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eBook The Cripple and His Talismans epub

by Anosh Irani

eBook The Cripple and His Talismans epub
  • ISBN: 0385670117
  • Author: Anosh Irani
  • Genre: Entertainment
  • Subcategory: Humor
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: Anchor Canada; Revised ed. edition (November 2, 2010)
  • Pages: 272 pages
  • ePUB size: 1109 kb
  • FB2 size 1825 kb
  • Formats rtf lrf azw lrf


brilliant debut novel, The Cripple and His Talismans, radiates with the energy of Bombay, albeit a dark . Irani captures the cadence and inflections of his surreal Bombay perfectly. does an amazing job creating his own universe with its own rules and expectations.

brilliant debut novel, The Cripple and His Talismans, radiates with the energy of Bombay, albeit a dark energy. Irani commands attention from the first sentence. Irani gives us a virulent text and a memorably complex narrator: part psychopath, part disaffected rich kid, part bohemian wanderer through a singularly imagined world. An impressive debut, a beautifully written modern-day fable.

To read something like The Cripple and his Talismans and not get affected by it, by its sheer magnitude, insanity .

To read something like The Cripple and his Talismans and not get affected by it, by its sheer magnitude, insanity, and almost a shock-like quality is not a possible feat. Taking the readers into the labyrinthine by-lanes of Bombay, Anosh Irani’s new novel The Cripple and His Talismans is a tangled tale of self realisation that the young protagonist undergoes when he wakes up in a hospital bed, sans an arm.

ANOSH IRANI has published four critically acclaimed and award-winning novels: The Cripple and His Talismans (2004), a national bestseller; The Song of Kahunsha(2006), which was an international bestseller and shortlisted for Canada Reads and the Ethel Wilson Fiction Prize; Dahanu.

ANOSH IRANI has published four critically acclaimed and award-winning novels: The Cripple and His Talismans (2004), a national bestseller; The Song of Kahunsha(2006), which was an international bestseller and shortlisted for Canada Reads and the Ethel Wilson Fiction Prize; Dahanu Road (2010), which was shortlisted for the Man Asian Literary Prize, and The Parcel (2016. which was a finalist for the Governor General's Literary Award for Fiction and the Writers' Trust Fiction Prize.

Algonquin Books of Chapel Hill. inlibrary; printdisabled; ; china. Books for People with Print Disabilities. Internet Archive Books. Uploaded by loader-DanaB on July 26, 2010. SIMILAR ITEMS (based on metadata).

Anosh Irani has a wonderful wit. I've never laughed so much from a book. An unnamed narrator goes on a quest for his missing arm through the dark, impoverished, violent and funny side of Bombay.

Anosh Irani on Bookbits radio talks about Dahanu Road. Anosh Irani (born 1974) is an Indo-Canadian novelist and playwright. He published his debut novel, The Cripple and His Talismans, in 2004. An Irani (like Parsi, but of more recent Iranian extraction), he was born and raised in Mumbai, although he has indicated that he personally prefers the city's traditional English name, Bombay. After working in advertising in India, he moved to Vancouver in 1998 to study and pursue writing. This dark fable won critical acclaim for its magic realist depiction of the seedy beggars' underworld of India.

With humour and ingenuity, Anosh Irani has crafted a bold story that is as much about loss as it is about the presence of faith in a world that can be as cruel as it. .What's in the Box? 1 x The Cripple and His Talismans

With humour and ingenuity, Anosh Irani has crafted a bold story that is as much about loss as it is about the presence of faith in a world that can be as cruel as it can be forgiving. Number of Pages: 0 Pages. Bar Code: 9789350296035.

boy riding the rails. They all lead him to Baba Rakhu, master of the underworld, who will reveal the story of his lost arm-for a price. A highly imaginative novel, full of humour, poetry, and insights, written in a beautiful, spare style. Throughout the narrative looms a great city, Bombay, crazily reflected in the life of one of its inhabitants who, by means baffling, heinous, desperate and often very funny, seeks to embrace the divine with both arms. Yann Martel, author of Life of Pi. Fiction. To read this book, upload an EPUB or FB2 file to Bookmate

Prepare to enter a world where the norms of human behavior — even the rules governing time and gravity — are set on their heads. This dark and wry fable begins with the narrator waking up and discovering he is missing an arm. He has no idea how he lost it or how to find it — but as he searches the chaotic, often surreal streets of Bombay, he meets an absurd and marvelous cast of characters who offer him clues: a woman selling rainbows, a beggar living under an egg cart, a coffin maker who builds finger-sized caskets, a giant who lives underwater, a homeless boy riding the rails. They all lead him to Baba Rakhu, master of the underworld, who will reveal the story of his lost arm — for a price.Funny and wise, violent and tender, The Cripple and His Talismans is an impressive debut for lovers of Samuel Beckett, Lewis Carroll, and Salman Rushdie.
Comments: (4)
Thundershaper
An exquisite gem of a novel. The unnamed narrator, a well off resident of Bombay, has lost his arm, but can't remember how. He sets off on a search for his missing limb, following seemingly random advice from a series of beggars and shopkeepers. A leper gives him a finger that fell off, which the narrator treasures as a talisman to aid him in his quest and carries with him for much of the book. He travels through a number of seedy Bombay locales such as a little café that caters to delinquent students and a theatre playing an indistinguishable Indian movie, and winds up in a subterranean room where Baba Rakhu operates a business stealing limbs at night from apparently undeserving persons and selling them to those in need..

The mood is at times dreamlike, at times entirely matter of fact. The narrator is given vague prophesies. He is asked riddles he cannot answer. He meets Gura the floating beggar, visits his favorite Maliaka at the brothel whom he fantasizes of marrying, sees dancing cockroaches, black and brown, and dreams he is the Emperor Akbar. He meets -- and joins -- two naked men, one blind the other a drunk, who are trying to defecate on a mound near a rail line. They wisecrack about the state of the world in exchanges reminiscent of Shakespeare, but they cannot complete their task until the train passes.

The narrator has some ugly secrets. He recalls and relives some disturbing events in his life, which, without giving away the plot, have a connection with his missing limb. He eventually returns to Baba Rakhu's store where he reconciles his life and missing limb.

The writing is elegant and beautiful. The dialogue quick and believable, although what is said often is bizarre. Aphorisms, seemingly genuine Hindi ones, are spoken, such as "Once your journey begins, you cannot end it." The images are haunting, such as Rakhu's store where limbs are carefully hung on the walls. "Bombay" says the narrator. "There is no other like it" says a little boy.

In recent years, I have been reading a number of Third World novels that have been highly recommended, such as Things Fall Apart or Season of Migration to the North. Those were certainly good. I picked up The Cripple and his Talismans at a used bookstore, having no idea what to expect. It is, by far, the best novel I have read in recent years. My only criticism, and it's only a suggestion, is that the book could have used a short glossary for the dozen or so Hindi words used.
Vishura
This is Anosh Irani's debut novel. I really admire his craft. His use of similies and allegories is just perfect.

A man wakes up in a Bombay hospital to find his arm has been amputated. He goes in search of it in the dark side of Bombay. Since most first novels are to some extent autobiographical, I continuously wondered what experiences were really part of the author's life. To strengthen my doubts, the experiences of the protagonist are written in first person singular (the character I).

On most occasions the incidents don't make a real sense. The slant gets confusing. What does the author intend to tell?

Is it the rediscovery of a missing part of the personality? Is this some kind of a spiritual quest? (I hope it wasn't) or was the intention to show the dark side of Bombay?

Though incidents have depicted vividly, sometimes they look so distorted as to be called 'ramblings of a psychotic mind.'

Still I must say I enjoyed reading the book and I wouldn't discourage anyone who wishes to read it.
IWAS
Many books are referred to as "darkly comic." In this case, it's true. It's a dark tale but one that is genuinely funny. An unnamed narrator goes on a quest for his missing arm through the dark, impoverished, violent and funny side of Bombay.

The journey is episodic as the wealthy narrator encounters odd characters, wakes in new situations and generally moves through an absurdist world that reveals a Bombay he didn't know, as it also reveals a self he didn't know - or at least, he had been avoiding.

In the end, it is a quest for himself. Or perhaps it's more accurate to say a harmonization of himself through the discovery of a strangely and wonderfully contradictory Bombay.
Hamrl
I love this book. Anosh Irani has a wonderful wit. I've never laughed so much from a book.
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