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eBook Confronting Consumption epub

by Thomas Princen,Michael Maniates,Ken Conca

eBook Confronting Consumption epub
  • ISBN: 0262162083
  • Author: Thomas Princen,Michael Maniates,Ken Conca
  • Genre: Engineering
  • Subcategory: Engineering
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: The MIT Press (July 1, 2002)
  • Pages: 390 pages
  • ePUB size: 1537 kb
  • FB2 size 1774 kb
  • Formats txt mbr lrf lrf


An especially interesting observation appears in Michael Maniates's essay about the voluntary simplicity movement. He attended a voluntary simplicity day at a university.

ISBN-13: 978-0262661287. An especially interesting observation appears in Michael Maniates's essay about the voluntary simplicity movement. Thousands of people showed up, many more than the organizers expected.

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Confronting Consumption Michael Maniates is Professor of Political Science and Environmental Science at Allegheny College.

Confronting Consumption. The book concludes that confronting consumption must become a driving focus of contemporary environmental scholarship and activism. Out of Print ISBN: 9780262162081 392 pp. 6 in x 9 in June 2002. Michael Maniates is Professor of Political Science and Environmental Science at Allegheny College. This book was set in Sabon on 3B2 by Asco Typesetters, Hong Kong and was printed and bound in the United States of America. The MIT Press Cambridge, Massachusetts London, England. 2002 Massachusetts Institute of Technology. p. cm. Includes index.

2002, Confronting Consumption, Boston: MIT Press. VanderHoff Boersma, Francisco 2002, Interview with Author, San José el Paraíso, Oaxaca, Mexico

Confronting Consumption placesconsumption at the center of debate by conceptualizing "the consumption problem" and documenting diverse efforts to confront it. In Part 1, the book frames consumption as a problem of political and ecological economy, emphasizing core.

Confronting Consumption placesconsumption at the center of debate by conceptualizing "the consumption problem" and documenting diverse efforts to confront it. См. также: Макроэкономика. Специальные и отраслевые экономики. Издательство MIT Press.

Thomas Princen, Michael Maniates, Ken Conca. Comforting terms such as "sustainable development" and "green production" frame environmental debate by stressing technology (not green enough), economic growth (not enough in the right places), and population (too large). Concern about consumption emerges, if at all, in benign ways; as calls for green purchasing or more recycling, or for small changes in production processes. Many academics, policymakers, and journalists, in fact, accept the economists' view of consumption as nothing less than the purpose of the economy.

Social Sciences (Environmental Studies)

Social Sciences (Environmental Studies). Prof Maniates works on systems of sustainable consumption and production, social innovations for a low-growth world, and the design and implementation of undergraduate programmes in environmental studies. He’s authored several book chapters and more than three dozen conference papers, journal articles, and national op-eds on topics of consumption and overconsumption, effective undergraduate education, and paths to an environmentally sustainable future.

Their book of essays is directed to what they consider an imminent danger, the mass-consumption society already within the so-called developed economies and now just beginning to threaten less developed ones. The general theme is laid out in the first two or three chapters.

Comforting terms such as "sustainable development" and "green production" frame environmental debate by stressing technology (not green enough), economic growth (not enough in the right places), and population (too large). Concern about consumption emerges, if at all, in benign ways ;as calls for green purchasing or more recycling, or for small changes in production processes. Many academics, policymakers, and journalists, in fact, accept the economists' view of consumption as nothing less than the purpose of the economy. Yet many people have a troubled, intuitive understanding that tinkering at the margins of production and purchasing will not put society on an ecologically and socially sustainable path.Confronting Consumption places consumption at the center of debate by conceptualizing "the consumption problem" and documenting diverse efforts to confront it. In Part 1, the book frames consumption as a problem of political and ecological economy, emphasizing core concepts of individualization and commoditization. Part 2 develops the idea of distancing and examines transnational chains of consumption in the context of economic globalization. Part 3 describes citizen action through local currencies, home power, voluntary simplicity, "ad-busting," and product certification. Together, the chapters propose "cautious consuming" and "better producing" as an activist and policy response to environmental problems. The book concludes that confronting consumption must become a driving focus of contemporary environmental scholarship and activism.

Comments: (3)
Zeks Horde
This is a rather good book, a series of essays edited by three professors in the fields of politics, natural resources and environmental science, all of whom contributed essays. Despite being a bit heavy-going in places, it contains some important insights, a number of interesting ones and a few rather delightful ones. I found the discussion of the limitations of the reduce-recycle-reclaim, green-choice, tree-planting, bike-riding and similar individual-responsibility paradigms refreshingly frank. The explanations of how we lose sight of the environmental and social consequences of our consumption through 'distancing' and 'shadowing' were more difficult to stay with but important; likewise the chapter on the commoditization-value of various things and how it skews our attention (eg away from friendship and towards mind-altering drugs!). The inversion of the 'stages of production' to 'stages of consumption' is an insight that to me shifts this book up to 'important' status. The explanation of "frontier" styles of exploit-and-move (slash and burn) resource management was enlightening and, happily, crisp. I shared the pleasure of reviewer "takeadayoff" in the section on the Voluntary Simplicity Movement. I also enjoyed the section on off-grid power people and what actually motivates them, and the sections on more subversive ideas such as Adbusters and the power of organisations such as the Forest Stewardship Council.
I would recommend this book in general to any readers intrigued by the title, but particularly to students in the fields of politics, economics and resource management and also to jaded eco-warriors who see the need to develop new ways to promote the conservation message.
Purebinder
Excellent!
Zugar
Obviously you need to consume in order to survive and consume more in order to live comfortably. But in this country at least, it is almost impossible not to overconsume. Our president encourages us to spend more. Our vice president sneers that some "virtuous" people would have us conserve energy rather than use as much as we want to, at any cost. TV and other media bombard us with messages to eat more and buy more. Our financial advisors tell us to buy the biggest house we can afford. When was the last time anyone suggested saving money rather than "investing" it?

Confronting Consumption tackles the problem from several angles. I'm afraid the larger global arguments Princen and his fellow editors and academics make are lost on me when they write of "commoditization" and "conceptualizing the consumption problem." But in the final section they get down to ground level and talk about voluntary simplicity, Adbusters, and alternate methods of home power (off the grid).

An especially interesting observation appears in Michael Maniates's essay about the voluntary simplicity movement. He attended a voluntary simplicity day at a university. Thousands of people showed up, many more than the organizers expected. They wanted to know about cutting living expenses, downshifting, and job-sharing. They were not at all interested in the Sierra Club presentation or other "save the planet" groups. It isn't that people aspiring to live simply don't want to help save the planet. They just want to do it in a more manageable way, one person, one family at a time.

Unfortunately, that won't undo the ecological, financial, and human damage already caused by overconsumption. For that, we will need leaders who at the very least acknowledge that overconsumption is a problem, not a virtue.
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