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eBook Understanding the Digital Generation: Teaching and Learning in the New Digital Landscape (The 21st Century Fluency Series) epub

by Ted McCain,Lee Crockett,Mark Prensky,Ian Jukes

eBook Understanding the Digital Generation: Teaching and Learning in the New Digital Landscape (The 21st Century Fluency Series) epub
  • ISBN: 1412938449
  • Author: Ted McCain,Lee Crockett,Mark Prensky,Ian Jukes
  • Genre: Education
  • Subcategory: Schools & Teaching
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: Corwin; New edition edition (February 11, 2010)
  • Pages: 176 pages
  • ePUB size: 1370 kb
  • FB2 size 1780 kb
  • Formats mbr doc lit lrf


In Understanding the Digital Generation, Jukes, McCain, and Crockett fully deliver on their goal of providing a greater understanding of the . A book that captures what real learning is all about. Thank you Ian, Ted, and Lee for sharing your knowledge and casting new insight on digital kids.

In Understanding the Digital Generation, Jukes, McCain, and Crockett fully deliver on their goal of providing a greater understanding of the digital generation and sparking . .deep thinking about how instruction should change to teach them effectively. Author: Brian Celli, Superintendent/CEO Published On: 2010-01-05. A must-read for every teacher, teaching in this modern, high-tech, digital online world.

Understanding the Digital Generation describes implementing educational approaches that build critical thinking skills .

Understanding the Digital Generation describes implementing educational approaches that build critical thinking skills, and discusses the role of digital media and technology used by students and how that fosters the crucial development of new 21st-century fluency skills. Over the past 10 years, Jukes has worked with clients in more than 40 countries and made more than 7,000 presentations, typically speaking to between 300,000 and 350,000 people a year. His Committed Sardine Blog is read by more than 78,000 people in 75 countries. Ted McCain is coordinator of instructional technology for Maple Ridge Secondary School in Vancouver, BC.

Jukes, McCain, and Crockett have laid out an excellent road map for learning in the 21st century. Readers will have clearer understanding of this digital generation and why our classrooms continue to teach analog students in a digital world. -James Cisek, CEO/President (01/05/2010)". This book dramatically documents the need for educators to recognize that 21st-century learners do not learn like their predecessors.

Teaching and Learning in the New Digital Landscape. Author, Teaching the Digital Generation

Teaching and Learning in the New Digital Landscape. Ian Jukes - The InfoSavvy21 Group. Jukes, McCain, and Crockett have laid out an excellent road map for learning in the 21st century. James Cisek, CEO/President. Author, Teaching the Digital Generation. This book explores critical questions that intrigue today’s educational leaders: How do I balance the best of the past with the opportunities and realities of the present? How do I balance all that I know with all that we are becoming?

Understanding the Digital Generation book .

Understanding the Digital Generation book. The basic premise of this and most of the 21st century literacy series books is that kids today learn differently because of what the digital age has done to them. Instead of wallowing in self pity and saying "We're losing the kids!" this book takes the opposite approach, one I whole-heartedly agree with. It was interesting to learn how the Digital Generation (which includes my own generation) has changed the way they view education and how teachers need to modify their instruction to reach these learners.

In their new book, Jukes, McCain, and Crockett have broken new ground. While focusing on 21st-century skills-what they are now and will be in the future-this group has laid important groundwork for lifting our thinking into the 21st century. As they so aptly point out, we cannot correctly identify the skills for the 21st century with thinking still grounded in the 20th century. Jukes, McCain, and Crockett challenge our thinking first and then lead us to what is important for our students to be able to do in this new century.

Marc Prensky, Ian Jukes, Ted McCain.

Educating the digital generation: Exploring media literacy for the 21st . Born digital: Understanding the first generation of digital natives. New York: Basic Books.

Educating the digital generation: Exploring media literacy for the 21st century. Nordic Journal of Digital Literacy, 5(1), 56–72. Hargittai, E. (2010). Digital na(t)ives? Variation in Internet skills and uses among members of the Net Generation. Sociological Inquiry, 80(1), 92–113. CrossRefGoogle Scholar. Helsper, E. & Eynon, R. Understanding the digital generation: Teaching and learning in the new digital landscape. Vancouver, BC, Canada: Corwin. Lenhart, A. (2015, April).

the Digital Generation By Ian Jukes, Ted McCain and Lee Crockett; 2010.

Understanding the digital generation: Teaching and learning in the new digital landscape 21st Century Fluency .

Understanding the digital generation: Teaching and learning in the new digital landscape 21st Century Fluency Project. Jukes, . McCain, . & Crocket, L. (2010b). Termed 'digital natives' or the 'Net generation', these young people are said to have been immersed in technology all their lives, imbuing them with sophisticated technical skills and learning preferences for which traditional education is unprepared.

An innovative look at reshaping the educational experiences of 21st-century learners!

Inspiring thoughtful discussion that leads to change, this reader-friendly resource examines how the new digital landscape is transforming teaching and learning in an environment of standards, accountability, and high-stakes testing and why informed leadership is so critical. The authors present powerful strategies and compelling viewpoints, underscore the necessity of developing relevant classroom experiences, and discuss:

Attributes common among digital learners The concepts of neuroplasticity and the hyperlinked mind An educational approach that supports traditional literacy skills alongside 21st-century fluencies Evaluation methods that encompass how digital generation students process new information
Comments: (7)
Bludworm
I'd recommend this for any educator who is baffled why the most recent batch of students seems to not be learning the way they used to. This book does NOT say that children have no need to read or learn science or learn history. It says the opposite. All of tho subjects are still in great need, but how we present that information to the students is critical.

The reason for 4 stars is for two reasons 1. Using terms from a previous book without explaining them 2. Taking too long in the first few chapters to get to the point.

Throughout the Book they use the term "hyperlinked information" without giving a good explanation or example of what they meant by it. I can only assume it's from the previous book in the series "Living on the Future Edge." Similarly I think that many practical techniques are left for the following books "The Digital Diet" and "Teaching for Tomorrow."

Second, much of the introduction seemed tone repetitive and I just wanted to scream "stop saying teachers like me don't know the benefit of digital learning and just tell me the benefit!"

And some final food for thought: They say video games build problem solving and perseverance, but what about cheat codes? Many of my students would either give up or look for some way to cheat their way around a difficult problem. They also don't mention economically disadvantaged students. Is there research on whether or not they are also picking up these modes of thinking even though they havenot been exposed to the same kind of technology?

Overall a good book with a fresh perspective.
Balladolbine
Jukes builds a foundation to understand the technological and social forces that have shaped how younger generations have learned to interact with their world and with each other. His strong conviction is that present models for education are more comfortable for educators than learners-- and he encourages teachers to enter the world of the learner and see the possibilities for new modes of learning together.
Nafyn
Outstanding text for understanding the way our students think today. Easy read.
Zeleence
This book opens one's eyes to the learning behaviors of the current generation of "digital natives" and how to best address their needs as educators.
Maucage
The book shares great points of view worthy of discussing, but repeats its point over and over. The kindle version has minor erros, but they don't compromise the comprehension.
Felhalar
It gives me a realistic view about the millennials and why they act the way they do in and out of classroom.
Adaly
In my estimation and experience, the use of digital tools and new media in education disrupts the status quo precisely at the point where the disturbance caused outstrips practitioners' understanding, patience and expected levels of control. The contemporary teacher's lament, "I want my students to listen to me but their use of digital technology takes that away" indicates--if nothing else--a pedagogical bleakness requiring urgent remediation. But why? And what can be done by teachers acting individually or in unison?

In "Understanding the digital generation: Teaching and learning in the new digital landscape" (Corwin, 2010) authors Jukes, McCain and Crockett attempt to make the conceptual case for changing current instructional practices in schools given the unprecedented and unrelenting developments surrounding the so-called "digital generation". The argument put forward is in two parts and, in my opinion, relies on the reader's acceptance of a series of popular and rarely questioned sentiments and notions about schooling, worklife and digital technology use.

Part I rehearses a familiar, multifaceted set of concerns that is easily summarised. There is a growing gap between the life experience of kids today and, their parents and teachers. Today's children take access to digital tools and media for granted; they expect, want, and need interactive information. Further, the digital world is changing the way these kids see and think--they have developed "hypertext" and "hyperlinked" minds that are easily and incredibly bored by most of today's education. The upshot? As today's learners sit impatiently unengaged or under engaged in teacher-centric, analogue classrooms, education is suffering a crisis of relevance. And before matters get any worse, teachers and parents must act differently and distinctly to change their antiquated mindsets.

Part II of the book is slightly more practice oriented in its presentation and discussion of how educators should respond to the "digital student" onslaught. Fortunately and crucially, an early point made (lest, I would contend, despair has set in after Part I) is that "teachers have some very important cognitive skills to teach young people that are critical for success in the very digital world students live in" (p. 48) and have a vital leadership role to play. However, there are some equally significant (and far-reaching) conditions that need to be met before this teaching and learning can happen. In short, teachers must desist from telling students what and how to learn and shift to problem- and project-based, "whole-mind" instruction. They must also let students access information "natively" (i.e. let them use new tools and media in ways they've developed, know and understand best) and work collaboratively. Teachers must also teach students visually and re-evaluate evaluation in order for instructional practices to change. These ideas, as one can readily appreciate, are major paradigm shifters that "will draw the ire of those who are unwilling to embrace change in their role[s]" (p. 135) and partially work "against the grain with students as well" (p. 135).

As a conceptual piece this book deserves to be critiqued on its own terms. Overall, I found the treatment of the subject-matter to be largely propositional (only to be expected), normative and under-theorized. What is required (as with other books of its kind) is a theory of learning that accounts for the experiential and experimental notions and practices advocated. It would also be useful to know the bases for the teacher learning required, in context (what kind of agency do teachers need? And how could it be exercised under present systemic circumstances?). But I must be careful not to overstep the mark as this is not a book that is really meant for me--a British educational researcher who is a permanent resident in Singapore. Rather, it's a book squarely written by North Americans for North Americans and the rest of the "digital world" is treated rather curiously and sparingly I have to say.

Laying conceptual foundations is inherently epistemological, contestable and fleeting work. I'm hoping for tighter, critical, more inclusive and grounded material from the authors and their 21st Century Fluency Project.
This book came exactly as ordered, looks to be new even thought the product said "like new" . Came right as estimated and I am satisfied.
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