» » The Kings of New York: A Year Among the Geeks, Oddballs, and Genuises Who Make Up America's Top HighSchool Chess Team

eBook The Kings of New York: A Year Among the Geeks, Oddballs, and Genuises Who Make Up America's Top HighSchool Chess Team epub

by Michael Weinreb

eBook The Kings of New York: A Year Among the Geeks, Oddballs, and Genuises Who Make Up America's Top HighSchool Chess Team epub
  • ISBN: 1592402615
  • Author: Michael Weinreb
  • Genre: Entertainment
  • Subcategory: Puzzles & Games
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: Gotham; 1 edition (March 1, 2007)
  • Pages: 304 pages
  • ePUB size: 1395 kb
  • FB2 size 1317 kb
  • Formats lrf doc lit lrf


Game of Kings: A Year Among the Geeks, Oddballs, and Genu. With a narrative rich in voice-a gathering of intoxicating characters-Michael Weinreb has delivered nothing short of a generational classic. This is a stunning book.

Game of Kings: A Year Among the Geeks, Oddballs, and Genu.

Weinreb spends more than a year tracking the chess team from Edward R. .Man, I loved this book. Murrow High, a Brooklyn school whose teams Interesting characters with uniquely different personalities? Check. Weinreb not only traces the history of Murrow’s chess team, but also the brief history of successful American chess players (. While my high school chess team was nothing like Murrow's, the dynamics were the same: a few students wildly devoted/obsessed with chess, some interested only in pick-up games, and others that showed up only once or twice a year.

October 1, 2016 admin. A 12 months with the boy geniuses of the nation?s most sensible highschool chess group, now in paperback with a brand new afterword. Edward R. Murrow highschool has lengthy been one in every of New York?s public-education luck tales, a college the place there aren't any varsity activities, and the nearest factor to jocks is located at the powerhouse chess crew. Award-winning sportswriter Michael Weinreb follows the participants of the Murrow chess group via a complete season.

LibraryThing members' description. An award-winning sportswriter takes you inside a year with the nation’s top high school chess team. With strict admission standards and a progressive curriculum, Brooklyn’s Edward R. Murrow High School has long been one of New York’s public-education success stories, serving a diverse neighborhood of immigrants and minorities and ranking among the nation’s best high schools.

An award-winning sportswriter takes you inside a year with the nation’s top high school chess team. Game of Kings : A Year among the Oddballs and Geniuses Who Make up America's Top High School Chess Team.

Michael Weinreb, who writes for the New York Times and Newsday, describes a year spent with a Brooklyn . Chess Olympiad with video specials by Pelletier. Plus 11 opening articles with new repertoire idesas, .

Michael Weinreb, who writes for the New York Times and Newsday, describes a year spent with a Brooklyn High School chess team as it strives for a national championship. This description of the cultural milieu of the modern chess world makes for a fascinating read. 4 Nc6 or a new recipe in the London System! ChessBase 15 - Mega package. Find the right combination! ChessBase 15 program + new Mega Database 2020 with 8 million games and more than 80,000 master analyses.

Place of Publication. Save on Non-Fiction Books. Trending price is based on prices over last 90 days. The Concise 48 Laws Of Power by Robert Greene 9781861974044 Brand New. Current slide {CURRENT SLIDE} of {TOTAL SLIDES}- Save on Non-Fiction Books. What The F @ Should I Make For Dinner? By Zach Golden.

American chess has been in decline since Fischer's self-imposed exile in 1975, but that hasn't staunched the flow of chess literature. Michael Weinreb's The Kings of New York appeared in the US last year, and now surfaces here. Weinreb tells the story of the Edward R Murrow School in Brooklyn - a "public" (in US parlance) school founded on laissez-faire principles in 1974 that, up against all manner of elite establishments, has won the national schools chess championship six times, thanks mainly to a maths teacher called Eliot Weiss, who scours New York for prodigies.

Michael Weinreb, who writes for the New York Times and Newsday, describes a year spent with a Brooklyn High School chess . 3/7/2007 – When one or America's top sports writers takes on chess, we sit up an take notice. Michael Weinreb, who writes for the New York Times and Newsday, describes a year spent with a Brooklyn High School chess team as it strives for a national championship.

Use tags to describe a product . for a movie Themes heist, drugs, kidnapping, coming of age Genre drama, parody, sci-fi, comedy Locations paris, submarine, new york.

Manufacturer: Gotham Release date: 1 March 2007 ISBN-10 : 1592402615 ISBN-13: 9781592402618. Use tags to describe a product .

Documents a season with the highly competitive Edward R. Murrow High School chess team, from cash games in Washington Square Park to the SuperNationals in Nashville, citing the contributions of their calculus teacher coach and a prospective grand-master player.
Comments: (7)
elegant stranger
Very satisfied with "Kings of New York." Weinreb has found himself a good story for a book and he executes very nicely.

As the book's stars, the eight or ten members of the Edward R Murrow High School chess team - a national dynasty in high school chess - are followed in a year where they chase another city, state and national title trifecta. Weinreb does a really admirable job of developing and exploring these characters as subjects. His observations and experiences with the team inform the characterization but never infiltrate the text.

Weinreb's underdog angle is a little overplayed. He seems to insinuate that the kids at Brooklyn's Murrow High are underdogs because of - alternately - their socioeconomic status, their family situations, their living conditions, their schooling and even their race. He ignores the fact that he is recounting the story of a half dozen kids identified and essentially recruited to play for the school (by the club's coach and a school math teacher) because they have been identified in middle school and earlier as being in some cases prodigies in chess, but at least for being some of the best players in what is by far America's most chess-interested city.

Weinreb returns again and again to David and Goliath set-ups as Murrow players take on players from - for example - an exclusive and expensive Tucson private academy, or NYC's own finishing schools for the mega-rich - kids who are bound for the Ivies and who bed down in multi-million dollar Manhattan manses. But, Weinreb's own story reveals a very different reality - while Murrow's stars (two Soviet Bloc émigrés, two Puerto Ricans from Brookyln's projects, and a handful of other similar types) may live their home lives in very different surroundings, and have different hopes for their futures, they are steeped in chess training and practice thanks to NYC public programs that make city kids as familiar with the game and as likely to succeed as any kid from any desert-bound Arizona backwater.

Weinreb also spends too little time exploring the ethical considerations surrounding Mr. Weiss, the team's coach and a school math coach. Weiss, while responsible for many of the team's players getting into Murrow in the first place, appears to preside over a graduation rate that would make The University of Miami football team blush. Too many of his players are not attending class, not on track for graduation, and perhaps not getting what they really need to succeed in high school. But, I can't blame Weinreb for not wanting to take his eye off the ball, which is really the interesting story of these kids.

As you read "Kings of New York," you can't help but notice the proliferation of Slavic surnames attached to America, especially New York, and especially Brooklyn's best players. Part of that is attributable to the Little Odessa phenomenon in Brooklyn; and, Weinreb gives a little primer on why Eastern Europeans and Russians are so dominant in the game, but aside from his tendency to return to platitudes about the "game being more important" to Russians (and former Soviet bloc players) he never really explores or explains why? how? or, since when?

But, all of this is to make the book sound like its shortcomings ruined the enjoyment -- they did not. On the brighter side again, the book is very accessible to non-players. I don't know from a rook, but I was able to follow Weinreb as he recounts some of the more dramatic matches move-by-move. The book is well organized and the pacing is good, and coupled with a really enjoyable look at some of the teenagers at the book's center, it makes for fun reading.

I would recommend the book to readers who consider themselves to be more mainstream sports fans. There really is a focus on competition that will feel familiar here. As an ex-amateur boxer, looking back on my career what I relish most about the sport is the opportunities it gave me to go places and meet people I never would have otherwise. As a competitor, it was always exciting to go into a tournament and get to take on a tough as nails cowboy, then a kid from the worst part of the worst city, then some backwater bumpkin from somewhere so hot it made it seem sensible to wrastle alligators. In the same way, for Murrow's players, chess becomes their magic carpet, taking them on a ride that they will certainly never forget, and in many ways preparing them for a lot of life's challenges and opening their eyes to its rewards. In that way, I would compare the book very favorably to one of my all-time sports favorites, Mitch Albom's "Fab Five," and even to some of the other acclaimed sports titles (i.e., "Friday Night Lights).

JAW
Vispel
I really liked this book. I was a chess player in high school, so this book brought back some memories. Sal Bercys is the highest rated player on the Edward Murrow Highs school chess team, but he is not really a team player. He is more into himself. Alex Lenderman is the 2nd highest rated player, and his dad comes along with him to all the tournaments. Oscar is not quite the player that the first two guys are, but he is funny, street smart, and a heck of a poker player.

Shawn is a 1900 rated player who sometimes needs a little kick in the pants to show up on time for tournaments. Actually, he needs some motivation to attend class.

It's fun watching the students grow up, dig deep down inside to win games or salvage draws, and learn how to get along better with each other. It was nice to see Sal start to care more about the other team members toward the end of the book, though you can feel the uneasy tension/rivalry between him and Lenderman.

Chess is the stage on which this story is told, but this really a coming of age tale, where a high school chess team learns about life and the world around them.

One disturbing thing about the chess world is the sexist attitude many of the players have. Not so much the Murrow players, but many others in the chess world. There is also an "I'm better than you are" smugness about some of the higher rated players that some may find annoying.

But this is truly an engaging, real life story about real life students from Brooklyn, New York. Thumbs up.
Timberahue
I will admit personal bias in reviewing this book, as I graduated from Edward R Murrow High School, the subject school. Nonetheless, this book paints an accurate and sympathetic picture of scholastic high school chess. The team members are either the children of immigrants or come from disadvantaged backgrounds.The book recounts their struggles during a year when the chess team won the national championship.In doing so, it paints the landscape of what chess looks like presently in the United States. The book also captures all the neuroses of adolescence combined with all the neuroses of chess players, to make the subject matter comical at certain points. The writing style is loose and sometimes cliché. However, this does not distract from the compelling subject matter. I highly recommend this book for anyone interested in education or scholastic chess.
Adoraris
This book was a running commentary into the life of the top chess team in America. The book was void of sex, drugs, and other issues in the typical America high school. The book provided insight into the America education system, into the chess culture in America, and into the world of a genius. One would believe that these geniuses would be top students in high school, but most of them struggle with staying engaged in school. These young people are bored with school which does not motivate them. They are more motivated to win money playing chess. The challenge of chess is greater than the challenge that school presents. It makes me wonder about the policy of "no student left behind" because it seems that really it is "no student gets ahead." Students like these need a challenge or they will disengage from school. How can you care about school when the really test is against another grandmaster chess champion. Most people would not enjoy this book unless you enjoy chess. The book is incredibly well written. It makes the basic story a flowing narrative.
eBooks Related to The Kings of New York: A Year Among the Geeks, Oddballs, and Genuises Who Make Up America's Top HighSchool Chess Team
Contacts | Privacy Policy | DMCA
All rights reserved.
lycee-pablo-picasso.fr © 2016-2020