» » Class Rules: Exposing Inequality in American High Schools (Multicultural Education Series)

eBook Class Rules: Exposing Inequality in American High Schools (Multicultural Education Series) epub

by James A. Banks,Peter W. Cookson

eBook Class Rules: Exposing Inequality in American High Schools (Multicultural Education Series) epub
  • ISBN: 0807754528
  • Author: James A. Banks,Peter W. Cookson
  • Genre: Education
  • Subcategory: Schools & Teaching
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: Teachers College Press (August 25, 2013)
  • Pages: 160 pages
  • ePUB size: 1634 kb
  • FB2 size 1845 kb
  • Formats azw mbr lrf doc


Class Rules challenges the popular myth that high schools are the great equalizers. This highly readable and original book illuminates why we don’t have open class warfare in our society, despite huge inequalities.

Class Rules challenges the popular myth that high schools are the great equalizers. In his groundbreaking study. Peter Cookson humanizes the abstract concept of social class, showing how schools reproduce classes through institutional practices that forge class-based consciousness. Caroline Hodges Persell, professor emerita of sociology, New York University. From the Inside Flap. Class Rules challenges the popular myth that high schools are the "Great Equalizers".

Peter Cookson shows how schools reproduce classes through .

Peter Cookson shows how schools reproduce classes through institutional practices that forge class-based consciousness. Cookson does a superb job of analyzing the powerful forces in our schools that reinforce the racial, ethnic, and social-class structures our nation hopes to overcome. Breaking out of one’s social class was always hard but may now be harder than in previous decades.

Peter W. Cookson, Jr. is the author or co-author of over fifteen books about social inequality, education and the American upper class

Peter W. is the author or co-author of over fifteen books about social inequality, education and the American upper class. Currently, he is managing director of Education Sector in Washington, . and teaches at Teachers College, Columbia University and Georgetown University.

Class Rules: Exposing Inequality in American High Schools. Class Rules - Peter W. Cookson. Multicultural education series. Cookson reminds us of what high schools can be, the great equalizers, institutions for promoting America’s finest values. In his groundbreaking study, Cookson demonstrates that adolescents undergo different class rites of passage depending on the social-class composition of the high school they attend. Drawing on stories of schools and individual students, the author shows that where a student goes to high school is a major influence on his or her social class trajectory.

Class Rules challenges the popular myth that high schools are the "great equalizers. Drawing on stories of schools and individual students, the author shows that where a student goes to high school is a major influence on his or her social-class trajectory.

New Book by Peter W. Examines the Powerful Effects of Social Class on Education - PR12204641. Cookson documents how high schools create enduring inequality through their socialization processes. He compares the cultures and curricula of five high schools that have contrasting social class compositions: an elite boarding school and public schools in a wealthy suburb, a middle-class neighborhood, a working-class rural community, and a low-income urban community. He describes how the structure, rites of passage, and class consciousness in each school reproduce social-class inequality.

Multicultural Education Series, a series of books published by Teachers College . Class Rules: Exposing Inequality in American High Schools.

Multicultural Education Series, a series of books published by Teachers College Press, Columbia University. Christine E. Sleeter and Miguel Zavala. Just Schools: Building Equitable Collaborations With Families and Communities.

Multicultural Education. Multicultural Education.

Peter W Cookson, Michael F Graves, James A Banks. Drawing on stories of schools and individual students, the author shows that where a student goes to high school is a major influence on his or her social class trajectory

Class Rules challenges the popular myth that high schools are the “great equalizers.” In his groundbreaking study, Cookson demonstrates that adolescents undergo different class rites of passage depending on the social-class composition of the high school they attend. Drawing on stories of schools and individual students, the author shows that where a student goes to high school is a major influence on his or her social-class trajectory. Class Rules is a penetrating, original examination of the role education plays in blocking upward mobility for many children. It offers a compelling vision of an equitable system of schools based on the full democratic rights of students.

Book Features:

Provides a fresh, dynamic way of understanding educational inequality and social reproduction. Offers a breakthrough social/psychological theory of how adolescents acquire class consciousness. Compares the cultures and curricula of five American high schools, focusing on the class composition of their students.
Comments: (3)
Ziena
I finished reading this book a few days after the Clinton's welcomed their new grandchild into the world and thought, what different worlds this new grandchild and those just born into working class/poor households will walk in. So much is made of the principles of equality in our national documents, and yet, the reality of where children start their lives in this country paints a very different definition of equality and opportunity. Although this book does not add much to the ground breaking books on the outcomes and pedagogies of class based schooling authored by Jean Anyon, Class Rules is stark reminder, told by students in these schools, of how the trajectory of our lives is largely determined by our zip codes. Having spend my entire career teaching, administering, and writing about teaching and learning, I would take issue with the idea that the quality of teaching or for that matter, the quality of the curriculum, is much different in these schools --- uninspired teaching and meaningless curricular, as John Goodlad pointed out years ago, is baked into all schools in this country, no matter where they are located. What differences are significant in the schools described by Mr. Cookson, and Anyon, is who sits next to you in these classrooms. The expectations, behaviors, goals, and networks of the classmates in a school that the Clinton's grandchild will attend are on a different planet than what a child will face who is born in the South Bronx. I would add that "Class Rules" blows up the myth that "no excuses" charter schools or the adoption of world class standards will change the life trajectories of students born in South Bronx. No, schools are not the answer to all social ills that face us in so many urban areas. The real answer, which politicians of both parties have skillfully taken off the table, is kind of social, political, and economic policies that would close the widening wealth and job gap in this country ---- after that, then we can start talking about racing to the top.
Brol
The book isn't elaborate, and the musings and theorizing at the beginning and end aren't too much to get excited about, but the five chapters in the middle are worth it. Each chapter describes the environment--physical, cultural, managerial, community--at five different (actual) high schools, from creme de la creme to a very high poverty neighborhood in the Bronx. The author's descriptions are spot on, and altogether paint a compelling picture of the different worlds students in each school inhabit, and how those worlds set them up for their future lives and careers.
Duzshura
Peter Cookson gives reasons why the “classroom as equalizer” idea is a myth. The middle class child goes to a good, spacious school. with good teachers and connections to good colleges. The inner city working class child, however, goes to a cramped, crowded, underfunded, and poorly managed school with no connections to good colleges. The college counselor only hands out applications, and there’s little guidance.

As a former high schools students from a suburban high school I could easily see the difference when I entered an urban school. The difference was in the deference; there was little respect for the teachers or the school, and absolutely no motivation. The middle class suburban youth has college and money on his mind, while the inner city youth doesn’t seem to want to go to school. Most of my classmates went to private colleges or the best public ones, and their parents could afford to pay. My students were accepted into a variety of colleges, some public, some private. But many of them flunked out in the first year because of low skills.

Despite the validity of Cookson’s arguments, I do not agree with all of his points. In New York City, the teachers come from a variety of backgrounds, including public and private colleges. Yet the teachers in the public schools are paid equally regardless of what college they attended, same thing with the police department, corrections, health & hospitals. Cookson’s proofs consist of the Highridge boarding school versus Patrick Henry High School, both in a working class town. The private school is a doorway to great futures, but the local high school has teen pregnancy, drug use, and general failure on all levels. But what is there to stop a poor kid from taking lots of science classes, joining the military, learning a specialty, leaving after a few years, going to college on the GI Bill?

Those of us who read The Other Wes Moore might be convinced that Wes Moore was “saved” by the Valley Forge Military Academy, but I’m not. He was, by his own admittance, a poor academic, and his C average would NOT have gotten him into West Point. Yet he was able to get and officer’s commission anyway just by having a four year college degree. Most parents can’t afford to send their kids to a great military school, but can they even afford to live in a neighborhood with no bad influences?
In the Highridge versus Patrick Henry comparison, the only difference I see is motivation. The townies seem to lack any ambition or initiative whatsoever. I can understand a kid not wanting to go to college, some kids are more physical. If a kid says that she wants to be a chef, mechanic, soldier, sailor, I say that’s wonderful. But the kids in the working class school don’t even seem to want that.

No matter what the author’s point here, I think that the real problem, according to his evidence, is a general suspicion towards academics. If the parents do not want to listen to the people that are trying to help their kids, then what do they expect to get? Why send your kid to high school if you don’t care what happens to them?
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