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eBook Incredible Hulk (Video novel) epub

by Marvel comic group

eBook Incredible Hulk (Video novel) epub
  • ISBN: 0671828274
  • Author: Marvel comic group
  • Genre: Entertainment
  • Subcategory: Humor
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: Pocket (December 2, 1980)
  • ePUB size: 1352 kb
  • FB2 size 1508 kb
  • Formats doc lrf lit azw


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By customer groups & interests. This volume collects The Incredible Hulk The Hulk came quickly on the heels of Fantastic Four and should have been a hit due to the popularity of the Atlas/Marvel monster stories. Unlike the FF, however, the Hulk failed miserably. Marvel gave it their best shot - six bimonthly issues over a one year period, but it was no soap.

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Book by Marvel comic group
Comments: (7)
MARK BEN FORD
Stan Lee and Jack Kirby continue making new myths with superheroes that struggle with their inner demons. Hulk is about a young scientist who gets bathed by Gamma Rays, and survives to become a grey (and later green) monster at night. Later, Dr. Bruce Banner creates a machine that controls when he can become a monster. The danger is always that the monster doesn't like becoming the "weakling" and "puny" Bruce Banner. Hulk has his sidekick, Rick Jones, and a girl who loves Bruce. It's interesting that his girl's name is Betty Ross, the same name that Simon and Kirby used for the Captain America of the 40s. Although the plots are simple, they are enjoyable, and they represent good comic book samples of the sixties. And the inner conflict, plus being he anti-hero makes these stories even more interesting. Kirby's art at times seems sloppy in the action scenes, but most of it reveals promises to come in the seventies.
Tolrajas
Initial 6 issues of the Hulk. This was early in Marvel's superhero age and you can see the transition. Most of the early Hulk stories contain elements of the "monster/alien" stories from Tales to Astonish, Journey into Mystery, and Strange Tales. It is also evident that the characteristics of the Hulk were evolving. Early on lack of sun made him turn into the Hulk. Then it was being zapped by the gamma ray gun. Then who knows? When he was the Hulk, did he retain Dr. Banner's intellect. Sometimes, but not always. It was confusing to the reader, especially 10 year olds. They ended after 6 issues likely due to a lack of direction with the character. Too bad they didn't think of the Bill Bixby version earlier.
Precious
Just below the surface lies untamed and incredible power, once I cracked the cover I found undiscovered stories of the Hulking Thing I had never seen. I didn't start reading Hulk comics until about 1974 so all of these stories were new to me. But I never looked back into the older Hulk comics, so this was a real treat, I didn't know what I was missing.

It was a surprise to find stories where the Hulk is an intelligent, cunning and conniving Hulk. This is a real switch from what I'm used to; "HULK SMASH PUNY HUMAN!" The other thing noted by one other reviewer is that these stories are like the abridged version of comics, very short. It's good to get in a quick story while you wait for something like a TV commercial break. The dichotomy between the indestructible and the fragile is always present and remains the struggle throughout.

This Omnibus Collection of the Incredible Hulk does not read like a graphic novel. Although there are progressions and story threads that run through the different stories there is very little continuity. To me this was exciting because instead of reading something to a conclusion what I read was the evolution of the Hulk, Dr. Banner, The Leader, General Ross and Betty.

I am very happy to have this Incredible Hulk Omnibus Collection. For true believers, it is a must have. The overall quality is outstanding, the inks and page treatments are vibrant and archive quality.
Oveley
Stories from the 1960's. You gotta love them! The writing and artwork were way ahead of their time. I was impressed with the complexities of the clash of personalities of the Hulk and Dr. Banner. I didn't realize how dedicated Rick Jones was to Bruce Banner. And we got to see the formation of the infamous Teen Brigade that I heard about throughout the years of reading Marvel mags. Excellent reading!
Fani
I have been a huge comic book fan since I was a child. And Hulk has always been my favorite. Being a girl, I never had comic books growing up. So when I saw these masterwork books I was so excited. It was so cool to see where the Hulk had started out and changed over the seasons. My daughter loves the masterworks so much she took mine! Now I have to buy myself another one. Really awesome and so glad they made these.
Wiliniett
This volume collects The Incredible Hulk #1-6. The Hulk came quickly on the heels of Fantastic Four #1, and should have been a hit due to the popularity of the Atlas/Marvel monster stories. Unlike the FF, however, the Hulk failed miserably. Marvel gave it their best shot -- six bimonthly issues over a one year period, but it was no soap. This may be the reason why Spider-Man was first introduced in Amazing Fantasy #15. He stood a much better chance of being received in a magazine that already had a circulation, even if it wasn't that healthy. If it bombed, at least it would not be in his own title like The Hulk, sparing the publisher and creative team more embarrassment and possibly killing the FF along with it. After all, a comic book publisher cannot exist on the success of one magazine alone, and their older anthology books were starting to wane in popularity. Even the romance comics were doing better. Everyone knew that the revival of superhero stories was the way to go, due to DC's successful revamping of their Golden Age superheroes. Fortunately, the Amazing Spider-Man was an overwhelming success. Already 14 issues into the FF, the release of the Amazing Spider-Man #1 really helped propel Marvel into the Silver Age of superheroes, and by 1963, with the release of X-Men #1 and The Avengers #1 (not to mention Iron Man and Ant Man in Marvel's monster/sci-fi/fantasy anthology mags), the execs at DC were no longer laughing at the little mouse that roared. Of course, as most of you already know, Marvel eventually toppled that giant publisher a few years later, and this period in comic book history became known as "the Marvel Age of Comics."

The only complaint I have about this collection (and all of the Marvel Masterpieces) is that it was not printed on Baxter paper. Instead, Marvel used glossy stock, which is not the best medium for early four-color comics to be printed on. Great for the computer-generated stuff that has come out since the '90s, but not for these stories. Original comic book newsprint and Baxter paper, a thicker version of newsprint that ages nicely, was perfect for Silver Age comics and reprints like The Life of Captain Marvel, because they both have that ability to soak up, mix, tone-down, and soften the colors that look so garish on glossy stock. When DC reprinted their classics like Showcase #4 (1st appearance of the Silver Age Flash), they used the original comic book newsprint. Consequently, the reading experience was nearly identical to the original. That's very important to the Baby Boomers who were the target audience for these reprints. Because of Marvel's decision to use glossy stock, I can only give this product four stars.
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