» » Compacted Oxide Layer Formation under Conditions of Limited Debris Retention at the Wear Interface during High Temperature Sliding Wear of Superalloys

eBook Compacted Oxide Layer Formation under Conditions of Limited Debris Retention at the Wear Interface during High Temperature Sliding Wear of Superalloys epub

by Ian A. Inman

eBook Compacted Oxide Layer Formation under Conditions of Limited Debris Retention at the Wear Interface during High Temperature Sliding Wear of Superalloys epub
  • ISBN: 1581123213
  • Author: Ian A. Inman
  • Genre: Engineering
  • Subcategory: Automotive
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: Dissertation.Com. (June 12, 2006)
  • Pages: 372 pages
  • ePUB size: 1476 kb
  • FB2 size 1477 kb
  • Formats azw lit lrf docx


High-Temperature Friction and Wear Studies of Nimonic 80A and Nimonic 90 Against Nimonic 75 Under Dry Sliding .

High-Temperature Friction and Wear Studies of Nimonic 80A and Nimonic 90 Against Nimonic 75 Under Dry Sliding Conditions. The variation in behaviour during sliding wear of Nimonic 80A against Stellite 6 (counterface) at 630 °C, 690 °C and 750 °C and sliding speeds of . 14 m s−1, . 05 m s−1, . 85 m s−1, . 54 m s−1 and . 05 m s−1, was investigated. A ‘block-on-cylinder’ configuration was used such that debris retention was not encouraged. At . 14 m s−1, mild oxidational wear was observed at all three temperatures, due to transfer and oxidation of Stellite 6-sourced debris to the Nimonic 80A.

One phenomenon that has been observed to reduce metallic contact and thus high temperature wear and friction is the formation of what are termed ‘glazes’, essentially layers of compacted oxide wear debris that becomes sintered together to form a low friction wear resistant oxide surface. This thesis studies the nature of the wear encountered with four different combinations of Superalloys, slid together using a ‘block-on-cylinder’ configuration developed for accelerated simulation testing of car engine ‘valve-on-valve-seat’ wear.

However, one high temperature phenomenon observed to reduce metallic contact, and thus wear and friction, is the formation of ‘glazes’,essentially compacted oxide wear debris layers that sinter together to form wear resistant surfaces. This thesis studies the nature of wear encountered with four different combinations of Superalloys, slid together using a ‘block-on-cylinder’ configuration (Nimonic 80A and Incoloy MA956 as block, sample materials; Stellite 6 and Incoloy 800HT as cylinder, counterface materials) simulating car (automobile) engine ‘valve-on-valve-seat’ wear.

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Inman, Ian (2004) Compacted oxide layer formation under conditions of. .

Inman, Ian (2004) Compacted oxide layer formation under conditions of limited debris retention at the wear interface during high temperature sliding wear of superalloys. Doctoral thesis, Northumbria University. Predominantly, Nimonic 80A and Incoloy MA956 were used as sample materials and Stellite 6 and Incoloy 800HT were used as counterface materials. Item Type: Thesis (Doctoral).

Compacted Oxide Layer Formation under Conditions of Limited Debris Retention at the Wear Interface during High Temperature Sliding Wear of Superalloys, P. Thesis (2003), Northumbria University

Compacted Oxide Layer Formation under Conditions of Limited Debris Retention at the Wear Interface during High Temperature Sliding Wear of Superalloys, P. Rose – Studies of the High Temperature Tribological Behaviour of Superalloys, P. Thesis, AMRI, Northumbria University (2000). Wood – The Effect of the Counterface on the Wear Resistance of Certain Alloys at Room Temperature and 750°C, P. Thesis, SERG, Northumbria University (1997).

Retention at the wear interface during high temperature sliding wear of superalloys. Effectiveness of wear reduction on S45C plain carbon steel due to the introduction of Fe2O3 particles.

Compacted oxide layer formation under conditions of limited debris retention at the wear interface during high temperature sliding wear of superalloys. 32. Figure . 4: Mechanisms of possible movement of particles during sliding of particulate materials. 37. 5: Variation of coefficient of friction and wear rate of Fe . %Cr with oxygen partial pressure during like on like sliding at 20°C. PhD thesis, Northumbria University, UK (2003) published by Dissertation. Luo, . Microscopy of glazed layers formed during high temperature sliding wear at 750 C. Wear 254, 461–467 (2003).

Author: Ian A Inman Number of Pages: 372 pages Published Date: 30 Jun 2006 Publisher: DISSERTATION.

For many applications, including power generation, aerospace and the automobile industry, high temperature wear provides serious difficulties where two or more surfaces move or slide relative to one another. In aerospace, for example, demands for more powerful, efficient engines operating at ever higher temperatures, mean that conventional lubrication is no longer sufficient to prevent direct contact between metallic sliding surfaces, accelerating wear. However, one high temperature phenomenon observed to reduce metallic contact, and thus wear and friction, is the formation of 'glazes',essentially compacted oxide wear debris layers that sinter together to form wear resistant surfaces. This thesis studies the nature of wear encountered with four different combinations of Superalloys, slid together using a 'block-on-cylinder' configuration (Nimonic 80A and Incoloy MA956 as block / sample materials; Stellite 6 and Incoloy 800HT as cylinder / counterface materials) simulating car (automobile) engine 'valve-on-valve-seat' wear. Initially this study concentrates on the combined effects of sliding speed (either 0.314 m/s or 0.905 m/s, supplementing previous testing at 0.654 m/s) and temperature (between room temperature and 750°C) - by altering either or both of these variables, the nature of the wear process can be radically altered, encouraging or suppressing wear protective oxide or 'glaze' layer formation. Extensive characterisation is conducted of the 'glaze' layers during this study, using a wide range of tools including optical microscopy, SEM, EDX (spot, mapping and Autopoint), XRD (including Glancing Angle) and micro-hardness. On selected samples, TEM and STM show these 'glaze' layers to be nano-structured (nano-crystalline), with an estimated grain size of as little as 2 to 10 nm.
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