Along with the autobiographical essays, there are delicious sounding recipes (I can't wait to start making them!) and practical wisdom offered about how to put food by in more unusual ways than the strawberry jam we're all used to (although there is a a recipe for strawberry jam as well). I also love that the author's tone was not at all self-congratulatory; rather, the author reminds us that this is actually the way people used to live, in a time before huge supermarkets where out of season produce is available year round and when people were more resourceful.
Berkohi
I enjoyed this book, though the second half was better than the first. Robin Mather came across as a lovely person, charming and simple. Not simple as in simple-minded, but simple as in able to recognize, appreciate, and enjoy life’s small pleasures. She didn’t seem a bit judgmental. But perhaps most impressive was that she didn’t come across as a bit whiny.

Other reviewers have commented that they wished she wrote more about her experience with losing a job and a marriage in the same week. I initially felt the same way, but when I thought about it further, writing about divorce and job loss would most likely have turned a delightful book into a gloomy one. Mather’s determination to focus on what she had, rather than what she lacked, was a wise decision.

But I do agree that the book felt a bit too impersonal at times. Mather would often open a chapter with something non-food related: watching a sunrise, watching a firefly outside her bedroom window, entertaining houseguests, making a trip into town. She would then segue into a discussion of a particular food or type of food: how to preserve it, ways to cook it, and all kinds of interesting facts about the food. But often, I felt the writing could have been improved if she hadn’t focused quite so much of her time on talking about the food. She has a charming narrative voice that comes out more clearly when talking about personal experiences.
Rit
I really enjoyed this book. Many of the recipes were very appealing and I intend on trying them. I read the book this summer and it inspired me to be really diligent about taking advantage of fresh, local produce when it is at its peak. Ms. Mather has an engaging writing style, and I often felt while reading the book that I was at her cozy lakeside cottage in Michigan along with her beloved poodle and parrot. If you are a food lover and like reading foodie-related memoirs, add this to your reading list.
Uanabimo
I love this book! I thought this book would provide interesting tips on eating locally, which it does, but most of all, I love Robin's conversational tone. I can relate to much of what she says, since I was also born & raised in Michigan. I love how she describes her neighbor Wally, "I looked at that kind man, his legs still spattered with grass clippings from cutting my grass, and said, 'Just a second.' I hopped downstairs and returned with two squat half-pint jars of strawberry preserves under paraffin . . . Wally's always busy, I've noticed. He makes me think of a bumble bee, with lots of stops to make every day to make sure everyone is happily pollinated with Wally dust." She then describes and includes a pattern for a knitted double-layer hat that she makes for Wally, although most of the book is full of recipes, including recipes for jam. I haven't canned anything since helping my mom years ago when we were kids, but Robin's book has inspired me to try it again. She discusses simple country joys, such as acquiring a kitten, gathering eggs from her hens, her small dish herb garden on her patio, hot summer days, and picking wild raspberries. Her recipes make my mouth water.

Robin is re-inventing herself after loss of a marriage & loss of her job, but there is not one word of bitterness, only healing and going on with a simpler life. I think her sense of acceptance of life and lack of bitterness is what struck me most. Many adults these days spend years being single, whether before or after marriages/relationships, so most of us can relate. I also appreciated that her move to simpler living was inspired by economics and neighborliness, and that in her book she is apolitical, which is refreshing in itself these days. Most of all, when I read her book, I feel relaxed and peaceful, as well as inspired to try some of these recipes from local food, and that Robin would make a delightful person to know.

My one regret is that I bought this book for my Kindle, and I wish I had bought it hardcover instead. Kindle seems to work better for reading stories than for perusing cookbooks and recipes -- although I don't have a Kindle Fire yet, so it might be easier to read on that.

Enjoy your visit with neighbor Robin as you read this book! Robin, feel free to write another. :)
kolos
I purchased this years ago as I was a fan of Robin's writing in the Detroit News and her column in Homestyle on Satudays. This book is a memoir, a guide to eating local, an emotional survival guide and a love story of rural Michigan plus there are recipes. I bought this book for the Fire Chief in Thornapple Township and he knew a couple of the farmers; he was impressed and passed the book through his family. I recommend this book for those of us who love eating local and to read about food and sustainability.
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