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eBook Executive Architect epub

by John E. Harrigan

eBook Executive Architect epub
  • ISBN: 0471113522
  • Author: John E. Harrigan
  • Genre: Engineering
  • Subcategory: Engineering
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: John Wiley & Sons; 1 edition (March 27, 1996)
  • Pages: 384 pages
  • ePUB size: 1958 kb
  • FB2 size 1913 kb
  • Formats lrf mobi txt mbr


John E. Harrigan and Paul R. Neel.

John E. As they do so, they are coming to rely more and more upon design professionals to help them build their roads to the future.

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The Executive Architect : Transforming Designers into Leaders. 5 RUR. Senior Residences : Designing Retirement Communities for the Future (Wiley Series in Healthcare and Senior Living Design)

The Executive Architect : Transforming Designers into Leaders. Senior Residences : Designing Retirement Communities for the Future (Wiley Series in Healthcare and Senior Living Design). Harrigan, Jennifer M. Raiser, Phillip H. Raiser. 2 RUR. Senior Residences. by John E. We cannot continue to accept the view that when times are good we will prosper and when times are bad we will suffer. We must move from a business of commissioned services to one of direct participation in all our clients' endeavors, where productive participation establishes us as trusted partners, the currency for a continuing relationship.

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Senior Residences equips architects and other industry professionals with a proven executive strategy for the design and development of successful Continuing Care Retirement Community (CCRC) projects.

The book is written primarily for architects, interior designers, and students of environmental design. Harrigan and Paul . eel In their drive to compete effectively in. .Also featuredthroughout the book are numerous instructive case studies.

Asthey do so, they are coming to rely more and more upon designprofessionals to help them build their roads to the future.

John Breckinridge (December 2, 1760 – December 14, 1806) was a lawyer and politician from the . He served in the state legislatures of Virginia and Kentucky before being elected to the . Senate and appointed United States Attorney General during the second term of President Thomas Jefferson. He is the progenitor of Kentucky's Breckinridge political family and the namesake of Breckinridge County, Kentucky.

"We cannot continue to accept the view that when times are good wewill prosper and when times are bad we will suffer. . . . We mustmove from a business of commissioned services to one of directparticipation in all our clients' endeavors, where productiveparticipation establishes us as trusted partners, the currency fora continuing relationship." --John E. Harrigan and Paul R.NeelIn their drive to compete effectively in the emerging worldeconomic order, today's enterprise organizations are undergoing aperiod of radical redesign, restructuring, and redefinition. Asthey do so, they are coming to rely more and more upon designprofessionals to help them build their roads to the future. Thismeans that unlimited opportunities now await the architect who canlook beyond the everyday aspects of professional practice and learnas much as possible about his or her clients' worlds. But forgingenduring partnerships with clients requires more than just provendesign skills on the part of an architect. Today's successfularchitect is as much a business executive as an artist. He or sheis conversant in an array of core business skills--includingmarketing, client relations, leadership, strategic management, andothers--rarely covered in professional education programs.Based, in large part, upon Professor John E. Harrigan's innovativeexecutive program for architects at California Polytechnic StateUniversity, The Executive Architect fills that critical gap inprofessional education. In addition to schooling designers in awide range of crucial business concepts, tools, and techniques, itprovides a complete blueprint for transforming a practice from onebased on the fulfillment of commissioned services to one based onan ongoing engagement with every aspect of clients' worlds--theirgoals, risks, opportunities, and unique corporate cultures.In creating this innovative guide, authors Harrigan and Neel drewon the experiences of more than a dozen of the nation's mostrespected executive architects, including Arthur Gensler, CharlesLuckman, and Judy Rowe. Throughout the book, these industry leadersoffer their insights, advice, and guidance on a wide range oftopics, from leadership to benchmarking, from forming strategicpartnerships to building knowledge base systems. Also featuredthroughout the book are numerous instructive case studies. Based onthe Harvard Business School model, these studies present a broadarray of successful decision-making examples.The Executive Architect helps designers acquire the skills neededto expand beyond the boundaries of current practice and to exploitthe unlimited opportunities and challenges of doing business in thenew world economic order.
Comments: (2)
Seevinev
Mr. Otwell's difficulty lies in applying this book to computer software design. Unfortunately, "architect" and "architecture" have been misappropriated, to the extent that an entire generation is apparently unaware that these words once specifically referred to the physical design of the built environment. You know: houses? Cities? Is this thing on?

I received my Bachelor of Science degree in Architecture from California State Polytechnic College at San Luis Obispo in 1976. Both of the authors were faculty members. Paul Neel was Dean of the School of Architecture and Environmental Design. John Harrigan taught classes in Human Factors.
Ionzar
I found this remaindered for only five bucks. I read it not as a building architect, but as someone interested in what other creative/engineering disciplines had to say about creative projects that I could apply to web projects.
The authors needed a better editor, that's for sure. There's lots of awkward writing here, and the interviews with architects are virtually unreadable, rambling, and vague.
Those involved in web or software consulting will find not a lot new here--have the issues of client relations and creative services marketing really not had this kind of treatment before?
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